Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

road cycling and repetitive stess injury?

Notices
Road Cycling It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle. -- Ernest Hemingway

road cycling and repetitive stess injury?

Old 01-24-06, 10:35 PM
  #1  
wonderboy
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 90
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
road cycling and repetitive stess injury?

about a year or so into taking up road cycling, just as I was really gaining steam, I developed hand/wrist tendonitis from computing at work. It has made cycling difficult at best. At the moment I am pretty much relegated to only using aerobars on the trainer; riding outside tends to flare up my hands.

Anyone else dealt with something similar? Any advice on bike setup or other measures to help? It would seem that the less weight I can support on my hands, the better - I've got my saddle all the way back, and the bars as high as possible using a steer tube extender. Also working on lower back/ ab strength.

Thanks.
wonderboy is offline  
Old 01-24-06, 10:42 PM
  #2  
thebankman
Stooge
 
thebankman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Bay Area
Posts: 846

Bikes: one of each

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
i've got tendonitis (tendonopathy my doctor told me today) in one shoulder from a previous accident. switching between different hand positions and having a bike that fits properly helps a lot. also occasionally taking that bad side's hand off the bar seems to help with pain management. also switching between drop bars and upright bar bikes every couple days lets the shoulder rest but isn't an option for everyone. ultimately, cortizone shots in the shoulder have not eliminated pain and surgery is the next step toward recovery. unfortunately surgery is risky and not a preferred option as it may cause more problems in the future.

perhaps try taking weight off your palms or gripping lightly on the bars could help? core strength does help you pull your body up without using your hands and arms.

why is the saddle way back?
thebankman is offline  
Old 01-24-06, 10:47 PM
  #3  
wonderboy
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 90
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
saddle further back = more weight borne on rear, less on hands.
wonderboy is offline  
Old 01-24-06, 11:21 PM
  #4  
Stv
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: AJAX not the soap, Canada
Posts: 296

Bikes: 05 Specialized"Roubaix" Campy 10spd.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Me thinks they call your repetitive strain malady "Carpal Tunnel Syndrome". I've had several relatively mild cases over the years from computer over-use also. I was lucky. In my case, I just purchased a "wireless mouse" and used the opposite hand until the damaged hand/wrist recovered. I also use 3M Gel wrist support pads to rest my mouseing hand on. I've seen much worse cases than mine, like my wife had (typing) and also a neighbour (painter) who was off work for many years because of it. Hope yours is not too severe.

Last winter, from Ice Curling of all the ^#*%ing things, I got a very nasty case of tendinitis in the left shoulder, right down through the deltoid and into the bicep. A nasty red track and inflamed, I could barely lift a cup of coffee it was so debilitating. The doctor refused to give me cortisone shots because of the damage they can do and instead prescribe anti-inflammatory drugs, which were absolutely useless. I was in a lot of pain and very tender and sore to the touch. Luckily it was winter and I had yet to return to cycling, but still a year later it mildly flares up now and then from over use in the gym.

Anyways, for treatment on my own, I sought the immediate services from a licenced "sports" massage therapist working out of a chiropractors office. I saw him on a weekly basis and for months. (Not $ cheap) The deep muscle work was almost as intensely painful but he did some wondrous stuff that eventually got me functioning again and with no drugs or needles or surgery.

No probs on the bike now ether.

Give that a shot before the knife.

And ......... Good luck.

Last edited by Stv; 01-24-06 at 11:42 PM.
Stv is offline  
Old 01-25-06, 06:19 AM
  #5  
patentcad
Peloton Shelter Dog
 
patentcad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Chester, NY
Posts: 90,446

Bikes: 2017 Scott Foil, 2016 Scott Addict SL, 2018 Santa Cruz Blur CC MTB

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1065 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
My repetitive stress injury from cycling - piriformis syndrome - is considerably more debilitating than a hand/wrist issue (long story). But if there's one weak link in this 'cycling is a low impact sport with few injuries' thing it's repetitive stress. It can impact low back, neck, shoulders, hands, wrists. We spend hours daily doing the same thing and if your body is injured, it can be very frustrating.

