Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

First long ride...was very very hard

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

First long ride...was very very hard

Old 08-05-06, 07:24 PM
  #1  
yummypasta
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 34
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
First long ride...was very very hard

Having started biking two months ago, I do a 20mi round-trip commute mostly every day. I decided that I should try for a longer ride on the weekend. Previously, I "tried" this but I didn't do more than 15mi or so. This time, I planned a route to take that was about 50 miles, not thinking it would be too bad.

Long story short, I got horrendously lost and I ended up doing a 60mi loop. There were hills and a lot of them, but then again, my idea of big hills might be quite small. It took me 4:40 on bike and about 5:30 total including breaks outside gas stations staring at everyone. I drank more than I thought possible. I'm also quite tired.

One thing to note is that I didn't use my drops too much (due to Sora thumb shift), but my shoulders, wrist, and especially neck, hurt. I've read around here that weight training in those areas (back/shoulders) to build strength will help? The neck was pretty painful at the end of the ride since I had to bend it up to look ahead...or was I supposed to look at my front wheel the whole time? How do I get rid of that pain? Luckily my saddle is a good fit, with not much butt pain now.

I think I'm going to sleep a lot tonight. Goodnight and thanks for listening.
yummypasta is offline  
Old 08-05-06, 09:57 PM
  #2  
Sooner Rider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Oklahoma City
Posts: 353
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Sounds like everyone else's early long rides. Weight training will help all areas, especially neck, shoulders and upper back where you were probably tensing up today. Keep putting in the miles & working out, loosen up before you ride, warm up the first 10-15 minutes, remain conscious of relaxing, change hand positions when possible, stay in the drops when riding fast (downhill & into the wind), and find groups to ride with. And although your butt may not hurt tonight, tomorrow's another day!
Sooner Rider is offline  
Old 08-05-06, 10:15 PM
  #3  
furiousferret 
Senior Member
 
furiousferret's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Redlands, CA
Posts: 5,777
Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 609 Post(s)
Liked 26 Times in 15 Posts
Just keep riding. It'll get better alot sooner than you think.
furiousferret is offline  
Old 08-05-06, 10:26 PM
  #4  
twahl
Tom (ex)Builder
 
twahl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Manassas, VA
Posts: 2,814

Bikes: Specialized Allez

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
It'll come. Do you have a visor on your helmet? If so, remove it for a couple of rides and see how you feel. I found that after removing mine, my neck felt much better.
__________________
Tom

"It hurts so good..."
twahl is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 05:44 AM
  #5  
msheron
I-M-D bell curve of bikn'
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: NC mountains
Posts: 2,926

Bikes: 06' Jamis Eclipse in the making.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The only way to break through the distance barrier is well, ride distance. The body gets accustomed to your routine rides and when you throw a curve ball at your legs and lungs, well your body reacts with a bonked state.

Try doing interval training as well through the week of maybe once or twice since you ride often.

My first metric century kicked my a$$ but my second one was much easier. I just finished a ride yesterday in preparation for the Hilly Hellacious by doing a climb to Mount Pisgah. Basically a 16 mile climb to the top with a few flats and I mean a few. It took us a total time of 2 hrs. 21 mins. to go to the top and back for 32 miles. It was very foggy at that elevation and the wind was blowing and became cold almost from it blowing on my sweaty torso.

Even saw a few copperhead snakes on the road as I went up! Damn snakes, they make my skin crawl!
__________________
Ego Campana Inflectum of Circuitous
msheron is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 06:34 AM
  #6  
Ray Dockrey
Senior Member
 
Ray Dockrey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Mustang, OK
Posts: 728
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by twahl
It'll come. Do you have a visor on your helmet? If so, remove it for a couple of rides and see how you feel. I found that after removing mine, my neck felt much better.
I had to do this to. With the visor sticking down you have to raise your head up further. When I bought my new helmet recently I just bought a road helmet that had no visor.
Ray Dockrey is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 06:37 AM
  #7  
chainsaw936
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
[QUOTE=yummypasta]Long story short, I got horrendously lost and I ended up doing a 60mi loop. There were hills and a lot of them, but then again, my idea of big hills might be quite small. It took me 4:40 on bike and about 5:30 total including breaks outside gas stations staring at everyone. I drank more than I thought possible. I'm also quite tired.

This sounds exactly like my first long ride yesterday. I've been riding consistently for about 1 1/2 months and have only done 10, 15, and one 30mile run on Mondays for the last 3 weeks (average about 150 miles per week). The 30 mile about did me in the first time but has gotten easier. Yesterday, the 66 mile route went something like this; first 18miles was a breeze averaging 18mph with very little leg fatigue. The second stage was 20 and still kept the average around 18mph. After resting at the second stage, I did a light stretch and headed back out. My legs felt like lead and I couldn't hardly maintain 15mph! I took a gel pack and drank some accelerade but it didn't bring my legs back. I did finish the ride but today I have soreness like never before.

