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Just used Comp. Cylist Fit Calculator - advice from more experienced here needed

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Just used Comp. Cylist Fit Calculator - advice from more experienced here needed

Old 02-06-07, 10:02 PM
  #1  
Telix
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Just used Comp. Cylist Fit Calculator - advice from more experienced here needed

I just had my lady measure me and we entered the numbers into the Competitive Cyclists calculator. I understand that this is just a starting point, but I'm looking at used bikes on eBay and craigslist so knowing what is going to fit well based on measurements alone is going to help a lot.

Here is what we came up with:
Measurements
-------------------------------------------
Inseam: 85
Trunk: 68
Forearm: 37
Arm: 66
Thigh: 62.5
Lower Leg: 57
Sternal Notch: 147
Total Body Height: 181


The Competitive Fit (cm)
-------------------------------------------
Seat tube range c-c: 55.1 - 55.6
Seat tube range c-t: 56.8 - 57.3
Top tube length: 56.5 - 56.9
Stem Length: 11.8 - 12.4
BB-Saddle Position: 75.8 - 77.8
Saddle-Handlebar: 55.8 - 56.4
Saddle Setback: 5.5 - 5.9
Seatpost Type: NON-SETBACK


The Eddy Fit (cm)
-------------------------------------------
Seat tube range c-c: 56.3 - 56.8
Seat tube range c-t: 58.0 - 58.5
Top tube length: 56.5 - 56.9
Stem Length: 10.7 - 11.3
BB-Saddle Position: 75.0 - 77.0
Saddle-Handlebar: 56.6 - 57.2
Saddle Setback: 6.7 - 7.1
Seatpost Type: SETBACK


The French Fit (cm)
-------------------------------------------
Seat tube range c-c: 58.0 - 58.5
Seat tube range c-t: 59.7 - 60.2
Top tube length: 57.7 - 58.1
Stem Length: 10.9 - 11.5
BB-Saddle Position: 73.3 - 75.3
Saddle-Handlebar: 58.3 - 58.9
Saddle Setback: 6.2 - 6.6
Seatpost Type: SETBACK
I am 5-11 with pretty short legs - I wear pants with a 30-31" inseam usually. So I was surprised that it suggested such tall frame sizes for me! I just wondered if anyone with more experience with me could take a look at their numbers and see if they were ludicrous or not. I'm a beginner roadie so I'd probably want to start with the Eddy fit. The Trek 1000 in 58 comes out to be the perfect frame for me, but I never thought I'd be fitted to a 58cm frame.
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Old 02-06-07, 10:09 PM
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clausen
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TT is the most inportant measurement. You can adjust your saddle for leg length. If your just starting out I'd go to a LBS and get there opinion and start a relationship. Good to help find group rides and help with other aspects of the sport.
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Old 02-06-07, 10:28 PM
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Originally Posted by clausen
TT is the most inportant measurement. You can adjust your saddle for leg length. If your just starting out I'd go to a LBS and get there opinion and start a relationship. Good to help find group rides and help with other aspects of the sport.

you beat me to it. When looking at the bikes, just completely ignore the size which has such wide variation anyway from measurement differences and compact to standard frames. As it says in the fit guide - look at that top tube measurement. That is key.

Finding a frame with a 56cm to 57cm top tube will open up lots of frames as that is a very common number. No you should not be on a 58cm Trek. That has a 57.3cm effective top tube - too long. You are likely better on a 56cm in the Trek. Frames by the Eddy fit virtually don't exist anymore. A bike based on the Eddy fit looks very big by todays standards with very little exposed seatpost, but a reasonable top tube length. Finding frames that have a 2cm shorter top tube than seat tube (based on standard configuraiton frame) are getting rare.
Based on your other measurements you shouldn't have a problem with head tube height so the proper sized top tube bike should have good bar drop with minor adjustments of spacers or stem angles.

So as you are looking at bikes, go to the website and look at the geometry table. Effective Top tube is what you are after. Compact geometry frames will list both exact top tube length and effective top tube. Just look at that effective top tube. I'd suggest going with the competitive fit, but reducing the stem length by 1cm (more the Eddy fit stem length). This will provide a bit more comfort.

As for setback vs. non-setback post, you are right on the edge and your saddle setback will take some trial and error and may be based on the components you have. The right setback will mean long term comfort, or riding hell from placing too much pressure forward on your pelvic bones/perinium area instead of sit bones.
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Old 02-06-07, 11:34 PM
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The recommended seat tube length does seem a bit long for your height. Although top tube length is important, the seat tube length should also not be ignored when sizing a frame. For non-compact frame geometry, ST length (c-c) is a good indicator of *head tube length*. So for example if you choose a seat tube length that is too short you can end up with a very short head tube which means that your handlebar height will be well below your saddle, unless you use lots of spacers or a stem with a high degree of rise. If your ST length is too long, then the head tube length may also be too long, making it difficult to achieve a good saddle-to-handlebar drop. A long ST also means that there may be little clearance between your crotch and the top tube.
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