It would seem that going to a more upright riding position, shifting the weight back on your pelvis and off the handlebars might be the way to go. But only until your hand/wrist issue improves. Long term a more upright position could potentially create other problems in your pelvis/back. But you deal with these things one injury at a time. Good luck and I hope you find a way out of your pain. I'm dealing with mine a day at a time. But cycling generally helps - which is extremely ironic since cycling probably caused my chronic pain in the first place. I'd go to a doctor about this but their cluelessness on this issue is hard to describe.
patentcad is offline  
Old 01-25-06, 06:31 AM
  #6  
maximum01
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Scottish Highlands
Posts: 273

Bikes: Fuji Roubaix Pro 2005 racer, Rideback Horozon audax/tourer

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've had a tennis elbow and cycling knee in the past and have been told a whole load of rubbish from various people who are supposedly qualified.

I've learnt from experience that the best way to manage the above problems is: resistance weight training and lots of it.

Do wrist lifts with a free weight over and over...build the strength back into your wrists. I guarantee you this will work wonders.
maximum01 is offline  
Old 01-25-06, 07:57 AM
  #7  
crash66
Lucky 47
 
crash66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: The past
Posts: 283

Bikes: 2005 Specialized Allez Elite

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Wow--something I can actually respond to in an authoritative manner.

First, sorry to hear about your condition. As you can see from my username, I crashed early on in my attempts to get back into cycling. Aug of 04, to be exact (17 months and counting), and broke both radial heads (elbows) and right wrist. Since then, I'm dealing with RSI from computer keyboard/mouse use at work. Probably not carpal tunnel, more like massive tennis elbow that might have migrated into radial tunnel syndrome. Had a bad bout of it exactly a year ago, which I got through with progressive resistance exercises for tennis elbow. Took about 3-4 months, found the exercises on the web. Problem was, I didn't keep up with them when I felt better, then was off work for 6 weeks between jobs. Add in moving into a new house, doing some major landscaping, and starting the new job, and here I am with round two of RSI. Guess my forearms just atrophied, though I thought getting back in the gym and doing my normal lifting would keep them fit, which it did not. I've discovered that rehab really is a life-long commitment once you get RSI. This bout is worse, and it has a "nervy" component that the first bout didn't have. I'm pretty scared about my working future, and I haven't been able to ride since the 6-8 times I rode back in the summer when I was feeling quite well (before the new job.)

I would say a couple things to you. Everything I have read suggests that RSI is not a tendonitis, but rather a tendinosis. -itis means inflammation. When you have this condition for months, there is no longer any inflammation (that lasts the first week, max.) We have chronic breakdown of tendon tissue on a cellular level, which eventually stops trying to repair itself. Do a google search on "tendinosis" and "tennis elbow exercises" or similar, and work up a rehab routine. Or, get a referral (if you need one) to a physical therapist. "Recovery" will take 3-6 months potentially, and will be agonizingly slow, but building up enough good tissue, and stretching out the scarring, will be what gets you over this. But you must keep it up as long as you continue to do the things that aggravate your condition (work, cycling, etc...) People evidently never really get over this 100%, so basically what we hope for is to keep it at bay, which is what constant rehab will do. Since this isn't really an inflammatory condition, anti-inflam med's dont do anything. I've only found that producing new stronger tissue through the rehab is what settles my pain down. Imagine 4 months+ of constant burning/aching pain in both forearms, 24/7. This has only subsided in the last 2 weeks, and it's because my new round of rehab and PT massage is finally taking hold. I would suggest to you getting your situation under control before doing anything on a bike. Don't even use the trainer, and don't lean on your forearms on the aero bars. Any king of static tension can prolong your symptoms.

I'm hoping that I'll actually be able to ride again some day, but for now I'm concentrating on getting to the point where I'm not worried about losing my livelihood over this. Then we'll worry about cycling again.

PM me and I'll answer any other questions you might have as best I can from my own experience. I can send you a rehab routine that has helped me. Best of luck.
crash66 is offline  
Old 01-25-06, 08:24 AM
  #8  
DamnRock
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 167
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I had back and wrist problems when i first started riding... both MTB and Road bikes... and I had wrist problems years ago when I started riding a motorcycle (sport bike)...

Aside from the obvious of taking it easy for a bit to let it go away... what I think has helped me the most is strengthening my mid section. I go to the gym 3 times a week and no matter what I plan to work that day, I ALWAYS do crunches, back and side lifts (the ones where you're laying on the bench and raise your upper body up/down bending at the waist). This has significantly strengthened my midsection which has made me rely much less on my hands to support my upper body... my stomach/back does more of the work and my hands/wrists don't get sore like they used to.

