Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Jacques Anquetil's pedalling style

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Jacques Anquetil's pedalling style

Reply

Old 05-03-03, 11:47 AM
  #1  
denbrewers
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Riga, Latvia
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Jacques Anquetil's pedalling style

I was born wa-a-y too late, unfortunately. So I didn't get the chance to see Jacques Anquetil in action. But wasn't he able to hammer away rather differently from the way other roadies did (and still do)? I've heard his pedalling style refered to as 'ankling', 'parallel (leg/arm power) technique'. In a nutshell, it is something to do with the way you direct the power at the pedal axle - 'parallel to the pulling line of the arms' - I've read somewhere. And I'm wondering what it all means. Does anyone know more on that? I've read a comment at cyclingnews.com that he pedalled with his whole body, rather than just the legs alone - by sharing the work load between the upper and lower body parts. So what are they all talking about? Could anyone enlighten me on that style?

Many thanx
Den Brewers
denbrewers is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-03, 09:49 AM
  #2  
Xavier
Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 531
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Jaquse Anqutil padaling was NOT ankeling. Quite the opposite. Ankleing is when you drop your ankle on the down stroke. Anquetil was more pointed down (the opposite). Actually not very efficient pedaling but as I tell everyone. Everyone is different. It worked for him as he was used to it and accustomed to it.

Same as the position of many riders out there. Some are not very good, but they are used to it and they produce with it. That is why there are custom biks and such.

That s why I never believed in sizing formulas or even worse, websites that 'spit' put sizes. Everyone is different and has different styles.

Anquetil learned to pedal like that and it worked.

I do not know of any current riders with that pedaling technique.
__________________
Xavier Cintron - www.bullteksports.com
Xavier is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-03, 10:33 AM
  #3  
ParamountScapin
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 898
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Not sure about Anquetil's style, but I believe it was in Lemond's book that he states that the proper pedalling style consists of pushing forward with the lower leg when the foot is in about the 9 o'clock position and pulling back when in about the 3 o'clock position. This, rather than pulling up from the bottom and pushing down from the top. I have been trying to pay attention to this for the past several months and it seems to work pretty well. I hope to get to the point of not having to think about it. Just becomes the way I pedal. Think Lemond also said to think of driving one's knee to the handlebar when on the upstroke. Whatever, he and Anquetil seemed to get it right for themselves, based on results.
ParamountScapin is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-03, 10:53 AM
  #4  
denbrewers
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Riga, Latvia
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanx, Xavier, for the reply. I think 'Matre Anquetil' was acrually born to his distinctive style, rather than he learned or acquired it, as he matured as a racer. Witness to that - he won his first TT Words at a tender age of 19, back in the 60s, completely rewriting then-existant rules for gear selection, RPMs and body positioning in the process. I do agree with you that it'd be impossible, and need I say, absolutely unjustifiable, to copy what the man did in the saddle. It's like with M.Schumacher in F1, as E.Irvine can tell you, as R.Barrichelo can tell you.

Consider Armstrong. He's raised up R.Heras and T.Hamilton as mature world-class cyclists in their own right. They do exactly the stuff Armstrong does in their training, he shares all his secrets with the two. He even shares the house with Hamilton in Jerone, Spain. But at the end of the day none of these guys, terrific as they are, can match Armstrong's pace if he puts his mind to it, be it in TT or climbing. He's always able to pull-out that extra 10% and shake off all of his wheel-sitters. Armstrong will always have an upper hand on his proteges simply because he's got that illusive 'master stroke' or 'talent'. And in cycling, as in any other sport, this counts more than perserverance, I think. But let's be also mindful of the fact that Armstrong was brought up as a racer by another genius - the 'Grand Miguel', Miguel Indurain, that is. So if one talent passes on his skills to another - it does seem to work.

Geniuses are born, you can't learn to become one. The only thing one can do is just stay back and marvel at them. Anyway, this is what geniuses are born for - to be admired and looked up to, but not copied.

