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wow... steel is real!

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wow... steel is real!

Old 11-12-02, 03:32 PM
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wow... steel is real!

I know this thread is done to death, but after rebuilding my dad's old (70's) motobecane, to a commuter and adding some new parts (such as new rims and tires) I went for my first ride. I'd only ridden on steel once before, but I never got a chance to really test it, boy am I surprised on how the ride is.... I'm not sure how to describe it, but the road seems smoother on steel, and it seems to be a quieter bike... al makes noise? I may just convert my other road bike with a steel frame
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Old 11-12-02, 04:26 PM
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And, new steel can be even better.
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Old 11-12-02, 06:33 PM
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I wholeheartedly agree with Pokey.
mid to late 90's steel (or newer) has to be
ridden to be appreciated.
That said, there is something magic (mojo?)
about old lugged steel frames.

Marty
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Old 11-12-02, 07:09 PM
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I love my 1991 Columbus SL frame.
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Old 11-12-02, 07:22 PM
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I got a 78 model bianchi steel, and an alloy canodale. riding steel is smoother although is quite hevy, but the feel is really good.
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Old 11-12-02, 08:42 PM
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Originally posted by abongon
I got a 78 model bianchi steel, and an alloy canodale. riding steel is smoother although is quite hevy, but the feel is really good.
My Lemond BA Reynolds 853 frame weighs under 3 pounds. How much lighter can you get?
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Old 11-12-02, 08:47 PM
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My LeMond Poprad with 853 Steel is 2 to 5 lbs heavier than the LeMond titanium bike (Te Te or something). I love the ride of steel. However, my next bike will be a titanium bike.

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Old 11-13-02, 02:49 AM
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And, as I have just learned in my research on a new frame, steel is much more environmentally friendly than Aluminum.

Al requires an enormous amount of energy to turn it from ore into usable metal--much more so than steel. (No, you can't use recycled Al for building bikes--it has to be virgin stuff.) Granted one owns a bike for a long time, so the use of it for a bike frame might still be justified. But, by most accounts steel will endure longer than Al.

I am pretty convinced that I'll buy a steel frame. I only regret that I have never owned Al, Ti, or Carbon--I want to have at least tried them. But, one doesn't throw down a couple of grand just to try something out.

Cheers,
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Old 11-13-02, 06:43 AM
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Well, what can I say? All I ride are old lugged steel frames. My Chicago-built Paramount is 26 years old, and my Waterford-built Paramount turn 13 this month!

Personally, I love my steel frames. I had a chance to ride a Ti bike once, but not really enough to compare it's ride, and I have never been on AL at all. I have a good friend who loves his AL bike, but for me, I'll stick with my steel!
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Old 11-13-02, 09:00 AM
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Not to mention, you can't change the traffic light on a Ti or Al or CF bike
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Old 11-13-02, 09:04 AM
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Originally posted by DnvrFox


My Lemond BA Reynolds 853 frame weighs under 3 pounds. How much lighter can you get?
That's the biggest load of applesauce I have seen for awhile. Bet if it's a normal size, it does not get under 4 pounds for the frame alone.

Last edited by pokey; 11-13-02 at 09:07 AM.
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Old 11-13-02, 09:40 AM
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Are you planning to race Vegas?
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Old 11-13-02, 05:55 PM
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Originally posted by fubar5
Are you planning to race Vegas?

yes, in fact I'm setting up a training program now, to do some in feb or march (cat 5, as I'm a noob), but still have to build up the miles and such.
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Old 11-16-02, 10:42 PM
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Originally posted by VegasCyclist



yes, in fact I'm setting up a training program now, to do some in feb or march (cat 5, as I'm a noob), but still have to build up the miles and such.
Coolio. What bike?
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Old 11-16-02, 10:51 PM
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Glad to hear of your steel enlightenment.

Mine came from a yard sale bike. Was riding a Cannondale road bike and a GT alu MTB and saw an old Raleigh in great shape. Got it for $35.00 USD. I replaced the chain and brake pads and made it my commuter. It became a favorite of mine.

Not that I am demeaning other frame materials but steel frames really are it for me now.