It made me realize the benefit of getting on a program with intervals and longer rides cycled in. I've got another 60 plus in two weeks and will be training to hang mid-pack. The experienced riders I've talked with encourage me to keep at it and it will come. Good luck with the training and keep grinding the pedals.
chainsaw936 is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 06:52 AM
  #8  
iNewton
Senior Member
 
iNewton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Baie-Comeau, Québec
Posts: 600

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix Comp '06

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What doesn't kill you makes you stronger. You still achieved this and it's a feat on it's own, sore or not. You can be proud. The state you are left in will only get better if you keep at it and make more long distance rides.

Cheers and congrats.
iNewton is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 07:01 AM
  #9  
lennyk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 483
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
well at least when you do the correct short route it will be easier
lennyk is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 07:23 AM
  #10  
twbradford
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
It would be helpful to know more: type of bike, your weight, age...etc. Based on what you say it sounds like you are somewhat fit. 20 miles commute is a good start but it is ain't a full 50. What you are basically saying is that you increased your distance by 400% or 5x your normal distance. Your commute is really 10 miles each way. There is enough of a break between your riding each way to work that they are only 10 mile rides each day. Your body doesn't really get to warm up by the time you get to work. It takes me about 20 miles before my body is ready to hammer it and do some serious effort.

You need to develop the entire package, muscles, aerobic engine...etc. Weight training may help with strength but it doesn't do anything for your aerobic engine and that is what is needed on climbs. If you look at the good climbers they are skinny and lean....but their heart and lungs are in top form. My wife and I supplemented our riding with weekly gym sessions 2x per week. We did an hour of aggressive cardio \aerobic excercises (bike, elliptical....etc)....but the idea was to get the heart rate up to the 80% range.

Also try doing group rides...the charity type. You will find you can go further than you think because of the group dynamics and the support they provide. I mentioned your bike because if you are riding with panniers or wide tires you are going to expend more effort than a low end race capable bike like a Trek 1000 or Specialized Allez. If you are serious about distance riding then consider a professional bike fit. My wife did it and her performance improved...along with riding with road shoes.

Be patient, keep improving, keep on keeping on....it will be worth it.

oh....and head over to trainright.com and get on their newsletter as well as subscribe to the free RBR newsletter: www.roadbikerider.com/newsletter.htm. They have great tips and suggestions.
twbradford is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 07:48 AM
  #11  
eyefloater
Me talk pretty one day.
 
eyefloater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,073
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by twbradford
Also try doing group rides...the charity type. You will find you can go further than you think because of the group dynamics and the support they provide.
Definitely.

I just finished doing a big charity ride - The Friends for Life Bike Rally. That was 250 riders who went from Toronto to Montreal (660k) to raise money for the Toronto People with AIDS Foundation. The riders ranged from people in their early 20s, straight through the 30s, 40s and 50s. The oldest cyclist was I believe a 65 year-old grandmother. Obviously a lot of these people aren't what you'd normally call "cycling enthusiasts." I work at a bike shop that provided mechanical support for the ride and we saw a lot of people coming in for tune-ups before the ride started. Many of them hadn't touched their bike since they did the rally last year. So these people - men and women of all fitness levels and ages - literally don't touch a bike all year, concentrate on the weekly training rides in the 2 months leading up to the rally (rides that scale up from 30k-120k as the weeks progress) and end up hopping on a bike and averaging 110k for a week straight. The group dynamics/support aspect is a huge factor in people accomplishing this. Another huge factor is "The Cause." Whatever it may be, when you're riding for something bigger than yourself you'll be motivated and constantly encouraged to either perform better or just go on.

During the rally, most of us mechanics rode each day (A: it was fun, B: someone was around to do quick on-the-road fixes). I saw a complete atmosphere of people encouraging each other and supporting one another (stop to fix a flat and you'll likely have a dozen people make sure you've got all your tools, etc. before they go on, people ask about your hydration/nutrition for the day like they'd ask what's new). Honestly, I couldn't imagine a more supportive environment for people who are determined to accomplish a big goal at cycling but may be hesitant about their physical strength/endurance.

So ya, do a charity ride. The bigger, the better (do group training rides ... you'll get to know people before the ride and end up spending your time with a bunch of friends who are looking out for you). Whatever your goals are, I'm sure you'll accomplish them. Plus, it's not just you that benefits from all the effort which is a great bonus after all your hard work.

- Mike
eyefloater is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 08:01 AM
  #12  
Grasschopper
He drop me
 
Grasschopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Central PA
Posts: 11,647

Bikes: '03 Marin Mill Valley, '02 Eddy Merckx Corsa 0.1, '12 Giant Defy Advance, '13 Salsa Vaya

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 123 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You should easy into ride length a bit more slowly that tripling your longest ride to date. I believe the number that is tossed around is like 10%-20% so of you were doing 20 miles rides go to say 25 (a bit outside my numbers but...) then maybe 30...then MAYBE just to 40 then to 50. Your muscles just weren't used to the stress you put on them and it could also point to a poor fitting bike (bars too low).

Adding distance is for sure easier in a group.
__________________
The views expressed by this poster do not reflect the views of BikeForums.net.
Grasschopper is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 08:20 AM
  #13  
yummypasta
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 34
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for all the advice!

