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Repair stand for carbon frames..

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Repair stand for carbon frames..

Old 05-01-07, 08:53 PM
  #1  
TomRides
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Repair stand for carbon frames..

Howdy all..new to the group and coming to you from the Boston area. Just picked up my first carbon ride, 2006 Roubaix Comp and so far about 100 miles..a little tweaking..and after tonights ride after a fitting session at my LBS..feeling GREAT on the bike! Stock (for now) with Keo Sprints, new Specialized Carbon Comp shoes, Cateye Micro wireless...and thinking about a saddle change..but want to ride it a bit first...

My question, I hear it's not so good to clamp carbon frames, seat posts, etc. onto a repair stand...so what are you carbon riders using? An old alum. seatpost for when you work on your ride, or something else. I saw a Park stand that holds the bike at the fork or dropouts I believe, but really don't want to shell out the $200..also saw a Park dummy seatpost thing that fits into the seat tube for mounting on the stand..just seems like a pain to keep pulling the post and putting it back after working on the bike.

Any input would be great...WHAT DO YOU USE?

In advance....Thanks!

Tom
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Old 05-01-07, 09:18 PM
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Sirrobinofcoxly
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Carbon may be fragile, but the seat post is probably the most robust part of the bike. You can clamp the seatpost with confidence, just don't over do it. The bike probably only weighs 15-17lb anyhow, so you don't need to muscle it to keep it steady. You probably put more pressure on your seat clamp, and that's spread out over a much smaller area than a repair stand clamp. I usually put a rag around the carbon to protect from scratches, and clamp on.

If you remain paranoid, check into this:
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Old 05-01-07, 09:41 PM
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I clamp mine by the carbon seatpost all day long. Just use a little sense about it.
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Old 05-01-07, 10:19 PM
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There is a reason bike manufacturers are using carbon for frames. In one of my materials classes (going to school to be a Mechanical Engineer) they showed us a piece of carbon that was 3 layers thick, 1" diameter around and 2" tall and they put it in a machine to test the compressive stress of it and it didn't crack until over 3 TONS of force were put on it. I know that the carbon being used for bikes isn't that extreme, but carbon is being used for a reason, it's strong and durable, much more than aluminum or steel. The weight of your bike hanging by the seat post is nothing to worry about. Like mentioned above, wrap it in something to keep it from getting scratched, but don't worry about anything breaking.
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Old 05-01-07, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Sirrobinofcoxly
Carbon may be fragile, but the seat post is probably the most robust part of the bike. You can clamp the seatpost with confidence, just don't over do it. The bike probably only weighs 15-17lb anyhow, so you don't need to muscle it to keep it steady. You probably put more pressure on your seat clamp, and that's spread out over a much smaller area than a repair stand clamp. I usually put a rag around the carbon to protect from scratches, and clamp on.

If you remain paranoid, check into this:

I have this stand and it works great. I highly recommend it. First stand I ever bought and well worth the money.

It is so much nicer to clean and maintain on a stand then leaning it against something only for the bike to move,shift and tip over.
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Old 05-01-07, 11:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Bicycle dad
I have this stand and it works great. I highly recommend it. First stand I ever bought and well worth the money.

It is so much nicer to clean and maintain on a stand then leaning it against something only for the bike to move,shift and tip over.
+1

I use this stand too. It's great, only downside is its kinda heavy if you're moving it a lot. Get the lighter race version of it if you plan on moving it a lot.
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Old 05-02-07, 12:17 AM
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I have a Park stand as well and clamp to the seat post whenever I work on my Tarmac. You're hanging less than 20lbs from the post, less if you pull the wheels off, and if your post holds your body weight it isn't going to snap at 20lbs.
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Old 05-02-07, 12:25 AM
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get a cheap-o seatpost, insert in to frame when fixing bike, replace to regular seatpost when riding. if not, be darn careful. oh, btw, don't clamp on your frame. seatpost everytime. seatposts are easier & cheaper to replace than frames.
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Old 05-02-07, 01:13 AM
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Originally Posted by 3MTA3
get a cheap-o seatpost, insert in to frame when fixing bike, replace to regular seatpost when riding. if not, be darn careful. oh, btw, don't clamp on your frame. seatpost everytime. seatposts are easier & cheaper to replace than frames.
What he said
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Old 05-02-07, 02:14 AM
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I don't have a carbon bike but does that park stand in the pic above hold the bike well? Good enough for stuff like crankarm removal?
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Old 05-02-07, 05:36 AM
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Thanks all..the only reason I'm concerned at all is that my LBS where I purchased the bike warned me against clamping the carbon seat post. Certainly know not to clamp the frame, but also don't want to cause any damage to the post that could cause catastrophic results at 30-40mph...or even at 15mph for that matter. They told me to get an old cheap alum. post; and swap out when putting the bike on the stand...just thought it was a bit of a hassle..but I guess not if it gives me piece of mind...