Rock
DamnRock is offline  
Old 01-25-06, 03:46 PM
  #9  
Enthalpic
Killing Rabbits
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 5,453
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 161 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Vitamin B6 (best with other B vits), vitamin E and fish oils can help a little if you are prone to tendonitis injuries.
Enthalpic is offline  
Old 01-25-06, 04:30 PM
  #10  
EURO
My toilet-Floyd's future
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,776
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Any advice on bike setup or other measures to help?
If your bike is set up right, and you are flexible enough for your set up, you really shouldn't be putting more than 20% of your upper body weight through your hands. Sounds to me like you are set up wrong.


saddle further back = more weight borne on rear, less on hands.
Arrrrrg!!! There it is again! NO NO NO NO NO NO NO! Never adjust your seat position to correct problems with the upper body! You are just going to get problems with your lower body instead!!
EURO is offline  
Old 01-26-06, 11:13 PM
  #11  
wonderboy
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 90
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
thanks all for advice - i have already been seeing doctor/PT for some time to fix the hand issue - but I'm asking more specifically about bike setup things I can do to help get me riding more/longer. I am 6'5" and therefore a candidate for a custom frame - I've saved the money but want to wait til the hand situation improves before dropping that much money. that frame will likely have a very tall head tube and a quite relaxed seat angle.

Any other thoughts?
wonderboy is offline  
Old 01-27-06, 04:30 AM
  #12  
roadwarrior
Senior Member
 
roadwarrior's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Someplace trying to figure it out
Posts: 10,651

Bikes: Cannondale EVO, CAAD9, Giant cross bike.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by wonderboy
saddle further back = more weight borne on rear, less on hands.
Man...where do these urban legends start?

When you shift like this, you change your pedal stroke and create big problems for your hips, knees, and back.
Note that the repetitive motion issues with cycling are due to PEDALING...on a 2 hour ride at an 80 RPM average, that's 9,600 revolutions. After a few days of that with your setup, you will be in trouble.

Bike setup is everything. Much of what I read out here in physical problems people have is due to a bad setup.

If you don't know what you are doing, really, see a professional.

I noted your comment about custom...make sure that the fitter is somehow certified or trained on how to do fittings....if they fit you with a tape measure, run, quickly...also, they need to spend time with you learing about your physical issues and the type of riding you want to do...for example, if relaxed club type riding is your pleasure, then the manufacturer should tune the frame for that type of riding. The setup will have a more relaxed geometry, longer chain stays, more relaxed steering setup, taller head tube for starters.
If you want some really good info, try the Serotta website. The "Fit and Sizing" button on the left side will get you started.
FYI...a typical custom fitting at our place takes close to three hours.

Last edited by roadwarrior; 01-27-06 at 04:41 AM.
roadwarrior is offline  
Old 01-27-06, 07:02 AM
  #13  
Applehead57
slower than you
 
Applehead57's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: dairy country NY
Posts: 652

Bikes: Gunnar Road Sport, peugeot UO-10

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by wonderboy
saddle further back = more weight borne on rear, less on hands.
Don't you mean that the other way around? It's just the opposite as I see it. I feel you're more stretched out that way and you're going to put more stress on your hands.

My solution would be to move the seat up, raise stem height, wear the best padded gloves you can and wrap your handlebars in vibration absorbing material.

My latest brilliant idea was to take a computer mouse pad, the rubber neoprene type, cut it into a "J" shape and place it under my handlebar wrap. It sounds like a good idea, cheap enough, but after a year of using it, I'm not exactly sure it made a difference or not.
Applehead57 is offline  
Old 01-27-06, 07:54 AM
  #14  
'nother
semifreddo amartuerer
 
'nother's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Northern CA
Posts: 4,599

Bikes: several

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by wonderboy
about a year or so into taking up road cycling, just as I was really gaining steam, I developed hand/wrist tendonitis from computing at work. It has made cycling difficult at best. At the moment I am pretty much relegated to only using aerobars on the trainer; riding outside tends to flare up my hands.