When you say visor...you mean that black thing that extends in front of the helmet? For some reason when I read people talking about visors before, I always assumed it was something simulating sunglasses that extended down from the helmet. Heh. I'll try removing it.

twbradford: I'm riding a Raleigh Sport 2006, low end road bike which looks pretty. Weight: ~145 Age: 18

Group rides sound like fun, but I don't have many friends who ride that much, and finding cycling clubs seems hard...I'm leaving for college in less than a month so introducing myself to local clubs is kinda pointless. I'm hoping to join a cycling club there and see what happens.

I hope to ride another 50mi next weekend and keep doing that if I can. It was pretty fun. Hopefully it'll be easier so I can boost the distance up to a century sometime soon.

O. And my butt is fine the day after (today) :-D
yummypasta is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 08:30 AM
  #14  
CarreraGT612hp
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 138
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
awesome, but i think you need to ride more. are u italian? or do u just like italian food?
CarreraGT612hp is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 08:30 AM
  #15  
oldwheels
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
First Long Ride.....

Yesterday wasn't my first....it was my second, and I definitely feel some of the same symptoms. I got on a bike for the first time in lots of years on June 15th and yesterday rode 208 KMs - thank God I live in Florida, so the biggest hill was the bridge over Sebastian Inlet. Last Saturday I did 70 miles and felt much better than I expected or deserved to, so I went for it yesterday. I struggled with wrist pain during the ride and also felt a stiff neck near the end, but otherwise felt pretty good. No, I'm not able to maintain a decent speed yet, but that will come. It would damn sure take more than a testosterone patch for me to have a good ride today! The best thing of all is being 59 and now getting younger!
oldwheels is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 08:33 AM
  #16  
yummypasta
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 34
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hahahahaha. No I'm not italian. I just like italian food and happened to be eating it when I signed up here
yummypasta is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 08:58 AM
  #17  
Hipcycler
OCP
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: MILWAUKEE
Posts: 6,289

Bikes: The kind with two wheels

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The fact that you are ready to try it again says you'll be fine.

These things just take time, and repetition. There is no magic bullet....no special weight room work needed.

If it's something you want to do, then you have to get your body used to doing it by...well...doing it.

It sounds simple, but it's the real deal.
Each time you do 50 miles, your neck will be a little less sore, and soon you'll want to do 60, 75, then a century.
Hipcycler is offline  
Old 08-06-06, 09:11 AM
  #18  
blonduathlongrl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,927
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
good for you! just keep doing it and it will either get easier or your behind will shape into the shape of your seat and make it way easier
blonduathlongrl is offline  
Old 08-07-06, 12:13 AM
  #19  
twbradford
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Good that you are so young...and you are looking for advice.
Hit up those websites for training tips.
At your age a heavier bike is good so that you will develop more strength.
Just ease into the miles. Don't do too much too soon....or you will hate it.
There are charity rides all over ......just do a google for groups in whatever state you reside.

good luck!
twbradford is offline  
Old 08-07-06, 05:35 AM
  #20  
lrzipris
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Philadelphia suburb
Posts: 911
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by yummypasta
...my shoulders, wrist, and especially neck, hurt. I've read around here that weight training in those areas (back/shoulders) to build strength will help? The neck was pretty painful at the end of the ride since I had to bend it up to look ahead...
Remember to stay loose on the bike. That is, the tension you describe may have come from riding with your arms too stiff and locked. When I first began riding serioiusly, I would find myself too stiff and make a conscious effort to flex and bend my elbows. Change your hand position often. Take an occasional stretch during a ride, moving one arm at a time, moving your neck around, standing for a moment (even if you're not climbing or otherwise have to stand), etc. If you don't find the Sora thumb shifter convenient to reach from the drops, get in the drops when you won't have to shift much--long, straight sections of road--you'll be amazed at how much benefit comes from being aerodynamic.
lrzipris is offline  
Old 08-07-06, 06:14 AM
  #21  
FrankBattle 
SilentRider
 
FrankBattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 2,380

Bikes: Giant TCR 2 Composite, Pedal Force RS (Dura-Ace), Pedal Force CG1 (SRAM Force), Badger Cycles custom steel road, Pedal Force RS2 (SRAM Red)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Good for you! Ride enough and you'll find out what works for you. I second the advice to stay loose. It's often overlooked, but is really beneficial on longer rides. When you are stiff, all road vibrations hit your muscles and joints that much harder. You tire quicker ..

Enjoy your rides!
FrankBattle is offline  
Old 08-07-06, 09:04 AM
  #22  
johnnygofaster
Senior Member
 
johnnygofaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Kent, OH
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I did my first 60+ recently as well. It was semi-accidental. The weather was great and before I knew it I was 30 miles from home.

Unlike you, I stopped for lunch and turned back. I averaged 16.5 over 62 miles on flat terrain with maybe 6-8 hills of 40-60 feet or less. I'm 32 and ride a road bike.

Anyway, I was sore as he!!, especially in the neck and shoulders. And I've weight-trained for 10+ years along with swimming regularly. I feel your pain.

My conclusion was I need cycling glasses so I can look out "through" my eyebrows without my contacts getting bugs stuck to them.
johnnygofaster is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.