And, of course, all sizing formulas or websites that 'spit' put sizes are a lot of rubbish. I don't believe any serious rider trusts them either. But, having said that, I do believe they are good for new- comers, as a reference guide, to get themselves started. Bikefit - a well-known swindling institution would be a good example here. None of us resort to it, because it's just a waste of money and, I dear say, it has no scientific foundation to it whatsoever. But, for my money, for those looking into getting their first bike set up having themselves 'bikefited' would be the best alternative. Provided, they do it once, that is. For example, ball-over-pedal-axle issue. We, mature roadies all know that this is all a bag of rubbish and don't get swayed by whatever 'experts' at LBS are bending over backwards in trying to convince us of. We all do it our own way. But we do it because we already know what works for us and what doesn't. But put yourself into a new-comer's shoes - where else can he put his ball other than - yep - smack over the spindle. So that they can ride 500 - 800 miles and learn for themselves where their toes and heels fall naturally and what style of cycling they're in, or imagine themselves in. And it goes so with any fitting issue - handlebars, hoods positioning, top tube and stem lengths, saddle height and seat angle.

I think, that cycling in itself is one l-long-l-long process of learning and self-education. It teaches you to listen to your body more than any other sport. It might teach you discipline and self-respect. But there's always a long learning curve attached to it.

Den Brewers
denbrewers is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-03, 12:26 AM
  #5  
dexmax
road siklista
 
dexmax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Perlas ng Silanganan
Posts: 1,469

Bikes: Custom Knolly Chilcotin Limited Edition Orange, Dartmoor Wish, KHS 7500, Custom built Specialized Camber, S-Works Road, Cannondale Trail mtb, Polini MTB

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We all do it our own way. But we do it because we already know what works for us and what doesn't.
I agree..

LBS guys tend to teach us thier style that, in thier case --worked for them... And in some cases, may work for us too.. But this all depends on how you ride, the routes you take, and the distance you make... We, in the end develop our own styles... It may be a variation of the style of our mentor, or completely different.. What works, works...
dexmax is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-03, 04:50 AM
  #6  
NuTz4BiKeZ
Addicted to Tinkering
 
NuTz4BiKeZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 191
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I agree on the own style comments... I tend to ride quite toe down, and with toes bent a little, I don't know if it's good or bad I just seem to do it that way.
I don't know anyone that has a similar style... Maybe I'm just strange
NuTz4BiKeZ is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-03, 02:55 PM
  #7  
ShinyBaldy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 362
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally posted by denbrewers
Consider Armstrong. He's raised up R.Heras and T.Hamilton as mature world-class cyclists in their own right.
???? Heras was a talented climber before Armstrong even won the Tour de France. Heras signed up with USPS in 20001 - how could he have been "raised" by Armstrong?
ShinyBaldy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-03, 03:06 PM
  #8  
R600DuraAce
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: NYC
Posts: 915
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hahahaha....I am learning to pedal like him. I like it. I can spin a lot better and faster on the big ring. I only pedal down when I am hammering.
R600DuraAce is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-03, 03:10 PM
  #9  
pgreene
Sneaky Slow
 
pgreene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Greenville, SC
Posts: 398
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
heras was a talented climber. now he's an elite climber. maybe it's because he's coming into his own, maybe it's because he's learned something from lance. who's to say?

i pedal toes-down often, always have. i drop my heels every now and again, just to stretch. but i think, like everyone else says, go with what works best for you. you can try to pedal like lance, and it might work. it might not, too. do whatever makes your bike move from point a to point b the fastest with the least amount of effort.
pgreene is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-03, 03:20 AM
  #10  
denbrewers
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Riga, Latvia
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally posted by ShinyBaldy
???? Heras was a talented climber before Armstrong even won the Tour de France. Heras signed up with USPS in 20001 - how could he have been "raised" by Armstrong?
So why has he ditched the Kelme boys then? I remember in all the interviews he gave at the time, Heras was adamant he chose USPS not for money's sake, but to be up there with the best man in business - L.A., that is. He also expressed the view that Kelme was beginning to hamper his development as a racer and that he got lured by the USPS simply because he'd realised that was the only team that would enable him to get where he wanted to be at the end - right there at the very top of the elite peloton - and remain there long after.

