Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Tubular flats...

Old 03-04-07, 08:07 AM
  #1  
unbelievably
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
unbelievably's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Under the Thumb
Posts: 1,362
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Tubular flats...

How does one deal with having a punctured tubular while on the road?
unbelievably is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 08:10 AM
  #2  
ElJamoquio
Burning Matches.
 
ElJamoquio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 9,711

Bikes: Motobecane Le Champion SL, Cervelo P2SL

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2576 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 24 Posts
The car behind you gives you a brand new wheel.
__________________
"The only good race pace is suicide pace, and today looks like a good day to die."
-Steve Prefontaine
ElJamoquio is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 08:12 AM
  #3  
unbelievably
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
unbelievably's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Under the Thumb
Posts: 1,362
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Does tire cut resistance technology apply to tubulars?
unbelievably is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 08:22 AM
  #4  
Grasschopper
He drop me
 
Grasschopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Central PA
Posts: 11,646

Bikes: '03 Marin Mill Valley, '02 Eddy Merckx Corsa 0.1, '12 Giant Defy Advance, '13 Salsa Vaya

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 123 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by unbelievably
Does tire cut resistance technology apply to tubulars?
Yes for sure. I haven't had a flat in a year on tubulars...if I get a flat that my Tufo sealant doesn't fill I will call it in. Loosing one ride a year isn't going to bother me much.
__________________
The views expressed by this poster do not reflect the views of BikeForums.net.
Grasschopper is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 08:24 AM
  #5  
DM4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 196
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You pull the tire off the rim. Put on your spare. Inflate the spare. The air pressure of the inflated tire will keep the tire on the rim. Just don't do any high speed cornering.
DM4 is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 08:25 AM
  #6  
dsb137
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Dahlonega, GA
Posts: 267
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I take the spare out from under the seat and change it... You just have to be mindful not to take corners too hard until you re-glue the tire...
dsb137 is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 10:14 AM
  #7  
DiabloScott
It's MY mountain
 
DiabloScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Mt.Diablo
Posts: 8,652

Bikes: Klein, Merckx, Trek

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2241 Post(s)
Liked 76 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by DM4
You pull the tire off the rim. Put on your spare. Inflate the spare. The air pressure of the inflated tire will keep the tire on the rim. Just don't do any high speed cornering.
More importantly, don't use the brake for that wheel on long descents. An unglued tire is much more likely to creep than to roll. Get plenty of pressure in there and you can corner pretty hard (a fact, not a recommendation).
DiabloScott is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 11:26 AM
  #8  
nitropowered
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Athens, Ohio
Posts: 5,104

Bikes: Custom Custom Custom

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by unbelievably
Does tire cut resistance technology apply to tubulars?
The New Continental Competition tires have a Velcran layer like a lot of the clincher tires they offer. However at $100-120 a pop, they aren't cheap.
nitropowered is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 12:22 PM
  #9  
dgasmd
shedding fat
 
dgasmd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: South Florida
Posts: 3,149

Bikes: LOOK 595 Ultra/Campy Record 10Sp, restored Guerciotti/Campy C-Record 6 Sp, TIME RXR/Campy SR 11Sp, and Colnago C-60 with Campagnolo SR 11sp.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have never done this, but a LBS told me that I could pre-glue the spare and let the glue dry. The fold it and stowe it away. When I get a flat I change tires and the glue on the rim from my previous tire and the glue from the new tire will act as contact cement and be more than plenty. Anyone do this********************???
__________________
Arguing with ignorant people is an exercise in futility. They will bring you down to their level and once there they will beat you with their overwhelming experience.
dgasmd is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 12:36 PM
  #10  
San Rensho 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 5,704
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 161 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 9 Posts
Changing a tubular flat is much easier and faster than changing a clincher. If you are not going to fix the flat (its like doing abdominal surgery on a snake), just slit across the tire, grab one end and peal the tire off, put new tire on.

And yes, if your spare is brand new, put some glue on it, let it dry completely and then roll it up.
__________________
Il faut de l'audace, encore de l'audace, toujours de l'audace

1980 3Rensho-- 1975 Raleigh Sprite 3spd
1990s Raleigh M20 MTB--2007 Windsor Hour (track)
1988 Ducati 750 F1
San Rensho is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 12:52 PM
  #11  
BikeWise1
30 YR Wrench
 
BikeWise1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Oxford, OH
Posts: 2,007

Bikes: Waterford R-33, Madone 6.5, Trek 520

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by San Rensho
Changing a tubular flat is much easier and faster than changing a clincher. If you are not going to fix the flat (its like doing abdominal surgery on a snake), just slit across the tire, grab one end and peal the tire off, put new tire on.