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Old 11-17-02, 10:16 AM
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Originally posted by VegasCyclist
it seems to be a quieter bike... al makes noise
No first-hand experience with al, but the noise may be other things. The big noisemakers on my Ti bike are carbon fork roadbuzz and clattering Ultegra STI shifters. After using it exclusively for rec rides for over a year, I dropped back to my Bianchi w/downtube shifters and steel unicrown fork and the first thing I noticed was the pleasant absence of racket.
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Old 11-17-02, 11:29 AM
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Originally posted by pokey
That's the biggest load of applesauce I have seen for awhile. Bet if it's a normal size, it does not get under 4 pounds for the frame alone.
Okay, I will give you a pound. That is what I read somewhere, but can't find it on the Lemond Specs page. In any event, it is a nice light bike. I will take 4 pounds any day for my kind of riding.
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Old 11-17-02, 04:56 PM
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Originally posted by roadbuzz
No first-hand experience with al, but the noise may be other things. The big noisemakers on my Ti bike are carbon fork roadbuzz and clattering Ultegra STI shifters. After using it exclusively for rec rides for over a year, I dropped back to my Bianchi w/downtube shifters and steel unicrown fork and the first thing I noticed was the pleasant absence of racket.
you might be right considering, that it has steel forks, and friction shifting... in any rate it sure is fun to ride
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Old 02-22-03, 02:11 PM
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Just weighed my '87 Paramount at the LBS on their digial scale and it weighed 20.3 pounds. That is with the Armadillo tires, which must be at least the 0.3. Also has a triple crankset. With racing tires and double crank the bike would weight just under 20 pounds. Since I could lose another 20 myself, I think the bike is in great shape. We did this weighing before and after switching to a carbon fork. Lost a whole 0.2 pounds. Big deal. If the snow ever melts it will be interesting to contrast the ride with the stock steel fork.

There are a bunch of sub-4 pound steel frames out there now. Some are very close to 3 pounds. New TIG welding and tubing technology and designs are responsible for same. Check out Waterford Bikes and some of the Italian brands we don't hear much about over here (Scapin, Olmo, Pinarello, etc.) and also Guru, a relatively new Canadian brand for ultra-lightweight steel rides. All use the new tube sets from Columbus, Dedacciaci (sp?) and True Temper. Waterford Bikes is the original Schwinn Waterford plant where all Paramounts from the late 70's on were fabricated. Still owned and operated by Richard Schwinn and company.

But for me, nothing will ever beat a lugged steel frame. A ride like no other. Comfortable, fast, stable. Class of the field.
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Old 02-22-03, 06:02 PM
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Steel is real and the most comfortable ride in my opinion. I always feel like Al or CF frames need a shock do to the abuse you take. Being from Northern Indiana the roads were never the exactly what you called smooth. I'm checking out GVH Bikes and hope to pick up a new STEEL beauty by the end of the year.

THE NEW STEEL

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Old 02-22-03, 06:52 PM
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I can feel the difference between my steel roadbike and my al hardtail mtb. The roadbike despite the huge difference in tires is so much smoother. I was considering a new roadbike as the Suntour parts I have are impossible to get parts for (like when I need a new cluster, and I would like STI), but I may just buy a groupset and upgrade this frame. That, and the fact that I will be saving a long time to afford the sort of bike that I would like.
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Old 02-22-03, 06:59 PM
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Originally posted by RunYun
I'm checking out GVH Bikes and hope to pick up a new STEEL beauty by the end of the year.
GVH has some good service, I and two of my friends have picked up frames from him.
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Old 02-23-03, 09:52 AM
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I love my Steelman ( www.steelmancycles.com ) -like stereo equipment i try to get the best performance for the least buck. so i buy high quality, more expensive stuff and keep it for a long time. My Steelman SR525 is now 4.5 years and 14,000 miles old. never a creak or an unscheduled maintanence from it or the ultegra stuff on it.

BTW: straight steel forks are the real deal as well. Straight forks are sexy and don't need much design to 'dampen'
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Old 02-23-03, 01:24 PM
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I would love to have a steel road frame. And I'm really not worried about the rust issue- that is more of a perceived problem than a real problem. Modern steel resists rust better than ever and you can spray the inside with rust inhibitor. A good frame will last 30+ years.
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Old 02-25-03, 11:27 AM
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I've been on alu for the last 4 years and like the stiffness. I might end up trying ti next time, the way it looks now, but I'm in no hurry to get a new frame. But, I will say that my steel mountain bike abso-freakin-lutely rocks. I love it. I've thought about replacing her, but can't do it because she's so good on the trail. I don't ride off road as much as I'd like, but I love it when I do because of that frame.
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