Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Ti bike for large rider (6/4 vs. 3/2.5)

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Ti bike for large rider (6/4 vs. 3/2.5)

Old 07-19-06, 05:04 PM
  #1  
IcemanYQQ
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 51

Bikes: Bianchi, Colnago

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Ti bike for large rider (6/4 vs. 3/2.5)

I have worn out my Colngao Master, over 30,000kms, and a some rust has helped to finish the job. I am 6'2", and about 200lbs. I am a strong rider, Cat. 3, seldom race, enjoy hill climbs (self-punishment), long rides 100 miles, and maybe a time trial once or twice a year.

Is there any real difference between the two grades of Titanium. I am looking at the Vortex vs. Tuscany, and the Merlin 6.4 vs. 3-2.5. Price is not an issue, although I won't spend the extra if I don't need too, I will if a non-pro will notice a big difference in the two rides, if not, there is no sense in wasting money.
IcemanYQQ is offline  
Old 07-19-06, 05:10 PM
  #2  
brianallan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: depends on weather
Posts: 1,513
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
how is it worn out, and is it for sale!
brianallan is offline  
Old 07-19-06, 05:11 PM
  #3  
brianallan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: depends on weather
Posts: 1,513
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
and I have heard ti is a bad material for heavy riders. it has more flex than steel and so when you put a big fellow on it like yourself it might feel kind of squishy : )
brianallan is offline  
Old 07-19-06, 05:22 PM
  #4  
IcemanYQQ
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 51

Bikes: Bianchi, Colnago

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by brianallan
how is it worn out, and is it for sale!
No, it is not for sale. It's eight years old, and seen better days
IcemanYQQ is offline  
Old 07-19-06, 05:23 PM
  #5  
IcemanYQQ
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 51

Bikes: Bianchi, Colnago

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by brianallan
and I have heard ti is a bad material for heavy riders. it has more flex than steel and so when you put a big fellow on it like yourself it might feel kind of squishy : )
Thanks, that is one of the things I have heard, but I have also read that in recent years, manufacturers have dealt with that problem. I'm wondering if one is noticeably stiffer than the other.
IcemanYQQ is offline  
Old 07-19-06, 08:39 PM
  #6  
RiPHRaPH
Don't Believe the Hype
 
RiPHRaPH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: chicagoland area
Posts: 2,668

Bikes: 1999 Steelman SR525, 2002 Lightspeed Ultimate, 1988 Trek 830, 2008 Scott Addict

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I ride a Lightspeed Ultimate, which is 6/4 in the bottom bracket area and 3/2.5 in all other places.
I can definitely tell a difference between the 6/4 in the bottom bracket area and the relative flex of 3/2 in the Lightspeed Classic. I really felt the difference when trying both models with comparable wheels, tires, psi, seatpost, etc.
I am 185lbs and have seen and heard the same thing from others.
(i am cat5)
RiPHRaPH is offline  
Old 07-19-06, 09:36 PM
  #7  
iansir
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 474

Bikes: Giant TCR2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
In terms of stiffness, 6/4 is 7-8% more stiff than 3/2.5. That's not even noticeable. However, 6/4 is quite a bit stronger (maybe 20%) which allows for the frame to be designed differently to take this into account, providing a more stiff ride. So it won't necessarily come down to which material will work best for a larger rider, but more to which frameset will work best. The only way to tell is with some test rides.
iansir is offline  
Old 07-19-06, 09:55 PM
  #8  
Paulus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Christchurch, NZ
Posts: 80
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by RiPHRaPH
I ride a Lightspeed Ultimate, which is 6/4 in the bottom bracket area and 3/2.5 in all other places.
I can definitely tell a difference between the 6/4 in the bottom bracket area and the relative flex of 3/2 in the Lightspeed Classic. I really felt the difference when trying both models with comparable wheels, tires, psi, seatpost, etc.
I am 185lbs and have seen and heard the same thing from others.
(i am cat5)
The new Tuscany is much beefier than the Classic though. The tubes look like oversized Aluminium as far as size goes whereas the ones on the classic look more like old school steel. I wouldn't have thought flex would be an issue.
Paulus is offline  
Old 07-19-06, 10:02 PM
  #9  
H1449-6
Former grouch, now happy
 
H1449-6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Austin
Posts: 988
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by brianallan
and I have heard ti is a bad material for heavy riders. it has more flex than steel and so when you put a big fellow on it like yourself it might feel kind of squishy : )
Any material (with the possible exception of bamboo) can be made into a stiff or compliant frame.

