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is this frame too big??

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is this frame too big??

Old 01-07-06, 01:43 AM
  #1  
sbskates
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is this frame too big??

if i go up in size 1 cm more and buy a new frame that is only available in this size which is i cm over what i ride now on a standard road frame non sloping tube etc. will i notice that much?

i can stand over mine now and pull it up an inch or so comfrortably.

thanks
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Old 01-07-06, 02:31 AM
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It depends on what you like in terms of fit and handling as well as the geometry of your current bike and the one you're considering. Top tube length is what you want to compare between the two bikes to know what the real size difference is. If the new frame you're looking at has a similar top tube length, similar or slightly steeper head tube angle, and a similar wheelbase, you might not notice that it feels bigger, but it probably will be different in some ways that what you're riding now. I'm sure there are others here who can explain it better.
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Old 01-07-06, 04:55 AM
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Take it for a test ride... see how it feels then make your desision then.
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Old 01-07-06, 05:04 AM
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The frame-size should be fine if you've got 1" of standover clearance. However, measure the top-tube length and compare to your existing frame. Assuming seat-tube angle is similar, a longer top-tube would just need a shorter stem than the one on your existing bike for the same reach to the bars.

Typically larger frames with longer top-tubes also have longer wheelbases. Some manufacturers steepen the head-tube angle to quicken steering to compensate for the longer wheelbase. If the new bike has a longer wheelbase but same or less-agressive head-tube angle than your existing frame, then you may notice it's less nimble, but more stable at high speeds. Or the reverse could also be true where the new bike might have similar wheelbase, but steep head-tube, which would make it feel more nimble.
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Old 01-07-06, 05:37 AM
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Originally Posted by DannoXYZ
The frame-size should be fine if you've got 1" of standover clearance. However, measure the top-tube length and compare to your existing frame. Assuming seat-tube angle is similar, a longer top-tube would just need a shorter stem than the one on your existing bike for the same reach to the bars.

Typically larger frames with longer top-tubes also have longer wheelbases. Some manufacturers steepen the head-tube angle to quicken steering to compensate for the longer wheelbase. If the new bike has a longer wheelbase but same or less-agressive head-tube angle than your existing frame, then you may notice it's less nimble, but more stable at high speeds. Or the reverse could also be true where the new bike might have similar wheelbase, but steep head-tube, which would make it feel more nimble.
+1
The bigger frame may even ride smaller then your present frame because there is more then 1cm of difference in geometry of frames from mfr. to mfr. in terms of what makes a frame ride big or small...specifically top tube length, head tube length and seat tube angle. More acute seat tube angles reduce effective top tube length. Longer head tubes decrease reach not only in vertical component but horizontally along top tube due to head tube angle. Only way to know is to compare all dimensions and not just one or two from the new frame you are considering to your current frame.
HTH,
George
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Old 01-07-06, 09:03 AM
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sbskates
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the bike is the same frame type shape ans company as mine now. it is a standard race frame traditional style
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Old 01-07-06, 12:30 PM
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Originally Posted by sbskates
the bike is the same frame type shape ans company as mine now. it is a standard race frame traditional style
The only thing contrary to what you write is most frame manufacturers sell frames in 2cm not 1 cm increments. If you want a rock solid answer then you would have to post both geometries. Honestly believe most would agree that 1 cm can be tuned by saddle adjustment and stem length and rise in almost all cases...depending how dead on you are with your current fit.
HTH,
George
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Old 01-07-06, 12:32 PM
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I thought the latest word was that everyone is riding a frame that's too small?
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Old 01-07-06, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by pigmode
I thought the latest word was that everyone is riding a frame that's too small?
Depends who you listen to. Extrapolating from what members on this board generally ride based upon posts and responses, I would tend to say yes. I believe in Grant Petersen's fitting philosophy (not his bikes) but many don't subscribe.
http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/htm...framesize.html
George
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