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Some shifting questions

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Some shifting questions

Old 08-10-07, 08:01 PM
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special
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Some shifting questions

My bike started shifting funny in the back on a long ride today and I brought it to the shop. They say it needed adjustment due to normal use, and now, I am not quite sure, but I think it takes longer to shift. What is a good number of (or percentage of) a revolution that is typical for a bike to shift down in the back? Is it normal that it takes a little for the chain the catch? Also, since the adjustment, the front gear requires two, hard, shift clicks in order to shift (ie the piece on the gears has to move twice. Is there any way I can make it so that it doesnt require huge finger strength to shift front or that I only have to click once? Its like the shifter thinks there is an extra gear in the middle there. Also, how can I make rear shifting faster? I won't be up in the direction of the bike shop for another week and a half, so I am prepared to do some maintenance if necessary. Thanks

Last update, for all who care, my last posted troubles have been resolved and I am preparing for a 40 mile ride tomorrow.
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Old 08-10-07, 08:23 PM
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What shifters do you have? When things are properly tuned, it should take half a revolution to shift in the front and even faster in the rear.
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Old 08-10-07, 08:53 PM
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Thanks, I think I have mostly tiagra products but 105 for the shifing piece in the back. Usually it only takes half a revolution but sometimes much more.
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Old 08-10-07, 09:13 PM
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in other words, can I fix it if on some gears it just clangs and scrapes for a while before shifting
the bike shop obviously is not capable
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Old 08-10-07, 09:30 PM
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Hmmm.... I have the same issue with the front derailluer. I have to shift twice to get to the smallest ring FULLY (even though it is a double). The first shift moves the chain to the smaller ring smoothly, but just barely so that I can'y use the largest gears on the rear sine it induces chain rub. Shouldn't I be able to only shift once each way?

I also am using tiagra.... Ultegra RD....
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Old 08-10-07, 10:08 PM
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Cable stretch.
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Old 08-10-07, 11:35 PM
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I thought it was cable stretch, but this has been occuring from the very beginning... I tried retightening the cables but to no avail.... Am I doing something wrong?

Thanks for any help, the problem isn't hindersome - just bothersome.
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Old 08-11-07, 05:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Bike enthusiast View Post
Shouldn't I be able to only shift once each way?
Not necessarily. I have a triple. Going from the middle ring on the front to the smallest always requires two clicks. There is even a name for the extra click, but I forget now. The idea is that one of the clicks allows some adjustment so the chain does not rub on the derailleur cage. When I got the new bike, I asked about this at the LBS. The guy who sold the bike to me said it is quite normal to have more than one click on a shift.

In regard to the OP, adjusting derailleurs is frustrating if done in piecemeal fashion. I like to start at the beginning and go through all of the steps to make sure everything is right. Release the brifters fully. Turn the barrel adjusters to their slackest position. Pull the cable by hand as tightly as possible and lock it down at each derailleur. Check the front derailleur for proper height on the seat tube and proper alignment so it is parallel with the chain. Set the low limit screws. Add tension to the cables with the adjuster barrels to remove the slack. Shift through the range of gears and set the high limit screws. Tweak as necessary with the adjuster barrels. Go for a test ride.
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Old 08-11-07, 12:04 PM
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What twobikes said, plus make sure your chain is properly lubed.
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Old 08-11-07, 12:19 PM
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A half click on the front is trim. A full click, shifts gears.
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Old 08-11-07, 10:33 PM
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Originally Posted by twobikes View Post
Not necessarily. I have a triple. Going from the middle ring on the front to the smallest always requires two clicks. There is even a name for the extra click, but I forget now. The idea is that one of the clicks allows some adjustment so the chain does not rub on the derailleur cage. When I got the new bike, I asked about this at the LBS. The guy who sold the bike to me said it is quite normal to have more than one click on a shift.

In regard to the OP, adjusting derailleurs is frustrating if done in piecemeal fashion. I like to start at the beginning and go through all of the steps to make sure everything is right. Release the brifters fully. Turn the barrel adjusters to their slackest position. Pull the cable by hand as tightly as possible and lock it down at each derailleur. Check the front derailleur for proper height on the seat tube and proper alignment so it is parallel with the chain. Set the low limit screws. Add tension to the cables with the adjuster barrels to remove the slack. Shift through the range of gears and set the high limit screws. Tweak as necessary with the adjuster barrels. Go for a test ride.
Good advice. What does "Release the brifters fully." mean?
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Old 08-11-07, 11:42 PM
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Originally Posted by RoboCheme View Post
Good advice. What does "Release the brifters fully." mean?
Shift them to their "slack" or lowest cable tension position: Rear...shift to the cog fartherst to the outside of the bike - the one with the fewest number of teeth on it. Front...shift to the inside - to the chainring with the fewest teeth on it.
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Old 08-12-07, 05:50 AM
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I might also add "brifter" is "brake" plus "shifter." Assuming you have Shimano parts, press the black lever behind the brake lever inward toward the center of the bike until there is no more clicking or clunking. Adjuster barrels are the knurled plastic knobs at the end of the shielded part of the shift cables where the open bare cable begins. They are spring loaded to disengage them and eliminate accidental adjustment. Pull against the spring tension toward the cable shielding to engage the adjusting nut and turn. When tightening, a quarter turn is a good increment. Then test the results.
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Old 08-12-07, 07:34 AM
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The other thing I always check when shifting seems a bit sluggish are the cable guides under the bottom bracket. This area catches a lot of road grime/crud (including wooly worms (very gooey) in the fall) and can keep the cable from moving smoothly. A particularly vulnerable area as it is also high friction in terms of the cable being compressed against the guides.
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