To the point now. Heras indeed was talented back then. He's always been, otherwise he hadn't been approached by J.Brunell at the 2000 Tours de France in the first place. Remember, USPS team signs up only the cream-de-la-cream. They don't lumber with the second best. If they see the guy's got the future, they'd be all over him and wouldn't let him go anywhere else other than to their team. But talent is just that - it's still 99% of pure sweat if you wanna get to the top and outrun all the other guys. In 2002 we've seen a very different Roberto. He's had his training and techique completely revamped. Remember the 2002 La Vuelta? It wasn't R.Heras we've seen before. For one thing he was trying to replicate Lance's style - revving at a smolish gear at high RPM - the techique mastered by Lance to the full. But there was more to it than adopting a new technique. He's had his attitude to racing completely changed as well. He became more focused on his riding. He was not a MrGood Guy any more. 'L'Americano' had an attitude more like of a cold-blooded serial murderer. Merciless. Uncompromising, unshattering. He didn't take chances any more, but all his moves were calculated to the nicety. It was at that very time when he ditched his long-time girlfriend I got married to a glamour model. I've never seen him like that. At the tour he knew exactly where his legs would be at their best and where the rivals would have nothing to do about it. These are all the signs of true maturity. But I also remember Roberto at the tour talking on the phone to Lance - to get some advice and encouragement, I would imagine - on every stage day. In fact Lance has been overseeing the whole event - from far beyond. And surprise-surprise, 'L'Americano' gave full credit for his terrific showing at the tour not to the USPS team but to L.A.! - who was thousands miles away from there. Remember, unlike at the 2000 tour, where he had the whole Kelme squad at his disposal, in 2002 he was all by himself against the whole peloton, for the USPS were unable to play a shot gun for him very well (It is my strong belief that without Slava Ekimov and Lance, USPS becomes less of an elite-class team, for it's down to these two guys for making the squad what it is best known for). And that credit given by Heras to Armstrong may only imply that it was Lance who tought him what it takes to be the winner, and how to go against all odds, and ride in the face of stronger competitors.

My poit is, Roberto had enormous talent back then, there's no doubt about that. And I've expressed the view that talent needed to be nurtured and developed in a way that it was safe to be brought into the big sport - and at the right time - and last long after you're past the prime of your years. Otherwise you risk the danger of burning yourself out too soon. Look at the current Italian riders. They sparkle, kindle and then they dissapear out of our sight for ever, holding out 2 seasons at the most. This is why a true masters' tuition or attention is indespensible for a talented person. And when that happens - things can only get better since then. You just start competing in the class of your own.

By the way, Lance has got another up-and-coming charge under his wings - Van de Vellde. What he did at the TT stage at 2002 Vuelta left many shocked and wondering where they guy got all that speed from. The answer is - from Lance of course. So, to the best of my knowledge Lance has helped to develop no less than three top-class athletes, and there are more to come. Watch out for van Hesswick!

Den Brewers

- Where do you come from?
- Way above your league.

Last edited by denbrewers; 05-09-03 at 11:50 AM.
denbrewers is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-03, 10:57 AM
  #11  
OB1knobe
Member
 
OB1knobe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Chatham, Ontario
Posts: 35
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
To see 'Maitre Jacques' in action get the video from World Cycling Publications, by the same name. It's a great video for anyone interested in cycling, particularly the history of the sport. There are some terrific scenes with The Master at speed and you can see his beautiful pedaling action. Something to behold!

Anquetil's style was not 'ankling'. I can't think of any pro racers that ever used this technique, (except when climbing) which was promoted by English cyclo tourists way back when. It's a good technique for those new to cycling who need to learn efficient pedaling, and for those who ride at a more relaxed pace. I used 'ankling' when I first began to ride 'seriously' but gave it up as I got into racing more. (no, I'm not English, but I grew up in a British colony)