Anyone else dealt with something similar? Any advice on bike setup or other measures to help? It would seem that the less weight I can support on my hands, the better - I've got my saddle all the way back, and the bars as high as possible using a steer tube extender. Also working on lower back/ ab strength.

Thanks.
Heh. Very similar story here. I play (acoustic/upright) bass, work on a computer all day, and ride my bike 100+ miles/week. Less than a year into cycling, I developed fairly severe tennis elbow. I ended up seeing a physical therapist which was very helpful. Unfortunately the first bit involved staying off the bike completely for 2 weeks (minimum), as well as cutting back on work, getting a nice new ergo keyboard/mouse/etc., and not playing bass. I also wore a wrist brace for a while.

As far as bike setup, I added some "cross" brake levers, which added a hand position which I think did help ease fatigue from braking (on long descents). But I think what really helped was the strength-building exercises and stretches. Basically my arms were very weak and probably at the limit with just work + playing bass . . . cycling put it over the top. I doubt that any changes to the bike setup would have made much difference; it was a case of too much, too soon. Anyway: after about a month of PT I felt pretty much back to normal.

That was about 1 year ago and (knock on wood) I have not had any problems since. Now I'm careful to listen to my body while working or doing any other activity and if it's telling me I need to back off, I do. And I keep up on the stretches, etc.
'nother is offline  
Old 01-27-06, 12:14 PM
  #15  
hiracer
Hiracer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 460

Bikes: Bacchetta Aero, Bacchetta Strada, Diamondback MTB, Lemond Sarthe DF

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by EURO
Arrrrrg!!! There it is again! NO NO NO NO NO NO NO! Never adjust your seat position to correct problems with the upper body! You are just going to get problems with your lower body instead!!
Elaborate and explain, please.

If seat-BB orientation is important separate and apart from balancing weight bearing points, why don't recumbent riders have debilitating problems? Their seat-BB orientation is way out of wack. Yet they can easily ride farther with less problems of the nature referenced above and with less problems on the lower half of the body too.

Most people believe that seat-BB orientation on uprights is ONLY about balancing weight bearing points. As recumbents show, seat-bb orientation is irrelevent for healthy power production.

Last edited by hiracer; 01-27-06 at 12:27 PM.
hiracer is offline  
Old 01-27-06, 12:37 PM
  #16  
Enthalpic
Killing Rabbits
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 5,453
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 161 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
The whole situation is just rotated for a recumbent. You still want close to KOPS in the direction of greatest force production; which in this case is just not vertical. Yes, I know you can't rotate gravity but thats why recumbants have a back on the seat to replace the missing opposing force. EURO is still right in that you set up the feet first and then adjust for reach.
Enthalpic is offline  
Old 01-27-06, 12:57 PM
  #17  
hiracer
Hiracer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 460

Bikes: Bacchetta Aero, Bacchetta Strada, Diamondback MTB, Lemond Sarthe DF

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Enthalpic
The whole situation is just rotated for a recumbent. You still want close to KOPS in the direction of greatest force production; which in this case is just not vertical. Yes, I know you can't rotate gravity but thats why recumbants have a back on the seat to replace the missing opposing force. EURO is still right in that you set up the feet first and then adjust for reach.
How do you do KOPS in a non-vertical orientation? You ALWAYS have KOPS "in the direction of greatest force production" regardless of seat-bb orientation. I don't understand what you are saying. When do you not have KOPS "in the direction of the greatest force production?"

I agree that you have to set up lower body first, and then reach.

It's this business that fore and aft saddle position relates to something other than balancing three weight bearing points that I don't understand.

Last edited by hiracer; 01-27-06 at 01:15 PM.
hiracer is offline  
Old 01-27-06, 01:11 PM
  #18  
thebankman
Stooge
 
thebankman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Bay Area
Posts: 846

Bikes: one of each

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've been through physical therapy for tendonitis. In conjunction with icing the area in question, this only mildly alleviated pain. While gaining full range of motion was the first priority (accomplished in about a month I think) the problem of pain was still there. The pain went down with PT but never went completely away when moving the shoulder with tendon problems out or up over the head.

The best thing you can do is find someone to find the bike fit that meets all your requirements. They need to take your specific ailments and large frame into consideration so you can get a bike that is comfortable and doesn't cause you more pain.