Example:

Aluminum: stiff (Klein and Cannondale); compliant/whippy: Vitus, old Alan

Stiffness is largely a function of tubing diameter and shape. Most newer Ti frames, particularly in the larger sizes, have an oversized down tube, which is one of the key design elements that will lend greater stiffness.
__________________
Spectrum Ti Super | Landshark Roadshark | Serotta Colorado | Gunnar Crosshairs | Trek 9800 | Santana fillet brazed tandem | K2 Easy Roller | Dawes (BD) Bullseye 1x1
H1449-6 is offline  
Old 07-19-06, 10:19 PM
  #10  
Thylacine
Industry Maven
 
Thylacine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Wherever good bikes are sold
Posts: 2,936

Bikes: Thylacines...only Thylacines.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I think I'm qualified to respond to this one.

There is no right or wrong material for your height, weight or abilities. It's how the bike is designed to take into account these factors. You don't ride a tube, you ride a frame, so a frame of either material will be fine if it's designed right.

I'm completely biased of course, but I don't understand why you'd want to spend such a huge chunk of change on an off-the-shelf bike, when for the same price you can get custom. The problem is exacerbated when it comes to us big guys too (I'm 6ft 3ins, 205lbs) - most off the shelf bikes in our size have atrocious geometry that is far from optimal. I know this because it was one of the contibuting factors of me starting this business!

What is your budget for the frame and forks or complete bike? You mention you only race every once and a while, so is this going to be your only bike?
Thylacine is offline  
Old 07-20-06, 06:54 AM
  #11  
H1449-6
Former grouch, now happy
 
H1449-6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Austin
Posts: 988
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Thylacine
[Commercial post]
I don't see a red star next to your name. Is it possible that you have posted 2,600 plus mostly commercial messages on this board, and have a link to your company in your signature, all without paying a measly $25?

I can't imagine this; you must have paid some tribute to Joe.
__________________
Spectrum Ti Super | Landshark Roadshark | Serotta Colorado | Gunnar Crosshairs | Trek 9800 | Santana fillet brazed tandem | K2 Easy Roller | Dawes (BD) Bullseye 1x1
H1449-6 is offline  
Old 07-20-06, 07:02 AM
  #12  
pelotonracer
Up and comer
 
pelotonracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Check out the Douglas frames from Colorado Cyclist (www.coloradocyclist.com). They have 3/2.5 & 6/4 frames that are virtually identical to the Litespeeds, made in the USA, & are about half the price.

As for the difference, I'd say go for 6/4 if you can afford it. If you get a 3/2.5, you'll spend a long time thinking, "maybe I should have gotten the stiffer, better one..."
pelotonracer is offline  
Old 07-20-06, 08:19 AM
  #13  
IcemanYQQ
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 51

Bikes: Bianchi, Colnago

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Thylacine
I think I'm qualified to respond to this one.

I'm completely biased of course, but I don't understand why you'd want to spend such a huge chunk of change on an off-the-shelf bike, when for the same price you can get custom. The problem is exacerbated when it comes to us big guys too (I'm 6ft 3ins, 205lbs) - most off the shelf bikes in our size have atrocious geometry that is far from optimal. I know this because it was one of the contibuting factors of me starting this business!

What is your budget for the frame and forks or complete bike? You mention you only race every once and a while, so is this going to be your only bike?
As stated in my earlier post, I ride a Colnago Master X~Lite. I never said I was getting a stock bike, I am getting custom fit for either the Merlin or the Litespeed, it only costs an extra $500, money I think that will be well spent. The new 3/2.5 Tuscany has very oversize tubes with aggressively shaped tubing. I think that will help in the stiffness department. I will go and ride both next week, I have to drive 5 hours to the closest Litespeed dealer.