I think Francesco Moser's style is somewhat similiar to Anquetil's, except that his back is flatter at speed. Now there's another beautiful pedaler.
OB1knobe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-03, 01:35 PM
  #12  
ncr
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 23
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Anquetil's style cannot be copied because it is 95 percent mental,
different muscles are used in very different ways. What Anquetil
did was reproduce the same powerful out of the saddle method
of pedaling when in a relaxed seated position, making it possible to use the upper body, with all the leg power being generated
in the hips, but most important of all the advantages that
his technique has to offer is the instant and complete cure for
even the worst form of persistant severe on the bike lower back
pain. On that video the team masseur makes a statement
about the difference between Anquetil's back and the backs of
all his team mates. The masseur believed that Anquetil's
mysterious extra power came from his strong back but the
opposite is true, Anquetil's pedalling from the hips shaped and
strengthened his back while the backs of all the other riders
were under continuous strain every time they rode their bikes.
Anquetil's style is linear, it cannot be copied but can be acquired
by anyone with a will to do so, such as a victim of that back pain
who has been forced out of cycling by that continuous torture.
It cannot be explained in forums, it has to explained and demonstrated in detail in person.
The best medical experts have failed to find the cause and cure
for cycling's back pain, simply because the root cause of it is the
round pedalling style, on which all their research is based.
ncr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-03, 05:02 AM
  #13  
denbrewers
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Riga, Latvia
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally posted by ncr
The best medical experts have failed to find the cause and cure for cycling's back pain, simply because the root cause of it is the round pedalling style, on which all their research is based.
That's very true. I also think with 'going in circles' you actually overstraining the weaker set of muscles - the ones we use to pull up the pedals on the up-stroke. The problem is, everything in human physiology tells us that it's far easier for us to push on the pedals, than to pull them up. Our bodies are more conditioned to pushing actions. Like walking. And I can see a trend developing among the racing TT elite - to really mash on the pedals at high gears, rather than spin them 'in smooth circles' in the last couple of years. Witness... er... - Santy Botero at the latest Worlds in Belgium. He was all over the place, I remember. But that didn't matter because he won by quite a margin, as far as I can remember, leaving the 'spinners' lagging far behind. This is all not new to cycling, of course. In the past it was quite common for time trialists to yank on the pedals for all their worth and pull on the bars really hard, swinging the upper body from side to side. Nowadays this style is frawned upon by coaches and co-riders in the peloton. I've been always yelled at and penalised by my coach, I remember, for that.

Buit it's all coming back now. However, let's be mindful of the fact that adoptation of this style should be strictly down to a rider's physiology and system resources - it takes up a lot of energy and you need to be quite a powerful athlete for that.


Originally posted by ncr
Anquetil's style is linear, it cannot be copied but can be acquired by anyone with a will to do so, such as a victim of that back pain who has been forced out of cycling by that continuous torture. It cannot be explained in forums, it has to explained and demonstrated in detail in person.
Very true as well. As sure as eggs is eggs, action speaks louder than words. I've got to see it for myself, that's for sure. So, I'd better get the video.

I appreciate all the replies I got on this thread for the quarry. I'm very pleased there still many cycling enthusiasts who cherish the sports' past and its heroes. And this is what makes cycling so special for all of us here. I hope, you'll agree with me on that. Take care and enjoy yourselves there!

Den Brewers
denbrewers is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-03, 10:56 AM
  #14  
jkoman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Paso Robles Ca.
Posts: 382
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I personally have switched to the "Jibofffo Method". For those unaware, documented increase in avg. climbing speed of up to 12%. What is the method you might ask??? Requires a special mouthpiece with a large hole in the middle...a piece of surgical tubing attached to each side that attaches to small connectors on the handlebars. When climbing steep grades just insert mouthpiece...sit up...place hands on each thigh as far out as comfortable and push on the down stroke while steering with head and mouth. Just don't try and talk to team manager. Also experienced complications when a bee flew through hole...ouch! Now this 195lber climbs with the best of them. Cycling Federation was set to approve them...felt that anyone who could steer with mouth should be allowed, then denied due to lack of rider communication. Mt. Whitney here I come. I am also working on a velcro wrap with handle for leg in order to assist in spinning...need to pull as well as push, right? I am expecting to get another 2-3% increase in overall climbing speed...will update you, Peace
jkoman is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-03, 08:22 AM
  #15  
Bruco
Wind Breaker
 
Bruco's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: In the Dutch mountains
Posts: 802
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally posted by denbrewers
Armstrong will always have an upper hand on his proteges simply because he's got that illusive 'master stroke' or 'talent'. And in cycling, as in any other sport, this counts more than perserverance, I think. [...] Geniuses are born, you can't learn to become one. The only thing one can do is just stay back and marvel at them. Anyway, this is what geniuses are born for - to be admired and looked up to, but not copied.
Den, you are making sense, so don't get me wrong.

However, as far as I know, the 'pre-comeback' Armstrong was a different rider from the current Tour dominator in many ways. I have read that his technique was not that great then. Much of his trademarks (round pedalling, high cadence, etc.) are actually the result of hard training and good coaching. So the 'master stroke' did not come all by itself...

Good news for us wannabees?
Bruco is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-03, 05:16 AM
  #16  
denbrewers
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Riga, Latvia
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally posted by Bruco
Den, you are making sense, so don't get me wrong.

