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-   -   Saddle for long-haul? (https://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycling/293725-saddle-long-haul.html)

peanut_man 05-01-07 09:44 PM

Saddle for long-haul?
 
Yes, another saddle question from a noobie. And yes I did a search on the most comfortable saddle and get the usual Fizik arione, Specialized toupe, Selle Italia Flite, and Various other Selle italia recommendation. But I'm still wondering what would be most comfortable for say a century ride? These same saddle applies?

Basically I'm asking because I recently completed a metric century (my longest ride todate). My legs are abit sore and I did develop a cram toward the end but I could take it easy and it was fine. My hands are a little sore, but not bad at all. The most problem I have with is my seat. It's just sore. That seems to be more of the limiting factor than anything else for long ride.

So, looking for some recommendation. And yes, I realized every butt is different. However, I couldn't possibly really test out all the saddle selection out there. So I'm looking for some guidelines that would increase the chances that my next saddle purchase that it'll be my last. :)

Thanks!

alanbikehouston 05-01-07 09:56 PM

If you go back and read the most recent twenty (or thirty, or forty, or fifty) saddle threads, there is one clear answer: only you can figure out which saddle is most comfortable for you.

The biggest factor in saddle comfort is not the saddle. It is bar height, and the distance from the rear of the saddle to the front of the stem. If the top of your bars is level with the top of the saddle, and you have selected a bike that enables you to have a comfortable reach from the saddle to the bars, most good saddles will be comfortable after you and the saddle get used to each other.

Most roadies, impressed by the pro cyclists they see on TV, have their bars two, three, or even four inches lower than the saddle. They buy bikes with top tubes and stems that are too long, to imitate that stretched out position pro cyclists use in time trials. And, the result is crotch pain and crotch numbness, caused by rotating the pelvis forward, shifting the rider's weight from his sitbones forward onto the soft bits.

Ride for a week or two with the high part of the bars level with the saddle, and you will notice a big improvement in crotch comfort. And, surprisingly, a firm saddle, with little or no padding, is often the most comfortable on a long ride. The soft, padded type saddles seem comfortable on a short ride, but their softness allows the sitbones to sink down into the padding, putting pressure on the crotch. A firmer saddle keeps your weight on the sitbones.

Ebergram 05-01-07 10:44 PM

this saddle rocks!!
 
koobi PRS - Enduro

http://www.koobi.com/index.asp?PageA...WPROD&ProdID=3

Cypress 05-01-07 10:47 PM

I will never get tired of posting this picture

http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m...s818/ride7.jpg


Selle San Marco Aspide SE Ti, FTW.

peanut_man 05-01-07 10:49 PM


Originally Posted by alanbikehouston
Ride for a week or two with the high part of the bars level with the saddle, and you will notice a big improvement in crotch comfort. And, surprisingly, a firm saddle, with little or no padding, is often the most comfortable on a long ride. The soft, padded type saddles seem comfortable on a short ride, but their softness allows the sitbones to sink down into the padding, putting pressure on the crotch. A firmer saddle keeps your weight on the sitbones.

Yes, as stated every butt is different, but to be practical, I'm looking for some guidelines. And this is one new bit of info you have provided me as a guide line, thanks. I was looking into those softer saddle also, but this argument will help me avoid them, now that I know better.

zekebobish 05-01-07 11:08 PM

omg, thas great! deff one of those "right-click, save-as"

Mach42 05-01-07 11:11 PM


Originally Posted by Cypress
I will never get tired of posting this picture

http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m...s818/ride7.jpg


Selle San Marco Aspide SE Ti, FTW.

I take it that you've sold the "Ass Shaft." That was the funniest sig that I've seen here.

FIVE ONE SIX 05-02-07 12:31 AM


Originally Posted by peanut_man
Yes, as stated every butt is different

it has nothing to do with your butt, it has to do with your sit bones, which has been mentioned time and time again. get a saddle wider than your sit bones and you'll feel comfortable, get one that narrower than your sit bones and you'll feel discomfort, any questions?

and don't think that sit bone width and body type are related, they're not. just because someone may have a large butt, doesn't mean the bones underneath are large too...

chipcom 05-02-07 06:04 AM


Originally Posted by Cypress
I will never get tired of posting this picture
Selle San Marco Aspide SE Ti, FTW.

What is that little thing hanging under the saddle...a condom?

CastIron 05-02-07 02:27 PM

I'm re-addressing this issue as well.
My roadbike has the Arione Tri model. Previously I'd found it more comfortable than my well worn Brooks Team Pro (which I vainly refuse to put on my CF ride). A century last Sunday brought to light an oft repeated comment about the Arione: it's great for a while, but long haul it's an ass hatchet. That's an understatement. My taint actually feels bruised, so hopefully by next weekend my new saddle with a cut out will arrive. We'll see.

slowandsteady 05-02-07 03:04 PM

They really need to just install a button on my keyboard that says BROOKS.

peanut_man 05-07-07 07:30 AM


Originally Posted by FIVE ONE SIX
it has nothing to do with your butt, it has to do with your sit bones, which has been mentioned time and time again. get a saddle wider than your sit bones and you'll feel comfortable, get one that narrower than your sit bones and you'll feel discomfort, any questions?

Yup, obvious question: How do I find out which saddles are wider than my sit bones?

slowandsteady 05-07-07 07:48 AM


Originally Posted by peanut_man
Yup, obvious question: How do I find out which saddles are wider than my sit bones?


Some bike shops have the "butt-o-meter" a piece of memory foam that you sit on.

RussB 05-07-07 11:19 AM

So you looking for guidelines for the right saddle? Try this link. It's an article titled "the Quest for the Perfect Saddle". But Alanbike houston is absolutely right about harder saddles being better for long rides.

http://active.com/story.cfm?story_id...tegory=cycling

aham23 05-07-07 11:31 AM

the toupe, but each bum is different. later.


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