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You're going down! What are some tactics to crash as safely as possible?

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You're going down! What are some tactics to crash as safely as possible?

Old 03-20-06, 03:47 AM
  #101  
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The whole notion that you can 'relax' in the certain knowledge that you're about to crash flies in the face of human nature and your brain's natural response to danger. Good luck with that : ). Which presupposes that you'll have ample warning for this fantasy reaction. And you generally won't. Just wear a helmet and ride smart. In hundreds of races I crashed ONCE. This had to do with how I raced:

•*Not a big sprinter, more of a 'get in the break once in a while' guys. If you sprint quite a bit your crash danger ramps up. Part of racing.

• I rode near the FRONT at all tims (so did Lance, constantly, specifically to avoid crashes)

•*I had a nose for avoiding crashes. I would see dicey situations unfolding and stay away from them when possible

THAT stuff you can do. 'Prepare to crash'? Not in my experience. That's sort of like 'preparing to sneeze' : ). And that's crashing while RACING. Crashes on the open road while training? Again, it's almost always 'BANG' and you're on the ground. 90%+ of the time.
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Old 03-20-06, 08:48 AM
  #102  
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I agree with patentcad. My worst crash I was bouncing on the ground before I knew I was falling.
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Old 03-20-06, 08:48 AM
  #103  
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Originally Posted by patentcad
The whole notion that you can 'relax' in the certain knowledge that you're about to crash flies in the face of human nature and your brain's natural response to danger. Good luck with that


LOL, obviously you haven't crashed that much (which you already pointed out), which explains your fear and absent understanding of being able to relax. It might seem impossible for you to relax when you crash because you get really scared and just want to pee your pants and stiffen up like a board..... but believe me when I say it's POSSIBLE to relax, even if you know the crash is coming.

Sorry, but I've crashed so many more times than you have and without a doubt stand behind my statement of RELAXING when you crash. My friend who had the same outlook as you ALMOST DIED during a crash and I was right behind him. It wasn't pretty and he even tells me to this day that he tensed up too much. Because of his stiffening up, his shoulder was pulled right out of his collarbone along with some other rather serious results. One crash out of hundreds of races doesn't qualify you to tell others this BS, it's simply not true, you can relax during a crash even if you know it's coming.

You know the stories of people that fall from really high places and survive? It's usually because they pass out before hitting the ground, causing them to be completely relaxed so they don't tranfer all that shock through their body and break every bone.

I'm continuing to respond to your posts because I don't want others to think this... don't believe that it's impossible to relax people. Take it from someone who has countless crashes with results that were always better when relaxed, and always worse when scared and stiff. Sure PATENTCAD, maybe you're an outstanding rider because you've only crashed once out of hundreds of races, but I can hold my own on my bike and crashing was the only way I was able to learn from my mistakes and become a professional skateboarder and snowboarder.... Professionals in most extreme sports and even cycling have experienced a large number of crashes and learned from them.

Please don't misguide people on such an important subject, this is something close to my heart because of personal experiences and I don't want others to get the wrong info.

Billy

Last edited by sleepystarz; 03-20-06 at 08:56 AM.
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Old 03-20-06, 09:02 AM
  #104  
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I gotta go with sleepy YO! I've been skating for 27 years and done some slams that would curl your toenails. If you're stiff you can't do anything to help yourself. In 6 years of messing I've had some evil crazy **** happen and I've walked away from all of it. In the time the brain registers the crash is coming to the time the impact happens is an eternity to relive over and over to learn what caused it.

Yo Billy when were you pro?
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Old 03-20-06, 09:02 AM
  #105  
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Originally Posted by big john
I agree with patentcad. My worst crash I was bouncing on the ground before I knew I was falling.
Crashes can definately happen fast but you can always learn to relax. It becomes second nature, even if everything happens instantly. After you learn this, it's not something you think about but something you do. I'm simply saying if you can learn to relax rather than tense up you will almost always have a better outcome.
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Old 03-20-06, 09:06 AM
  #106  
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It's also one of the basic premises in Judo and most other martial arts. Learning to fall in a manner that will distribute the impact over the whole body is a great skilll I leaned at 12. A wonderful life as an adrenaline junkie ensued, never wore a cast.
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Old 03-20-06, 09:06 AM
  #107  
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Originally Posted by sleepystarz
Crashes can definately happen fast but you can always learn to relax. It becomes second nature, even if everything happens instantly. After you learn this, it's not something you think about but something you do. I'm simply saying if you can learn to relax rather than tense up you will almost always have a better outcome.