Thanks again for all the replies!
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Old 05-02-07, 06:03 AM
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Usually the warning is about overtightening the seatpost clamp on the frame. I've never heard a warning about a repair stand clamp. But I suppose those quick release lever repair stand clamps could damage the seatpost if they are adjusted wrong.
I've never scratched the seatpost with my Ultimate screw clamp, the rubber cover is easy on the clear coat.
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Old 05-02-07, 06:27 AM
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I've got a Park Stand and I just clamp to the carbon post. I've been doing that for three years without a problem. The Park clamp has a rubber lining so the post isn't marked. The bike is still able to swing left and right so it isn't tight enough to hurt anything. Really the only time the bike is in the stand is for minor work and drivetrain cleanings. If I'm removing cranks and such I start with the bike on the ground and get my wife to aid me by holding the bike Once again a benefit of having a wife who loves to ride too.
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Old 05-02-07, 06:42 AM
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yeah but what do you do when you don't have a seatpost?
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Old 05-02-07, 08:07 AM
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what about resting the bike on the clamp horizontally at the balance point of the top tube
without clamping ?

Also is it safe to lean on a carbon bike and sit on the top tube ?
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Old 05-02-07, 08:19 AM
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Get a steel seatpost then your worries will be over.
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Old 05-02-07, 08:20 AM
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Just loosen bolts with the bike on the ground when you need leverage then hook the saddle over the stand when you need it off the ground.

I have an '87 Peugeot PY-10 with carbon main tubes and I cracked the seat tube by clamping overzealously. Doh. I guess I'll just restore it and hang it on the wall.
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Old 05-02-07, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by merlinextraligh
yeah but what do you do when you don't have a seatpost?
My thoughts exactly, isp(and funny shaped) and a srm mount on the bottom so I cant use the park's lower mounted stand like pictured or the conventional
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Old 05-02-07, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by pschirm
There is a reason bike manufacturers are using carbon for frames. In one of my materials classes (going to school to be a Mechanical Engineer) they showed us a piece of carbon that was 3 layers thick, 1" diameter around and 2" tall and they put it in a machine to test the compressive stress of it and it didn't crack until over 3 TONS of force were put on it. I know that the carbon being used for bikes isn't that extreme, but carbon is being used for a reason, it's strong and durable, much more than aluminum or steel. The weight of your bike hanging by the seat post is nothing to worry about. Like mentioned above, wrap it in something to keep it from getting scratched, but don't worry about anything breaking.
I'm assuming the orientation of the carbon tube was so the loading was axial? If the tube were placed on its side in such a test, I'm sure it wouldn't fair as well. CF is fairly isotropic, and while strong, it is not crush proof.

That being said, I think the majority of owners are a bit paranoid about how fragile their top tubes are. It isn't tin foil, fer cryin' out loud.
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Old 05-02-07, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by eandmwilson
I'm assuming the orientation of the carbon tube was so the loading was axial? If the tube were placed on its side in such a test, I'm sure it wouldn't fair as well. CF is fairly isotropic, and while strong, it is not crush proof.

That being said, I think the majority of owners are a bit paranoid about how fragile their top tubes are. It isn't tin foil, fer cryin' out loud.
NO. You should never clamp the top tube, no matter what the material, it is very easy to deform or crack a top tube while in a stand. These tubes are not designed to be clamped or torqued.

Zinn tells people not to clamp their CF posts, but this is really for those who over-tighten everything, and there are a lot who do this. Bottom support stands like the Park are good for the paranoid, but you have to remove the front wheel every time.
Like everything else, it's common sense, you should just avoid excessive clamping pressure. If you have some ultra expansive, ultra light post, use another type of stand.
 
Old 05-02-07, 10:18 AM
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I wasn't referring to top tube clamping, but the perrenial "Can I lean my bike against the wall and have it touch my top tube?" question.
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Old 05-02-07, 10:19 AM
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not really being discussed here (?)
 
Old 05-02-07, 10:24 AM
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A valid point - my Look has an integrated seatpost that is not round and so will not easily clamp in my Park stand.

I clamp the top tube, but I don't use my shop stand I use my portable stand as it has widely adjustable clamp pressure. I set it so that it's really just stopping the bike from falling out and not actually pressing the rubber liners against the tube with any noticeable pressure. Also, I don't ever torque anything such as a BB or crank while it's in the stand.
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Old 05-02-07, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by DocRay
not really being discussed here (?)
Post #15.
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