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What level of training do I REALLY need for a century.

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What level of training do I REALLY need for a century.

Old 03-14-06, 03:57 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by zimbo
You're kidding, right? If the original poster has a family then I can totally understand him being able to schedule a one-time six hour event but not necessarily being able to spend that much time away every weekend.

--Steve
+1

Even if it is to just say "I rode a century"...
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Old 03-14-06, 04:21 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by CardiacKid
I'm confused. If you don't have the time to do 60 miles on a Saturday, how do you have the time to do 100 miles.
Those of us with families are happy (and lucky) to get out for 3-4 hours at a time! Longer events need some additional planning if one hopes to maintain a happy homelife!
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Old 03-14-06, 04:55 PM
  #28  
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I didn't say every weekend, I said 2 days this year.
When I go out for a 40 mile ride at dawn, my family is usually eating breakfast when I am getting home.
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Old 03-14-06, 05:17 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by CardiacKid
I didn't say every weekend, I said 2 days this year.
When I go out for a 40 mile ride at dawn, my family is usually eating breakfast when I am getting home.
And where did you say "2 days this year"? Seems you were quick to chastise his ride time.
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Old 03-14-06, 05:28 PM
  #30  
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Two things going on here:

1. Time is an issue. I too want to attempt my first century this coming season, but I do not have the time to put in a ton of miles to ramp up to it. And I'm not a father. I AM a husband, and have two houses/landscapes to maintain. You have to spend your time wisely.

2. If you really wanted to make the effort, I guess all of us could somehow, someway squeeze in more miles by getting up earlier or giving up other things. But my point is that I choose not to do that. Cycling is very important to me, but it is not the end-all. I have other things I enjoy doing too much to give up, including my wife!

So I understand totally what the OP is asking about in this thread. I'm in the same boat....and we're wondering how tough it will be to get to this magical (for whatever reason) 100-mile ride accomplishment when you usually ride/train at half or less that distance.

Can it be done that way without killing yourself? I hope so....because I'm going to try.
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Old 03-14-06, 05:43 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Dial_tone
Suck a wheel every chance you get, even if it's just 50 meters, unless it puts you over 80% max HR.
If you're real sneaky about the wheel sucking, it'll be more fun too. Next week we'll get to find out whose wheel you were sucking when they complain about people that draft without asking.
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Old 03-14-06, 05:43 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by curiouskid55
Do the math. 100 divided by 20 is 5. By 18 is 5.5. By 15 is 6.6. And that doesnt include at least a couple of decent breaks. Are you prepared to spend that much time in the saddle? For me its not the legs its the butt that goes first. The only way to get your butt used to long hours in the saddle is to spend long hours in the saddle.
If you are comfortable in the saddle on your long rides you will probably do fine.
+1.

timmhaan, offers excellent experience. But you need to get some experience with a couple of 4hr rides first. Else, butt and lowerback, heck everything will ache big time by 70miles forcing you to quit and that is not a good first experience.
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Old 03-14-06, 05:54 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by Hipcycler
So I understand totally what the OP is asking about in this thread. I'm in the same boat....and we're wondering how tough it will be to get to this magical (for whatever reason) 100-mile ride accomplishment when you usually ride/train at half or less that distance.

Can it be done that way without killing yourself? I hope so....because I'm going to try.
I think what some people have said hits the nail on the head. If you want to experience a century with more pain, train less. Less pain, train more.

In the world of endurance events, many people would put a century ride in the league of a marathon. It's the 4+ hour event for a cyclist. You wouldn't expect to run a marathon without putting your body through long distance running. Could you? Sure. I did it one year. My knees took nearly 4 months to forgive me.

After having ridden a number of centuries, I now don't really consider them the be-all-end-all. But I ride 10 hours a week with at least one 120k+ day each week. I have a lady friend who runs 2 marathons a year and kinda laughs at everyone that thinks she's crazy. But, she also runs to include one 14+ mile run each week.

Just because your legs can go around in a circle a few thousand times to get you 40 miles, doesn't mean little things aren't going to hurt when you get to mile 45, and hurt a lot more when you get to mile 80. My clipless cleat position could be anywhere for 20 miles, and it wouldn't matter. When I get to around mile 30 on a ride, I notice it's weird. If I go over 50 miles with the cleats off too much, my knees start telling me. This is just an example of what you want to be prepared for.

Nutrition: You can have crap nutrition for 50 miles and do ok if you're biking often. I don't think that's the same for 100 miles - and the list of people that said "centuries are about eating" in all of the threads are going to support this argument.

If it's your first time, you should treat a century like you would treat a marathon. Once you've gotten the hang of it, you may no longer consider those two things on equal footing.

Anyway, that's my $.02
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Old 03-14-06, 05:59 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by NomadVW
...If it's your first time, you should treat a century like you would treat a marathon. Once you've gotten the hang of it, you may no longer consider those two things on equal footing.
True, also been discussed here earlier I remember.

Marathons are more like world championship road races 260/275km heavy effort events!
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Old 03-14-06, 06:13 PM
  #35  
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Ahh...the whole time argument....