Budget is not an issue, and this is not my only bike, I have a cyclecross bike that doubles as a trainer and touring bike. I have a Cat. 3 licence, I just don't like racing crits and circuit races. I have all the components, I currently have Record 9sp Carbon. The only new purchases will be the new Carbon Cranks, BB, Headset, Seatpost, and Front Derailer, all stuff that wont transfer due to the differences in the bikes.

If I don't like the ride of the Ti bikes, then I will probably just get a C50, or President, but I have always wanted a Ti bike.
IcemanYQQ is offline  
Old 07-20-06, 08:28 AM
  #14  
IcemanYQQ
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 51

Bikes: Bianchi, Colnago

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by pelotonracer
Check out the Douglas frames from Colorado Cyclist (www.coloradocyclist.com). They have 3/2.5 & 6/4 frames that are virtually identical to the Litespeeds, made in the USA, & are about half the price.
Thanks, I have looked at those, but I don't live in the USA, and only want to buy a bike that I can get in Canada.
IcemanYQQ is offline  
Old 07-20-06, 01:19 PM
  #15  
Blastinbob
Mufflerman
 
Blastinbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 387
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Talk to Tom Kellog at Spectrum cycles http://www.spectrum-cycles.com/ He will design the bike for you and Merlin will build it. Give him a call he's a super guy and won't steer you wrong.
Blastinbob is offline  
Old 07-20-06, 01:49 PM
  #16  
Stickney
Longing for a Tail Wind
 
Stickney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: I wish I were in South Dakota
Posts: 446
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I am 6'3" and 250 and ride and '05 Litespeed Tuscany. One of the reasons I chose it was a discussion from this website (See link) about the relative merits of 3/2.5 vs 6/4 titanium: http://www.bikesportmichigan.com/rev...uscany03.shtml

I think the technology might be there for extruding 6/4 titanium now though, I don't know. Do I think my bike is flexy? Maybe, but it sure is comfy. I previously owned an aluminum TREK, so I was looking for more compliance.
Stickney is offline  
Old 07-20-06, 01:56 PM
  #17  
yakes_md
Hopped up on goofballs
 
yakes_md's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Severna Park, MD
Posts: 107
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Blastinbob
Talk to Tom Kellog at Spectrum cycles http://www.spectrum-cycles.com/ He will design the bike for you and Merlin will build it. Give him a call he's a super guy and won't steer you wrong.
Speaking of Spectrum, here's a link to an article discussing the relative merits of 6/2 vs, 3/2.5

http://www.spectrum-cycles.com/624.htm

FWIW - I am 6'2", 200lbs and ride a 2004 Litespeed Teramo (3/2.5). I don't race, but I do have to chase my faster buddies from time to time. I haven't noticed much flex in the frame.
yakes_md is offline  
Old 07-20-06, 03:06 PM
  #18  
iansir
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 474

Bikes: Giant TCR2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I believe Tom Kellogg has noted that what he wrote there is kind of old news now...there have been improvements, such as seamless 6/4 tubing. I mean, he is pushing 6/4 frames a lot now...take a look at the new Merlin Works line.
iansir is offline  
Old 07-20-06, 03:28 PM
  #19  
darkmother
Get the stick.
 
darkmother's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Toronto, ON
Posts: 1,543

Bikes: 12 Y.O. Litespeed MTB, IRO Jamie Roy fixie, Custom Habanero Ti 'Cross, No name SS MTB, Old school lugged steel track bike (soon)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by IcemanYQQ
I have worn out my Colngao Master, over 30,000kms, and a some rust has helped to finish the job. I am 6'2", and about 200lbs. I am a strong rider, Cat. 3, seldom race, enjoy hill climbs (self-punishment), long rides 100 miles, and maybe a time trial once or twice a year.