...the 'pre-comeback' Armstrong was a different rider from the current Tour dominator in many ways... his technique was not that great then. Much of his trademarks... are actually the result of hard training and good coaching. So the 'master stroke' did not come all by itself...

Good news for us wannabees?
I didn't get you wrong, Bruco. I see what you're getting at. And you're right. Possessing a talent doesn't exuse one from having to sweat his nuts off.

But behold, I'm about to bring 'all us wannabees' some sad news (and the worst one is yet to come).

I never said Armstrong's genius was in his technique. (I did exress this view with reference to J.Anquitell, though). But Armstrong nevertheless still possess terrific talent. I beg to differ on the point that he was an average rider before he went down with cancer. After all you don't win the Cycling Worlds title whilst cruising, do you - and he was a young lad back then, wasn't he? I think what you ment, Bruno, was that Armstrong wasn't excelling at climbing back then. That's very true. Weighing in at 86+ kilos 'he was built more like a American Football player, rather than a cyclist' - I've seen a comment posted somewhere on the Web. Then he went down with that thing, shed some good 20 lbs worth of weight, made children and all that... Then he moved to Spain to take lessons from Miguel Indurain...

Ah... Indurain... Had it not been for that Man, we wouldn't have pleasure of seeing Lance anywhere near the top place on the podium at TDFs. Ullrichs, Belocki's, Boteros and Gonzalleses would have taken his place. But that was not meant to happen.

Back in autumn 1996 history was being made. After one particularly harsh climbing training session Indurain drove up to Lance and suggested switching all the way down and trying to maintain spinning rate at 95 rpm for some time and then seeing how it goes. Which Armstrong did. And it didn't go particularly well though. But (the true sing of a die-hard character!) he came back and did it again, and the same - the day after. And the day after that... And then the next day...

The truth is, it was not Lance who thought he possessed 'a genious streak' or something. It was Indurain (!) who actually told Armstrong that he had somethig about his whole body that none other in the peloton had (with some notable exceptions). It was not about the technique. It was 'not about the bike'
It was about the way the metabolic processes functioned in his system that were making all the difference. It appeared Lance had his lactate threshold positioned very high and, what's more important, there was still some place in reserve for him to imrove it even more. What that meant was that his whole body called for spinning at low gear at high rpm and for lengthy periods of time. What he's discovered since then was that he was able to maintain high pace on a climb, whilst out of saddle, for hours on end (not hours exactly, of course, but still for some good half an hour with no let-up whatsoever!) - and still have his heart rates way below the much dreaded 'red zone'. What it amounts to in competition? Watch your TDF climbing stages' tapes once again and see for yourself.

Just count how long Armstrong is able to crank in out-or-the-saddle position and at what cadence. Then find a suitable rise and try to do the same. (I'm sure we've all done it already though .) But as I watch the elite cyclists who were rubbing sholders with Lance on those climbs come back to to Alpe d'Ez trying to figure out why and where they lose out, I'm think I know just the answer. Sure, 'it's not about the bike'!

Now watch the faces of some of those riders on the tape. It's all written there, isn't it? 'What a fool am I! The hell I'm trying to go after him - no frigging way!' or 'Damn, not again! Here we go again. Well, we can't do anything about it, can we?' - can be read easily. Unless it is Ulrich's face you're watching - it is as deadpan as ever. But watch Kivilev's, Beloki's, Mayo's, Frigo's, Gonzaless', Sevillia's - they do tell you the whole story - much better in fact than they would after the ride in the interviews or at team briefings.

So much for the 'good' news for all of us wannabes. A lot of people tried. They try it every year. They train hard. They get signed up by the best teams in business. But when it comes to the crunch, Armstong's always in his own league. And I'm sure the situation will not change at this year's TDF as well. My top 3 for the tour: 1. Armstrong, 2.Hamilton 3.Beloki

The bottom line, although Armstong's trademark is the climbing technique, it stems from his physiology - he's more suited to that style and that's all there is to it. As simple as that. But talent is just that - you may have it and don't care a damn. However, Lance's true genius became evident after he's had that talent of his fostered, nurtured, raised and put to a good use - not entirely without full buckets of sweat, tears (of joy and frustration) and the helluva bum-beating. My hat goes off to his wife, though, for her ability to put up with all that for so long. But she obviously had to draw the line somewhere. When it's enough, it's enough. We're all only human after all

Last edited by denbrewers; 05-14-03 at 05:38 AM.
denbrewers is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-03, 06:12 AM
  #17  
Bruco
Wind Breaker
 
Bruco's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: In the Dutch mountains
Posts: 802
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks, Den, for the thorough update! It once again demonstrated how 'hors catégorie' some (in my case: all) pro cyclists are.