The woman: "You sure spend a lot of time on your bike, you know."
Me: "Well, you don't ride 750 miles in 3 days by sitting on the couch watching TV. Get used to it."

She hasn't complained since .
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Old 03-14-06, 07:06 PM
  #36  
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My wife did her first century last Saturday, at age 66, with me on our tandem. We have been riding together 50-70 miles per week since mid-Jan with a metric century 3 weeks ago. I agree with the other comments that if you are doing 100 mi/week you should have no problem, but
-don't make any changes to your bike or riding position immediately before the ride
-begin eating pasta a couple days before
-begin hydrating yourself the day before
-have a bowl of oatmeal 2 hr before the ride
-drink 16oz water or energy drink 2 hr before the ride
-take a drink every 15 min in the ride
-at 20 miles eat an energy bar
-at 45 miles eat peanut butter and jelly sandwich or turkey sandwich
-at 65 miles eat a milky way bar
-at 85 miles energy bar plus electrolyte drink like Gu2O
After the halfway mark eat energy gel every 45-60 min

Drink, drink, drink and pace yourself. Aim at 16mph and do not exceed 80% max HR for extended periods.
You can do it and you will feel proud of yourself!!
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Old 03-14-06, 07:10 PM
  #37  
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This is an informative thread and the Ultracycling link posted above contains some excellent training tips and advice.

I will add this cautionary note, though, for anyone reading this now or in the future who comes at the century from the, "it's just 4 25-mile rides, 2 50-mile rides, etc." perspective. The century is a fundamentally different beast than n-number of shorter rides. In this case, the whole is much, much greater than the sum of its parts. I think Nomad VW gets at this point well, but it bears stressing.

I've introduced a lot of riders to their first-ever century. Of all of them, the one who did the best -- i.e., had the most fun and was in the best shape at the end of it -- was actually the weakest rider physically and was the slowest. But she had the right mental attitude, focused intensely on maintaining hydration and nutrition during the ride, focused on maintaining excellent posture on the bike, and had the most "base" miles in that season before attempting the century. She also had a number of rides longer than 50 miles under her belt.

The guy who did the worst -- i.e., suffered like a beaten, 3-legged dog during the ride -- was one of the strongest guys I've ever cycled with. Sprints at 40mph. An elite sprint and Olympic-distance triathlete. Legs the size of tree trunks. But his mental focus was out of whack, he didn't have respect for the ride or the terrain (pushed hard up the few hills in the early miles). He ended up riding the last hour at aqbout 10-12mph, looking and feeling like death. He'd done slews of rides 40 miles and shorter, and had a decent number of miles under his belt before the century, but he didn't show it the proper respect. As VW says, you can make huge mistakes on rides that are 2 hours long, but if you're going to be out there for 6 or 8 hours, your day better be pretty mistake-free. My friend made the mistake that another poster identified: the longer the ride, the less "fitness" in the traditional sense matters. Yeah, my buddy on paper is physically superior to me in every way. He could smoke me in a 20-mile time trial, no doubt. But over 100 miles, who is the "stronger" rider? Hint: I've ridden 10 centuries already in 2006 and he's ridden 2 centuries ever. Forget the focus on "fitness"; concentrate on getting your body and mind to adapt to spending time on the bike at any speed.

I don't doubt that there are guys out there who can just decide to do a century for the first time and who can go out and do it without ever experiencing a long (in my book, anything over 100 kilometers) ride. (Heck, I was one of those guys.) But they're very much the exception to the rule.

The minimum yardstick I use for advising friends on riding a first-ever flat century in good weather is that you ought to have a good base of general fitness, have 400 miles under your belt in the season, and have done one ride of 65 miles. Gospel? No, but I've never had a friend DNF a first century and all of them (even triathalon dude, in a masochistic sort of way) had a fun time. This is a totally doable program on a limited time budget.

Good luck, and I look forward to a lot of "my first century" ride reports this year!
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Old 03-14-06, 08:29 PM
  #38  
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1 long ride before (at least a week-10 days before) is a good idea. It'll give you a mental & physical picture of how your body and bike will feel on an extended ride. If family time is an issue, try to do a weekend ride starting very early (5-6am, your century will start early as well). If you keep up a 16mph average you'll get in a ton of miles before lunch. Plan on a big lunch and a couple of hours of staring into space afterwards.

Def. tune up your bike before the cenutry, sleep in the days leading up to it, and have a dinner the night before & a good breakfast the morning of.
Ride at a pace you're comfortable with. Remember to eat and drink during the ride. Save your push for the last 1/4 of the ride.
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Old 03-14-06, 08:46 PM
  #39  
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Ok - OP, I have the definitive answer for you: "You're good to go"

I did this century last April, and like you it was my first ever. Prior to that, my longest ride was 50 miles, with a smattering of 40, 30, and a whole bunch of 20 milers.