Is there any real difference between the two grades of Titanium. I am looking at the Vortex vs. Tuscany, and the Merlin 6.4 vs. 3-2.5. Price is not an issue, although I won't spend the extra if I don't need too, I will if a non-pro will notice a big difference in the two rides, if not, there is no sense in wasting money.
Ok, I'll throw in my $0.02 here. I am almost exactly your size, and ride 3/2.5 Ti frame. I also really mash, and like to climb out of the saddle pushing bigger gears. My frame-a custom Habanero cross, is the stiffest of all of my road bikes in the bottom bracket-and is also the stiffest road frame I have ever ridden.

The idea that Ti bikes are flexy is a reputation that has it's roots in the first generation Ti frames. The first Ti bikes, like really old Merlins, were made of aircraft hydraulic Ti tube, which I assume was available in small diameters with relatively thick walls. If you've seen one of those old bikes, they are very similar to steel frames in terms of tube diameter used-like ~1" diameter main tubes . As a result, they were roughly 1/2 half the stiffness of a comparable steel frame. Thus the reputation.

Current Ti frames use tube diameters that much larger, and as a result can be very stiff. My frame uses larger diameter tubes than many aluminum bikes. Keep in mind that for geometrically similar parts, ie the same physical size and shape steel is stiffer than Ti which is stiffer than aluminum. Thus, a 4 lb Ti frame, using the same tube diameters, will be stiffer than a 4 lb aluminum frame.

I'd say don't worry too much about the alloy used. Test ride the bikes. Also remember that lots of things besides the frame can make a bike feel stiff or flexable....like wheels, bar and stem.
darkmother is offline  
Old 07-20-06, 06:34 PM
  #20  
IcemanYQQ
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 51

Bikes: Bianchi, Colnago

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for all the comments. I can't wait to ride one on Monday and make a decision.
IcemanYQQ is offline  
Old 07-20-06, 06:39 PM
  #21  
patentcad
Peloton Shelter Dog
 
patentcad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Chester, NY
Posts: 90,401

Bikes: 2017 Scott Foil, 2016 Scott Addict SL, 2018 Santa Cruz Blur CC MTB

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I ride a Cannondale Six13 for more competitive rides and an Ibis Titanium Road (3/2.5 butted Ti) the other half of the time, particularly for longer rides. But I weigh 165lbs. If I were 200lbs I'd seriously lean to the CF/Six13 type of bicycle - simply because I'd be a bit skittish about Ti being too mushy. That may be one reason you don't see much Ti in the pro peloton. Floyd Landis reportedly generates TWELVE HUNDRED WATTS in a sprint. I would guess a Merlin might feel like a wet noddle under that much wattage. And the bigger/heavier you are, the more crucial this factor becomes.

I'm only throwing this out there because you're a strong rider - a Cat 3 racer who's 200lbs - and it's a significant point to consider. I also realize that there's nothing quite as nice as a Ti bicycle - but in my opinion the comfort/responsiveness does come at a price in performance terms. I can feel it in my riding (I get to 'A-B' these bikes on a daily basis). Particularly on hills/sprints. But I often PREFER the feel of the Ibis Ti, especially on rougher roads/longer rides. Love the Cdale, but nothing is quite like Ti.

Bottom line is that the Ibis Ti Road gives up SOME performance to the Cannondale (or insert name of favorite CF racing bike HERE _____) - but I'd say it's that 5% edge. But every now and then that 5% is VERY nice to have on your side, all that 'it's all in the motor, why don't YOU Lose 5 lbs off your butt' stuff aside. Um... I already DID lose the 5lbs, and I've been working on my motor for a long time now.
patentcad is offline  
Old 07-23-06, 10:52 PM
  #22  
Thylacine
Industry Maven
 
Thylacine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Wherever good bikes are sold
Posts: 2,936

Bikes: Thylacines...only Thylacines.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by H1449-6
I don't see a red star next to your name. Is it possible that you have posted 2,600 plus mostly commercial messages on this board, and have a link to your company in your signature, all without paying a measly $25?
No, it's actually not possible. Most of my posts are total drivel on The Aussie Thread, but thanks for the personal interest.

