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i'm new to rollers, need some advice

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i'm new to rollers, need some advice

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Old 01-10-06, 10:33 PM
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akakak
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i'm new to rollers, need some advice

i have a kreitler roller i just got out of the basement and i replaced the belt so it should be good to go. my roomate bought the roller like 10 years ago but it's still good.

my question is this:

i have a stand that attaches to the front fork, and i used it like that and it's great.

i think maybe some people use rollers without the stand, and just balance the front wheel. is this true?

what are the benefits of using it like this instead of using it with the fork stand?

does using a roller damage your bike at all?



ps ...one more question- it makes a sliding, whiring sound, is that okay?
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Old 01-10-06, 10:52 PM
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Originally Posted by akakak
i have a kreitler roller i just got out of the basement and i replaced the belt so it should be good to go. my roomate bought the roller like 10 years ago but it's still good.

my question is this:

i have a stand that attaches to the front fork, and i used it like that and it's great.

i think maybe some people use rollers without the stand, and just balance the front wheel. is this true?

what are the benefits of using it like this instead of using it with the fork stand?

does using a roller damage your bike at all?

ps ...one more question- it makes a sliding, whiring sound, is that okay?

yes....with a little practice you will be able ride with both wheels on the rollers. See my pic below. It took me a few evenings of practice to get to this point but it makes exercise alot more fun. The benefits are it forces you to improve your balance but the biggie is it forces you to be smooth. You cant just hammer, you have to spin smooth. Gradually up your cadence till you can spin for an extended time at over 100rpm with out bouncing. You will see the benefits on the road. No damage to your bike on the rollers. If anything it is the best for the bike of all the indoor trainers since nothing is being held. There is no stress on the bike. Whirring sound is normal. Have fun and make sure you have a wall or something to hang onto while you learn to stay balanced.

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Old 01-10-06, 11:01 PM
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I always enjoyed riding rollers, they are much more involving than the stationary style since you need to concentrate on your balance.

Here's some info
http://www.ehow.com/how_14201_ride-rollers-cycling.html
http://www.coachseiji.com/rollers.html
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Old 01-10-06, 11:03 PM
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doesn't look much fun from that photo
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Old 01-10-06, 11:05 PM
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Originally Posted by climbo
doesn't look much fun from that photo
LoL...I was trying to look tough. I don't think it worked..LoL
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Old 01-10-06, 11:27 PM
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Shed the stand/support thingy - using it will do nothing for your technique. With it, you might just as well be using a regular trainer. Use a fairly high (long) gear to start with - when the wheels are spinning fast, the bike is more stable. If the bike has clipless pedals, you might want to start by wearing regular sneakers instead of your cycling shoes. When you get more confident balancing on the rollers, change one of the sneakers for a cleated shoe, and get comfortable clipping in and out very quickly, eventually changing both sneakers to cycling shoes.

It's quite easy to learn the technique - just remember that the steering is very sensitive - things seem to happen much quicker on the rollers than they do on the road and you only have a very short time to correct any error. Take care not to over-correct. You need to concentrate ALL of the time - if you let your attention wander in the slightest you'll fall over. A crash isn't as bad as it is on the road, for on rollers you have virtually no momentum - you just fall off and the wheels stop.

I put a milk crate on each side of the rollers which I stand on to get started, and it also makes stopping much easier - just try to avoid hitting them with the pedals if you wander to the edge of the rollers.

I think I get a better work out on the rollers than I do if I spend the same amount of time on the trainer.

Hope this helps -

- Wil
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Old 01-11-06, 08:08 AM
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thanks for the advice! I really appreciate it.
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Old 01-11-06, 09:00 AM
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One starting technique is to put the rollers in a doorway, with the door frame even with or just in front of your shoulders. If you start to drift one way or the other you can just grab the door frame to keep yourself upright.

Just make sure that there's nothing on either side of you that would be dangerous to fall on. (I almost put my arm through a window pane.)

Rollers will definitely smooth out you're pedaling. You can get a pretty good work out too, especially with the wind trainer attachments available for Kreitlers. I think rollers are harder than outside riding below 20mph and a bit easier above that (no air resistance to overcome).
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Old 01-11-06, 09:35 AM
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Good info link:

http://www.kreitler.com/rollertips.p...cpg=rollertips

Keep at it. It will do wonders for your balance and handling out on the road.
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Old 01-11-06, 03:52 PM
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Ditch the fork stand ( i got one with my rollers off ebay it is still in the bubble wrap it was packed in) sick the rollers in a door frame and go for it. I am most likely the odd man out. as I will say clip in you've worked on the road at developeing a stroke using clipless. so why change now. Give it time and it will come before you know it you will be riding without hands doing sprits and intervals. and my personal favorite a game of catch. This is what happens when you do group rides on rollers.
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Old 02-11-06, 11:25 AM
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I gotta say I agree completely with Milice. Don't even think about using the fork stand. I've taught many people to ride rollers; it takes about 20 minutes. The key is to practice for the first ten minutes by leaning your elbow against the adjacent wall to learn to keep the bike vertical, and to learn the effects of steering on the rollers. Most people end up leaning too far sideways, and get discouraged - learn how to keep the bike vertical. Then after about 10 minutes you begin letting go of the wall and you're set.
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Old 02-13-06, 02:09 AM
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I find a 3 foot step ladder is indispensible. It serves 2 purposes.

I put it on the left side of the bike so I can step on the first or second step to swing my leg over the bike. Then while holding onto the top of the ladder after clipping in (it's got a smooth top bar about 3 feet off the ground) I can pedal until I get up to speed.

I can even move it away from the bike once I'm up to speed for adequate pedal clearance. Dismounting is easy w/o the ladder as I just slow down, unclip, and fall off to the side using my right foot to catch.

I throw down a 3 foot piece of plywood under the rollers and I can spin anywhere with the ladder and plywood. If I'm in front of the big screen in the living room, I put a crappy blanket under the plywood.
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