This particular ride, the Bike Around The Buttes, is scenic, well run, and FLAT. There is only one climb (see pic below), and it is even easier than it appears - if that's possible. You will engage this climb at right around 65 miles into the ride. The ONLY thing that will possibley make this ride tough for you is the wind. It can come up in the latter half of the day, and if it does you'll be heading more or less into it for the last 20 miles or so.

Just follow all the excellent advice given here - eat and hydrate properly, and pace yourself. Slow and steady wills out over pushing yourself and blowing up. There is a tendency for a first time century rider to hurry, as if it is a race. Resist this impulse - ride steady, and enjoy the spectacular surroundings. The Buttes are gorgeous this time of year. Figure you'll spend 6:30 - 7:00 saddle time. If you do it in less, good on you.

Hey - I'm probably going to be in on this ride myself. If you want to meet up, let me know.

The only climb:
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Old 03-14-06, 11:09 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by jimx200
And where did you say "2 days this year"? Seems you were quick to chastise his ride time.
Okay, let me get out my first grader's math book. Try a metric century first, then try a full century. 1+1=2
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Old 03-15-06, 12:15 AM
  #41  
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Thanks for all the info and advice. I get the idea that the purpose of putting in a few 60+ milers is more mental than physical -- just to know what's going to happen around that distance. I would like to know how my butt feels after that long. Right now it doesn't feel too bad after 30-40 miles. And I didn't mention I did a 50 miler over the summer and came away feeling pretty good. And that was before aero bars and a saddle upgrade. And I've had lots of 35 mile days if you count my commuting and then riding to go swim after work.

I do have a few weeks off after next week, so I can get in some long rides weather permitting.
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Old 03-15-06, 12:20 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by bigbossman
This particular ride, the Bike Around The Buttes, is scenic, well run, and FLAT. There is only one climb (see pic below), and it is even easier than it appears - if that's possible. You will engage this climb at right around 65 miles into the ride.
Climb? Where is it? That distant ridge on the horizon?
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Old 03-15-06, 01:16 AM
  #43  
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Here take a look at my article about riding a century:


http://www.machka.net/century.htm

It might help you prepare.


Also check out the Ultracycling site:

http://www.ultracycling.com/

There's lots of good advice there too.

All the best!
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Old 03-15-06, 07:12 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by zimbo
What has helped me has been to bring an iPod,
Please don't ever ride with these. It's such an unnecessary safety issue.
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Old 03-15-06, 07:27 AM
  #45  
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lets see, get up at 7am... what's it take to ride 60 miles, maybe 3 hours... you're done by 11am (factoring in getting ready, etc)... heck, on a saturday I don't even wake up till after noon, I think you could "sacrifice" and get up early and have a full day ahead after your ride. Now, yes, if you start out at noon, you waste from noon till 4pm and your day IS pretty much shot, but when I was training for my century ALL my saturday rides were started and finished BEFORE I typically would have been awake.

Either way, my training was like this... I started out riding in June, just 10 or 15 miles at a time, maybe twice a week. This was the first I'd ever ridden a road bike. I then started training for the century in late July leaving me with 8 weeks before the century. I rode tues/thurs/Sat, the tues went from 15 miles to 36 miles over th e8 weeks... the thursday was always about 15 miles but was faster and faster, starting from about 15mph average and finishing around 21mph average over the 8 weeks... and the Saturday rides went from about 20 miles to about 72 miles over the 8 weeks... gradually increasing each time. The 8th week dropped off to rest for the century. I'd say I ended up being the 1st or 2nd strongest rider in my group, but we took a casual pace and finished in 6 hours total.

That's my advice. I definitely wouldn't recommend going from 40 miles to 100 miles mainly because yea you will probably finish, but it will suck, your ass will hurt, your back will hurt, the century just won't be as enjoyable as it would be if you had trained longer/harder to get your endurance (both legs and other parts) up.

Also, the trick for me wasn't the riding so much as it was finding a combination of powerbars and drinks that worked and didn't make me feel sick when I was having a tough ride. I ended up with Accelerade and Snickers Endurance bars as my primary nutrition DURING RIDES.

Rock
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Old 03-15-06, 07:30 AM
  #46  
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ahh yea, seriously eat pasta the night before... go to Olive Garden and get their neverending pasta! Never have I enjoyed eating so much pasta as the night before the century when I could actually justify eating more than I normally would... liberating!

Rock
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Old 03-15-06, 08:37 AM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by NJWheelBuilder
Please don't ever ride with these. It's such an unnecessary safety issue.
Yes - and please don't drive with music turned up too loud - or worse, with your window down cause the wind noise certainly won't allow you to hear anything. In fact, I shouldn't ever drive another VW bus like my last one, cause I couldn't hear myself think inside that vehicle. And since the back window was boarded up, I'd never see if I was gonna get hit from behind in the rear view mirror.

digression occurs now. Good luck on your century!
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Old 03-15-06, 08:45 AM
  #48  
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You'll make it. However, the last twenty miles will hurt. Allocate the entire day to complete it. Your time for the last twenty miles may drop below 10 mph.
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