Cheers, Al
thebankman is offline  
Old 01-27-06, 01:25 PM
  #19  
hiracer
Hiracer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 460

Bikes: Bacchetta Aero, Bacchetta Strada, Diamondback MTB, Lemond Sarthe DF

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Let me restate my question.

Take your most perfect upright body position on the bike.

Now swap out your stem, change seapost length, move seat forward, etc, etc. so that the exact same body position relative to the BB has been rotated around the BB so that you are leaning farther forward and down.

Now do the same, but rotate the body position around the BB backwards a bit.

The relationship of all parts of the body to the BB is exactly the same in all three positions, by definition. What has changed is the balance. Different parts of the body are counteracting gravity's load differently in each of the three positions. I understand that this change in balance might lead to repetitive injuries. What I don't understand is the risk of OTHER injuries not related to change in balance. I don't see a risk of repetitive injuries simply because KOPS has been abandoned. The body's position relative to pedal force vectors is the same in all three positions.

* * *

Wonderboy. I hope my illustration here might provide some light on how to take weight off your hands. More than one rider has gone to recumbents because of medical problems.

And if Euro was complaining that you can't make a change in fore-aft seat position without taking into account how it affects your reach, I agree. But I understood it to mean more than that, i.e., the reference to lower body problems.

Last edited by hiracer; 01-27-06 at 01:45 PM.
hiracer is offline  
Old 01-27-06, 01:51 PM
  #20  
hiracer
Hiracer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 460

Bikes: Bacchetta Aero, Bacchetta Strada, Diamondback MTB, Lemond Sarthe DF

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by wonderboy

Anyone else dealt with something similar?
Thanks.
Actually, yes. I play classical guitar, or I should say I try to play classical guitar. I had some pain in my left wrist for about four weeks. I got it to go way by cutting back on my practice, and avoiding certain songs that were obviously stressful. Riding the road bike made it worse, but I'm lucky in that I ride 50/50 upright and recumbent. So, I just rode one of my recumbents for a bit while the wrist recovered. My condition was not serious and the recovery appears to have been rather quick.
hiracer is offline  
Old 01-27-06, 03:39 PM
  #21  
Enthalpic
Killing Rabbits
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 5,453
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 161 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Ok max force comes at about the 9 o' clock position for a road bike. See how moving the seat forwards or backwards changes the angle the knee is at. Now if you rotate the best fit 90 degrees counterclockwise (now max force at about 12 o clock keeping the same knee angle), without a backrest a real hard push on the pedal would throw him off the back of the bike. So what happens is people screw with that knee angle causing problems.

Nice drawing eh?
Attached Images
File Type: bmp
fore aft.bmp (21.0 KB, 9 views)
Enthalpic is offline  
Old 01-27-06, 05:49 PM
  #22  
hiracer
Hiracer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 460

Bikes: Bacchetta Aero, Bacchetta Strada, Diamondback MTB, Lemond Sarthe DF

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Enthalpic
Ok max force comes at about the 9 o' clock position for a road bike. See how moving the seat forwards or backwards changes the angle the knee is at. Now if you rotate the best fit 90 degrees counterclockwise (now max force at about 12 o clock keeping the same knee angle), without a backrest a real hard push on the pedal would throw him off the back of the bike. So what happens is people screw with that knee angle causing problems.

Nice drawing eh?
As you rotate the seat around the BB, the point of max force changes too. To be accurate, you need to change the pedal position to correlate to the new max force position. When you take that into account, the knee angle stays the same.

Your drawing is analogous to the pedal stroke, i.e., the leg pushing the pedal around the BB, except you have kept the pedal in the same position and instead moved the seat about the BB.

Also, your drawing involves different seat-to-pedal distances, and we all know what happens when you mess with that, which certainly will change knee angles.

I admit it, however, you draw better than me.

Last edited by hiracer; 01-27-06 at 05:59 PM.
hiracer is offline  
Old 02-13-06, 11:07 AM
  #23  
Shorty
Riding is Praying
 
Shorty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Boston
Posts: 206

Bikes: Jamis Nova, Fisher Tassajara, Indy Fab Crown Jewel; Titan NOS fixed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...ight=neck+pain

I found this thread handy too.

PS: can anyone discribe the PT exercises they have been doing for their neck problems? I would like to give them a try.
Shorty is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.