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track stands!

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track stands!

Old 04-19-06, 12:24 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by The Fixer
No need to analyze this from a practical point of view. Simply put, it's the cool factor....
+1
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Old 04-19-06, 12:30 PM
  #27  
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A track stand is the act of balancing on a bicycle while not moving forward.
Newcomers often want to learn this skill after observing how skilled riders
at traffic lights keep their feet on the pedals while waiting for the light
to change.

Skilled riders may show off their talents, track standing with no hands on
the handlebars while eating a banana -- using body weight and lean to
control the bicycle.

To initially learn this skill, try the following:

---Aim to track stand for just a second or two. Then try for 5 seconds; then
10.

---Find a slight uphill. We will use as an example the slope of a cambered
roadway. In North America,
this generally means you are on the right side of the road and your front
wheel will be pointed to the left.

---Focus 50 or more feet ahead, 5 feet up.

---Slowly stop the bicycle.

---Turn the front wheel toward the upslope, angled about 45 degrees.

---Shift your center of mass forward. Move forward on the saddle or move
forward and stand with knees bent.

---Shift your hips to the downslope side. In our North American example,
this is to the right.

---Keep cranks and pedals level (horizontal). The front crank, on the
upslope side, is approaching the 3 o'clock position. In our North American
example your left crank will be forward.

---Place your hands in the drops to start. Later you can have them on the
hoods.

---Pull slightly with your right hand.

---If you sense that you are falling toward the upslope, slightly relax
pressure on the forward pedal, slightly relax the pull with your right hand,
or center the wheel slightly.

---If you sense that you are falling toward the downslope, slightly increase
pressure on the forward pedal, pull slightly more with your right hand, or
turn the wheel slightly more.

---As you master slight inclines, learn to do track stands on level ground,
steeper inclines, and declines.

Congratulations! You have mastered this skill when you can consistently
track stand for one minute.
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Old 04-19-06, 12:36 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by iamtim
Here's an oddity -- I can trackstand better on my roadie than I can my fixie. Go figure. I use the freewheel to keep my feet in the "perfect" position, and I use the brakes to help control rolling. I get neither of those on the fixie (well, save a front brake, but I use a cyclocross lever so it's in a different position).
Me too! I thought I was the only one. I've been riding a fixed gear for a couple of months now, and I still can't do it very well on the fixie. I just can't get the rocking thing down.
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Old 04-19-06, 01:03 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by The Fixer
No need to analyze this from a practical point of view. Simply put, it's the cool factor....
Although the cool factor is significantly diminished when you “bail” in a crowded intersection.
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Old 04-19-06, 01:07 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by caloso
Me too! I thought I was the only one. I've been riding a fixed gear for a couple of months now, and I still can't do it very well on the fixie. I just can't get the rocking thing down.
The mellower your gear on a fixed bike, the easier it is. Under 70 gear inches is great.
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Old 04-19-06, 02:18 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by marqueemoon
Under 70 gear inches is great.
I'm running 42x16, which I think is in the mid- to upper-60s. But I could be wrong.
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Old 04-19-06, 04:32 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by KevinF
What is the practical purpose of doing a trackstand on the road anyway? From reading the replies in this thread, several of you can only do one for 20 or 30 seconds, which is barely enough time for the light to change anyway. I see the occassional rider doing them, but it always looks like they're spending a lot of energy trying to stand still. Is it really that hard to get clipped back in? If you're actually racing on a velodrome, I can see the point -- but on the road? Why?
I can almost always wait out the light trackstanding, and its nuch better than constantly clipping in and out. Its much easier to get going again after the light, and I'd like to think it impresses people. But its also fun!

It doesn't take much energy to do, just technique and concentration, and remember that lights are often red when you get to them so its not like you always have to wait out the full cycle.
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