I didn't know that Don Miguel (who himself was more of a high gear pusher, wasn't he?) actually had such an important input in Armstrong's comeback. If I am not mistaking, their joint training sessions aren't mentioned in It's not about the bike. Quite an omission...

One other element of Armstrong's success, I think, is his total devotion to preparation. During the year, he seriously explores and test drives all difficult stretches of the Tour iterinary. This gives him an extra edge over the competition. (His schedule, of course, allows for this...)
Bruco is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-03, 06:52 AM
  #18  
greywolf
aka old dog
 
greywolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: tauranga New Zealand
Posts: 1,173
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Jacques Anquetil , my hero when I was a teenager
I agree with all thats been said about bike fit ect . the body adjusts it self to different conditions , a mm here a cm there does`nt make a lot of differance , Cycling & bikes isnt the exact science they try to make out it is or should I say ,they would like it to be, Jacques & Lance would ride most of us into the road even if they were riding old roadster`s with rusty chains
greywolf is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-03, 06:58 AM
  #19  
denbrewers
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Riga, Latvia
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally posted by Bruco
One other element of Armstrong's success, I think, is his total devotion to preparation. During the year, he seriously explores and test drives all difficult stretches of the Tour iterinary. This gives him an extra edge over the competition. (His schedule, of course, allows for this...)
I can't agree more with you on that. Never in the months of Sundays does he take it easy. As sure as eggs is eggs attention to slightest details and pro-active thinking is what makes him one of the legendary figures in cycling (I know, I know, many of you out there would disagree with me on that, saying, he's still got quite a mountain to climb before he gets to the top 10. But, for my money, he's deserved to be there).

It's good you mention this though. Armstrong and his team mates are notorious for practicing on courses featured in races during the season. He's incorporated it into his team's training routine.



Don Miguel... was more of a high gear pusher, wasn't he?
He sure was. He was more of an average climber as well. But again, we're talking psysiology here. He was tall, quite strong built. And he was well aware he'd never make it into climbing. But, you see, he had all that knowledge, he's been among the greatest in business - and he couldn't find the application for that knowledge - until he saw Lance's heart rate figures. And that made him realise the full potential of Lance as a climber. Well, what else could he do but to say, 'Go for it, Lance!'.

Nice talking to you, take care

Den Brewers

Last edited by denbrewers; 05-14-03 at 07:08 AM.
denbrewers is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-03, 07:03 AM
  #20  
denbrewers
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Riga, Latvia
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally posted by greywolf
Jacques & Lance would ride most of us into the road even if they were riding old roadster`s with rusty chains
Spot on, Grey Wolf! Ladies and gentlemen, a round of applause!!!

Ahh-ar-r! This is the very bike I ride these days, weighing in at 38 lbs. Good training. Excellent ride. Make a mental note of that

Den Brewers
denbrewers is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-03, 07:16 AM
  #21  
Richard Cranium
Senior Member
 
Richard Cranium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Deep in the Shawnee Forest
Posts: 2,867

Bikes: LeMond - Gunnar

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Not too oversimplify, but does't each great rider always have a knack or "skill" that shows up in particular riding situations?

I would suggest that we each learn a given pedal technique that is fairly efficient for each of us. Then we go about trying to "train" ourselves to continue using the "perfect stroke" for greater periods of effort, in the face of "greater fatigue"....

Great riders do this so well it becomes quite noticable.

Other riders never learn, but they're way behind you......
Richard Cranium is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-03, 07:37 AM
  #22  
Bruco
Wind Breaker
 
Bruco's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: In the Dutch mountains
Posts: 802
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally posted by denbrewers
again, we're talking psysiology here. He was tall, quite strong built. And he was well aware he'd never make it into climbing. But, you see, he had all that knowledge, he's been among the greatest in business - and he couldn't find the application for that knowledge - until he saw Lance's heart rate figures.
As regards physiology, Don Miguel's defining feature probably was his heart. If I remember correctly, that was HUGE, in terms of size and pumping power. It always made the doctors wondering... :confused:

As regards the 'we are not worthy' postings here, I can only agree with them.
Bruco is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service