Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Road bike with sand on the floor

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Road bike with sand on the floor

Old 04-23-03, 08:28 PM
  #1  
Cadd
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 1,452
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Road bike with sand on the floor

I was riding along this road that had very very very small patches of sand on it. The sand is no more than 1/8 of an inch thick.

Each time I ride across it, I felt like I was going to fall. I didn't have control of the bike. Is this common?

What do you do in situations like these (except to avoid the sand)?

Note: I have 700x25 tires (Michelin Axial Pro to be exact)
Cadd is offline  
Old 04-23-03, 08:39 PM
  #2  
roadbuzz
Just ride.
 
roadbuzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: C-ville, Va
Posts: 3,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Never had to deal with sand, but "puddles" of gravel are a similar problem. If I can't avoid them, I try to hold my line and utilize momentum to take me through. It's definitely a bad idea to try to adjust once you've hit them.
roadbuzz is offline  
Old 04-23-03, 09:41 PM
  #3  
1oldRoadie
Oh God, He's back!
 
1oldRoadie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 1,021

Bikes: Paramount

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
sand on corners scare the hell out of me!!
__________________
I can't ride and Frown!
1oldRoadie is offline  
Old 04-24-03, 01:33 AM
  #4  
Dutchy
We drive on the left.
 
Dutchy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Posts: 1,096
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You answered your own question, avoid the sand. Road bikes are very dicey around any surface that isn't solid. That's what make the Paris-Roubaix so special.

CHEERS.

Mark
Dutchy is offline  
Old 04-24-03, 05:36 AM
  #5  
georgesnatcher
newbie newbie
 
georgesnatcher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Happy to be in FLORIDA
Posts: 633

Bikes: Titanium Indy Fab 29" mtb

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If you have to go through sand stay off of the brakes and steering. Either one will put you down in a heartbeat.
georgesnatcher is offline  
Old 04-24-03, 07:01 AM
  #6  
TandemGeek
hors category
 
TandemGeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 7,230
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally posted by Cadd
[B]Each time I ride across it, I felt like I was going to fall. I didn't have control of the bike. Is this common?[B]
Yes, this is very common with sand, silt and ice -- And no, you can't turn or brake while you're in it. If sand or silt is of any measureable depth your front tire will "snow plow" the material which will cause an immediate slowing effect on your bike and can wrench the handlebars in your hands. The deeper the sand or silt the more dramatic this effect. Therefore, if you're riding with a group allow more spacing between your bikes to prevent tire bumping by the following riders -- see below regarding "anticipation".

Originally posted by Cadd
What do you do in situations like these (except to avoid the sand)?
Anticipate it. If you're riding in unfamiliar territory be very cautious in areas or when conditions would likely create this types of hazards:

a). If you're riding in mountains with switchbacks shortly after a heavy rain expect to encounter sand or silt that may have washed out into the apex of turns.
b). If you're a cold weather rider be cautious on shady roads and overpasses when ever you see a discoloration in the road surface -- a damp road and black ice look the same.
c). If you are riding through on-going or recently completed construction zones anticipate sand and silt.
d). In urban areas recognize that sand, silt and grit will collect where cars don't sweep the road such as close to the shoulders of the road (one of the reasons riding to the right of the fog line can be less than desireable).
e). If you're riding along coastal highways or in areas where sand is prevailent (Florida, coastal areas & the US Southwest) expect to encounter sand that has blown onto the road and then been pushed towards the fog line and shoulders by passing traffic.

On your local routes, just be mindful of new construction or construction vehicle traffic.

Once you realize you're going to have to deal with this stuff as others suggested, try to steer around it. If you have to ride over it try to stay relaxed and don't initiate any steering inputs or hard braking -- just apply enough steering pressure to counter the snow plow effects on your front wheel which may or may not track straight through the debris depending on how deep it is. If you're leaning hard into a corner and find yourself staring at sand, silt or wet/frozen stuff in the apex you may be in trouble if you're bike handling skills aren't sharp since you'll need to decelerate rapidly enough to stand the bike up to cross the debris field and then overcompensate with an aggressive countersteering input to get yourself back into your riding line once you've cleared it. Add too much speed on a two lane mountain road with on-coming vehicle traffic and you can see where this gets dicey. See comments above regarding "anticipation".
TandemGeek is offline  
Old 04-24-03, 07:05 AM
  #7  
MichaelW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Posts: 12,952
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
When you are just riding along, you dont need much traction to keep on course, but around a corner, your tyres need traction to turn the bike. With sand, you lose most of your traction, so try and avoid turning on the sand patch. If you do hit it and slide, there is some recovery you can do, turning your bars into the direction of slide, it takes some practice.
On one club ride, a whole bunch of us on assorted bikes hit a sand patch around a corner. Almost everone recovered, including roadies, touring bikes, even a tandem + tow-along rig, but a newbie guy on a full-sus MTB wiped out. As Lance says, its not about the bike.
MichaelW is offline  
Old 04-24-03, 07:09 AM
  #8  
deliriou5
It tastes like burning!
 
deliriou5's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: SOUTH Jersey
Posts: 1,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally posted by Cadd
Each time I ride across it, I felt like I was going to fall. I didn't have control of the bike. Is this common?
Here in south jersey, there is sand EVERYWHERE. in fact, this is how i fell and broke my wrist last august. sand is scary no matter what. i always give sand a wide swath now.
deliriou5 is offline  
Old 04-24-03, 08:10 PM
  #9  
roadbuzz
Just ride.
 
roadbuzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: C-ville, Va
Posts: 3,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally posted by livngood
If you have to ride over it try to stay relaxed
Good point, which reminds me of another... If you have to ride through it and things go awry, stay cool, try to ride with it and keep your head. I've been surprised at some of the messes I've recovered from. Granted, some nearly required a change of shorts afterwards.
roadbuzz is offline  
Old 04-24-03, 08:21 PM
  #10  
VegasCyclist
suitcase of courage
 
VegasCyclist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: SoCal (ex Las Vegas, NV)
Posts: 1,010
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally posted by Dutchy
That's what make the Paris-Roubaix so special.
and often times painful

anyhow in regards to sand/silt/gravel/ice if you ever ride in a big group or an organized ride, 'most' people call out hazards if they see them first, so be aware of what people are shouting out, or if you are in the front call it out for others
__________________
-VegasCyclist
"Daddy made whiskey and he made it well.... cost two dollars and it burned like hell...."
Register!
VegasCyclist is offline  
Old 04-24-03, 08:57 PM
  #11  
Cadd
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 1,452
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for the suggestions, I will keep these in mind the next time I encounter sand patches.

I've also found out accelerating while on sand won't do you any good either (I almost found out the hard way)
Cadd is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.