I'm sure this guy got a chance to 'relax' through his crash.

https://www.bestofgooglevideo.com/video.php?video=116

...especially, after his face-plant knocked him out.
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Old 03-20-06, 09:19 AM
  #108  
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Nice face plant DAMN, he would have been much better off had his helmet not disappeared after the initial impact, you can see it intact leaving the frame. 172kms *shutters*
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Old 03-20-06, 09:23 AM
  #109  
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Originally Posted by NoRacer
I'm sure this guy got a chance to 'relax' through his crash.

https://www.bestofgooglevideo.com/video.php?video=116

...especially, after his face-plant knocked him out.
Sure, if that guy would have stiffened up during his crash he'd probably be dead. Getting knocked out and being loosygoosy was a much better scenario than staying awake and stiffening up. There's no denying a stiff, tense body will transmit much more shock and result in much more damage than a loose body. BTW, cool sig, do you update those miles each month?
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Old 03-20-06, 09:31 AM
  #110  
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Originally Posted by sleepystarz
BTW, cool sig, do you update those miles each month?
My I'net access is limited to at work for now, so I update each work day. I commute daily, unless there's ice on the roads--like possibly tomorrow--and sometimes I get a chance to ride after my commute home.
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Old 03-20-06, 11:43 AM
  #111  
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Originally Posted by johnnny
If you have 0.75 seconds to think about how to crash, you shouldn't be crashing at all. 0.75 seconds is plenty enough time to be able to regain control.
Ok, that's ridiculous. Consider descending a winding mountain road at 45 mph. Too fast for conditions, you try to take a long sweeping curve but you see that there is sand and gravel on the road, and you know that if you turn too sharply or apply the brakes you will wash out. Your turning radius is limited and you can't slow down fast enough to stop. You are going off the edge of the road, but you have enough time to realize it. This scenario is not that unusual.
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Old 03-20-06, 05:48 PM
  #112  
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Any amount that you can slow down before you launch is good. Remember your high skool physics: E = 1/2 * mv^2. The v squared is key.
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Old 03-20-06, 06:35 PM
  #113  
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Foot out, back brake on. Can I make it? Yes? No? DAMN Lookin for the lie down. Hamburger and raw road rash to table 13 please ..... live to tell the tale.
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Old 03-23-06, 12:44 PM
  #114  
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Originally Posted by recursive
Ok, that's ridiculous. Consider descending a winding mountain road at 45 mph. Too fast for conditions, you try to take a long sweeping curve but you see that there is sand and gravel on the road, and you know that if you turn too sharply or apply the brakes you will wash out. Your turning radius is limited and you can't slow down fast enough to stop. You are going off the edge of the road, but you have enough time to realize it. This scenario is not that unusual.
Exactly. Bit it yesterday doing just that. )*(&#$@#%$ road rash is killing me.

Worst-case scenario would have been a long line of cars coming up the road behind a fat semi in the other lane.
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Old 03-23-06, 01:02 PM
  #115  
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Originally Posted by sleepystarz


LOL, obviously you haven't crashed that much (which you already pointed out), which explains your fear and absent understanding of being able to relax. It might seem impossible for you to relax when you crash because you get really scared and just want to pee your pants and stiffen up like a board..... but believe me when I say it's POSSIBLE to relax, even if you know the crash is coming.

Sorry, but I've crashed so many more times than you have and without a doubt stand behind my statement of RELAXING when you crash. My friend who had the same outlook as you ALMOST DIED during a crash and I was right behind him. It wasn't pretty and he even tells me to this day that he tensed up too much. Because of his stiffening up, his shoulder was pulled right out of his collarbone along with some other rather serious results. One crash out of hundreds of races doesn't qualify you to tell others this BS, it's simply not true, you can relax during a crash even if you know it's coming.

You know the stories of people that fall from really high places and survive? It's usually because they pass out before hitting the ground, causing them to be completely relaxed so they don't tranfer all that shock through their body and break every bone.

I'm continuing to respond to your posts because I don't want others to think this... don't believe that it's impossible to relax people. Take it from someone who has countless crashes with results that were always better when relaxed, and always worse when scared and stiff. Sure PATENTCAD, maybe you're an outstanding rider because you've only crashed once out of hundreds of races, but I can hold my own on my bike and crashing was the only way I was able to learn from my mistakes and become a professional skateboarder and snowboarder.... Professionals in most extreme sports and even cycling have experienced a large number of crashes and learned from them.

Please don't misguide people on such an important subject, this is something close to my heart because of personal experiences and I don't want others to get the wrong info.

Billy
Boy is this preposterous. Good grief what a ridiculous post. The 'wrong info'? That when you crash you're on the ground 90% of the time before you realize what's happening? That's just the way it is in my experience. And if you've crashed as much as you say you have - you're a scary cyclist. Jeez, stay away from me, please. I don't LIKE crashing. I crashed 5x in 15 years, and that included constant racing.

How about how to AVOID CRASHING? By riding at the front when you're racing or on a fast group ride, being alert, riding defensively and learning how to spot squirrely riders - and steering CLEAR of them before they bring you down too. I'll tell you what: you KEEP on crashing and employing your black belt zen-master crash techniques, and I'll ride the way I ride. Upright. Well, 99.9% of the time anyway.

I'll tell you what: do a poll of people who have crashed. Ask them:

• Were you down before you realized what was happening? (90% will say 'yes')

• Could you 'relax' before a high speed bicycle crash? (90% of them will say 'no')

Because most people aren't idiots. MOST people. But this is cycling, so the bonehead % is a bit of the charts.

Last edited by patentcad; 03-23-06 at 01:09 PM.
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