However, if someone has a question about material or ride qualities or whatever, I like to contribute - especially considering I'm 34, the same height and weight as the OP, AND I've been riding roadbikes all my life. The fact that I'm in a good position to contibute is just a bonus as far as I'm concerned. It's like you get the benefit of consulting a pro consultant, minus the bill. Everybody wins.

Don't like what I have to say? Simple - don't read it.
Thylacine is offline  
Old 07-23-06, 11:22 PM
  #23  
ViperZ
Baby it's cold outside...
 
ViperZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: SK, Canada
Posts: 7,307

Bikes: Trek 5000, Rocky Mountain Wedge, GT Karakoram K2, Litespeed Tuscany

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm 5'11 & 200 Lbs. I ride a 2003 Tuscany (3/2.5) and it is stiff enough for me and my big pipes... As others have said here, frame design is more important than actual material in this case.

The Tuscany is a fine machine, and you will not be dissapointed
__________________
-Trek 5000* -Project Litespeed* -The Italian Job* -Rocky Wedge* -The Canadian Connection*
ViperZ is offline  
Old 07-23-06, 11:47 PM
  #24  
CycleFreakLS
Senior Member
 
CycleFreakLS's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Southern CA
Posts: 663

Bikes: Litespeed, Medici, Gary Fisher

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by patentcad
...skittish about Ti being too mushy. That may be one reason you don't see much Ti in the pro peloton.
Ti is not mushy. I don't think there's anybody who'd say the Vortex ride is mushy. Also, Ti not in the pros ... main driven by economics. To supply a team with frames means the framebuilder needs to supply 20+ riders with 3+ frames each plus at least one TT frame. That's a huge dollar investment.

For the orig poster, there are plenty of frames from Litespeed, Merlin, Seven, Serotta, Hab., etc. that will probably fit the bill ... or several, several BILLs (as in Ben Franklin that is).
CycleFreakLS is offline  
Old 07-24-06, 12:09 AM
  #25  
ViperZ
Baby it's cold outside...
 
ViperZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: SK, Canada
Posts: 7,307

Bikes: Trek 5000, Rocky Mountain Wedge, GT Karakoram K2, Litespeed Tuscany

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by patentcad
I ride a Cannondale Six13 for more competitive rides and an Ibis Titanium Road (3/2.5 butted Ti) the other half of the time, particularly for longer rides. But I weigh 165lbs. If I were 200lbs I'd seriously lean to the CF/Six13 type of bicycle - simply because I'd be a bit skittish about Ti being too mushy. That may be one reason you don't see much Ti in the pro peloton. Floyd Landis reportedly generates TWELVE HUNDRED WATTS in a sprint. I would guess a Merlin might feel like a wet noddle under that much wattage. And the bigger/heavier you are, the more crucial this factor becomes.

I'm only throwing this out there because you're a strong rider - a Cat 3 racer who's 200lbs - and it's a significant point to consider. I also realize that there's nothing quite as nice as a Ti bicycle - but in my opinion the comfort/responsiveness does come at a price in performance terms. I can feel it in my riding (I get to 'A-B' these bikes on a daily basis). Particularly on hills/sprints. But I often PREFER the feel of the Ibis Ti, especially on rougher roads/longer rides. Love the Cdale, but nothing is quite like Ti.

Bottom line is that the Ibis Ti Road gives up SOME performance to the Cannondale (or insert name of favorite CF racing bike HERE _____) - but I'd say it's that 5% edge. But every now and then that 5% is VERY nice to have on your side, all that 'it's all in the motor, why don't YOU Lose 5 lbs off your butt' stuff aside. Um... I already DID lose the 5lbs, and I've been working on my motor for a long time now.

Titanium didn't seem to bother Robbie McEwan, a very strong sprinter...

In 2002 he rode a Litespeed and won:

2 stages of Paris Nice
2 stages in the Giro d'Italia
2 stages of the Tour de France
Green jersey in the Tour de France
__________________
-Trek 5000* -Project Litespeed* -The Italian Job* -Rocky Wedge* -The Canadian Connection*

Last edited by ViperZ; 07-24-06 at 04:52 AM.
ViperZ is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.