And yes, if your spare is brand new, put some glue on it, let it dry completely and then roll it up.
???It takes more than a few seconds for me to pull a well-glued tubey off a rim and I can't imagine cutting an otherwise perfectly good tire because the tube inside it has a pinhole! I can literally change a clincher on the road in less than a couple of minutes. And once it's inflated, I can resume riding without having to be concerned about whether or not I can brake and corner hard.

Tubulars for racing? Absolutely. They stay glued to the rim if you flat and allow a vestige of control. Then you get a new wheel, complete with a properly glued tire. For most other riders, definitely not worth the money vs. performance tradeoff. It's up to the individual to decide. Try 'em. You'll know pretty quick if you feel like dealing with 'em.
BikeWise1 is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 01:35 PM
  #12  
ElJamoquio
Burning Matches.
 
ElJamoquio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 9,711

Bikes: Motobecane Le Champion SL, Cervelo P2SL

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2576 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Originally Posted by San Rensho
Changing a tubular flat is much easier and faster than changing a clincher. If you are not going to fix the flat (its like doing abdominal surgery on a snake), just slit across the tire, grab one end and peal the tire off, put new tire on.

And yes, if your spare is brand new, put some glue on it, let it dry completely and then roll it up.
With how much tubulars cost, and the shear amount of crap on the road in SE Michigan, that would've cost me $1200 last season alone.
__________________
"The only good race pace is suicide pace, and today looks like a good day to die."
-Steve Prefontaine
ElJamoquio is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 02:33 PM
  #13  
kyledr
Destroyer of Worlds
 
kyledr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 446
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Anyone have as much difficulty as I do getting the tire on the rim? Even after stretching it out I find it hard to get it on there. I imagine this would be a problem on the road. The tires I've tried are Tufo S3 Pro and Tufo S33 Pro.
kyledr is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 03:42 PM
  #14  
Bop Gun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: U.S.S.A.
Posts: 161
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Excelllent question. Tubulars seem definitely more flat resistant. On long >2 hr rides I'll take my spare pre-glued folded in a large saddlebag. If it is a shorter ride I'll take a can of the latex sealant. I probably have had 6 or 8 clincher flats on my first 1200 mi on my new Paris. 2 flats in 1400 mi on tubulars.

The first tubular flat was a slow leak that I didnt notice till I got home. The second one (yesterday) was while riding in the rain at 22-23, a large cut causing an instant flat and causing my to nearly crash! It was very unstable. Obviously the goo in the can did not help. It was a short ride, so I had to call it in.

Im still not sure if I wont go out again without the spare on the tubulars. One bagged ride in 1400 mi is not bad.
Bop Gun is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 03:51 PM
  #15  
trackstar10
elite
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: seattle, wa
Posts: 516

Bikes: track, road, cross, fixie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
uh...guys? what about tubular tape. im sure that is a lot easier and quicker to change than gluing when you get home. sure, its not recommended if you race track or pro road race or anything, but it works fine for everything else.
trackstar10 is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 06:42 PM
  #16  
platypus
Style-challenged
 
platypus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 918

Bikes: Colnago C-50 Extreme Power, Bianchi Pista, Somec single-speed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
another aspect to tubulars is that a flat can be ridden on with (imho) much more control than a clincher.
platypus is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 07:24 PM
  #17  
GeraldChan
road curmudgeon, FG rider
 
GeraldChan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Gaithersburg, MD
Posts: 677

Bikes: 1973 Nishiki Professional, 1990 Serotta Colorado II, 2002 Waterford Track

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dgasmd
I have never done this, but a LBS told me that I could pre-glue the spare and let the glue dry. The fold it and stowe it away. When I get a flat I change tires and the glue on the rim from my previous tire and the glue from the new tire will act as contact cement and be more than plenty. Anyone do this********************???
Don't forget to stretch the spare in addition to pre-glueing as you don't want to wrestle with a new tight spare roadside.
As to tubular vs clinchers: I wear out the tread on most of my sew-ups before they flat. Can't say the same for my clincher wheels. I don't race but I prefer the ride and feel of a well built, responsive tubular wheelset. Tires should be high end (in the $75-100 range) or they will riide no better than clinchers.
Gerry
GeraldChan is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 08:15 PM
  #18  
el twe
crotchety young dude
 
el twe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: SF, CA
Posts: 4,818

Bikes: IRO Angus; Casati Gold Line; Redline 925; '72 Schwinn Olympic Paramount

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Went for my first tubular ride last night, got a flat. Quite the buzz kill after putting so much time/money/energy into the whole build, I might just build up some clincher wheels.
__________________
Originally Posted by CardiacKid View Post
I explained that he could never pay me enough cash for the amount of work I had put into that bike and the only way to compensate me for it was to ride the hell out of it.
IRO Angus Casati Gold Line
el twe is offline  
Old 03-04-07, 08:22 PM
  #19  
GeraldChan
road curmudgeon, FG rider
 
GeraldChan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Gaithersburg, MD
Posts: 677

Bikes: 1973 Nishiki Professional, 1990 Serotta Colorado II, 2002 Waterford Track

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by el twe
Went for my first tubular ride last night, got a flat. Quite the buzz kill after putting so much time/money/energy into the whole build, I might just build up some clincher wheels.
I'm sorry to hear about your bad first tubular ride Karma el twe.
Ageing the tires helps greatly in flat prevention. I generally buy tubulars 6-8 months prior to needing to use them. Sew-up require more advanced planning than do clinchers. Send your tire to Tirealert.com and he will replace the tube and base tape for $18. When you score a deal on tubulars buy a bunch and stretch and age them.
Keep at it! The first time you rip a sharp turn at speed with a serious amount of lean you will be a tubular convert.
Gerry
GeraldChan is offline  
Old 03-05-07, 02:11 AM
  #20  
fogrider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: fogtown...san francisco
Posts: 2,276

Bikes: Ron Cooper, Time VXSR, rock lobster, rock lobster, serotta, ritchey, kestrel, paramount

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I tryed the tufo tires...very interesting, I put the sealant in the tire and went for a ride. the tire was ok, not great, but it was not any worse than a clincher tire. after a few months passed, I was riding up a short hill with two guys (I didn't know) on my rear wheel. about two-thirds of the way up, I hear the dreaded sound of air rushing out of a tire...we all know the sound a tire going flat. My heart sank, I did not want to stop. I looked down at my tires to see which one was lossing air, it sounded like the rear. But the sound stopped. the rear is where the tufo was installed. at first, I did not remember the tufo, but sure enough the sealant worked on the fly! I was able finish my ride, no problem...the flat was fixed on the fly.
fogrider is offline  
Old 03-05-07, 02:29 AM
  #21  
Lectron
Made in Norway
 
Lectron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 1,671
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You really don't have to stretch them over a long period of time.
I've many times picked up a new set, stretched it, glued it, another
little stretch and then mount it. Yes, and the sealant works. Another
very nice product is the Vittoria pit stop. Doesn't weight more than a
tube, seals and pump up the tire. The sealant works for additional
3 month.
Lectron is offline  
Old 03-05-07, 05:06 PM
  #22  
kyledr
Destroyer of Worlds
 
kyledr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 446
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
stretch and age them.
Aging is a myth.
kyledr is offline  
Old 03-05-07, 05:26 PM
  #23  
Ritterview
Tandem Vincitur
 
Ritterview's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern California
Posts: 3,317

Bikes: BMC Pro Machine SLC01, Specialized Globe, Burley Rock 'N Roll tandem, Calfee Dragonfly tandem.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
...if I get a flat that my Tufo sealant doesn't fill I will call it in.
(1) Does this mean that you are riding without carrying a spare?

(2) By Tufo sealant, do you mean Tufo tubulars with sealant in situ, or are you carrying a tube with you?

Ritterview is offline  
Old 03-05-07, 05:37 PM
  #24  
Dubbayoo
Senior Member
 
Dubbayoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 7,681

Bikes: Pedal Force QS3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dgasmd
I have never done this, but a LBS told me that I could pre-glue the spare and let the glue dry. The fold it and stowe it away. When I get a flat I change tires and the glue on the rim from my previous tire and the glue from the new tire will act as contact cement and be more than plenty. Anyone do this********************???
I used to do that, but getting the tire off in the first place is still tough. I once road home 4-5 miles on a tube flat because I couldn't get the tire off so I'm pretty sure my glue jobs will hold.

My problem with clinchers is twofold.

1. I carry CO2 and sometimes I have to waste one to find the hole
2. At least half the time I cause a new hole getting the tire back on, probably from my tire lever at which point I'm out of CO2 if step 1.

Last edited by Dubbayoo; 03-05-07 at 05:46 PM.
Dubbayoo is offline  
Old 03-05-07, 05:50 PM
  #25  
urbanknight
In beaurocratic limbo
 
urbanknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 22,456

Bikes: Specialized Allez, K2 Razorback

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ElJamoquio
The car behind you gives you a brand new wheel.
+1000 this is why I ride clinchers on the road and save the tubulars for races and the velodrome.
urbanknight is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.