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Does a worn cassette wear a chain?

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Does a worn cassette wear a chain?

Old 11-22-07, 08:33 AM
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Does a worn cassette wear a chain?

A worn/stretched chain wears down cassettes, chainrings.

Conversely, does a worn cassette (or chainrings for that matter) wear a chain more/differently than a fresh cassette?
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Old 11-22-07, 08:36 AM
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Yes.
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Old 11-22-07, 08:38 AM
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Yes, if one part is worn, it will wear out other parts.
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Old 11-22-07, 08:53 AM
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yes.
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Old 11-22-07, 09:44 AM
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The simple answer is yes.

I can usually get two chain replacements then I need a cassette. Since it's hilly where I live, the upper cogs on the cassette tend to go first... i.e. 24,25,27 teeth. It's best not to try and "get extra miles" out of a cassette. Once it shows signs of significant wear...replace it and the chain.
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Old 11-22-07, 11:18 AM
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While a simple "YES" answer will do, it does help when one understands WHY.

A worn sprocket has rounded surfaces, so the contact area where sprocket and chain mate is reduced, thus increasing the psi on the chain roller. The more worn the sprocket, the higher the pressure, and the faster the chain as well as the sprocket will wear. Under higher loads than most bikes experience, the metal appears to "ooze" to the side under high loads. Under even higher loads, the two surfaces literally weld together and then tear apart each time they contact, resulting in flaking of the surface.

FYI, on industrial applications we use lubes rated EP (extreme pressure) to protect sprockets and gears. It's fascinating to me - coming from an industrial background - to see so little emphasis on the lubrication properties of lubes for bike chains. Clean and quiet seems tome to be what sells cyclists on chain lube.

I use "LubeCon" by Castrol on my chain. It's essentially a dry film EP lube. Not sure if you can get it at any bike shop, but we use it on chains that cost more than any bike you'll EVER see.

Last edited by SteelShepherd; 11-22-07 at 11:36 AM.
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Old 11-22-07, 11:31 AM
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No. The worn sprocket will not mate properly with a new chain and it will skip, but I don't think it will make the chain wear out any sooner.
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Old 11-22-07, 11:33 AM
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Originally Posted by San Rensho
No. The worn sprocket will not mate properly with a new chain and it will skip, but I don't think it will make the chain wear out any sooner.
It will. The teeth of the sprocket wont match hence the edges of the sprocket contacts with the chain; causing wear.
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Old 11-22-07, 11:39 AM
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Originally Posted by corny
It will. The teeth of the sprocket wont match hence the edges of the sprocket contacts with the chain; causing wear.
Well, really what it will do is stretch the chain out. You should use a chain stretch checker. If your chain is stretched, it will wear your sprocket. At that point you have to change your whole drivetrain.
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Old 11-22-07, 05:25 PM
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Not that it matters, but chains don't actually "stretch." The pins and bushings wear and the chain is effectively longer when under tension. While its technically possible that the links themselves can be loaded just enough that the steel experiences "plastic deformation" and actually stretches without breaking, I wouldn't count on it.

Regardless, the answer to the first question is still a simple "YES", worn sprockets make a chain wear out faster.

Maybe we even have an accountant here that can calculate at what point in the life of a cassette it pays for itself to replace an expensive cassette by reducing the rate of wear and extending the life of a relatively inexpensive chain. You'll probably be embarrassed by the appearance of the old cassette before you get to that point.
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Old 11-22-07, 11:42 PM
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Originally Posted by SteelShepherd
I use "LubeCon" by Castrol on my chain. It's essentially a dry film EP lube. Not sure if you can get it at any bike shop, but we use it on chains that cost more than any bike you'll EVER see.
Can we get a link or something. That's pretty fascinating to me because you really only hear about lube that's marketed specifically as bike chain lube. Any more info would be great, because I'm really trying to make my drivetrain last as long as possible. Thanks.
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Old 11-23-07, 12:07 AM
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Originally Posted by ChunkyB
Can we get a link or something. That's pretty fascinating to me because you really only hear about lube that's marketed specifically as bike chain lube. Any more info would be great, because I'm really trying to make my drivetrain last as long as possible. Thanks.
Hey Chunky,hows it going?
Fix that sore "package" problem from your last thread?

A chain and sprocket specific spray lube can be purchased at Home Dopey.
Chain+sprocket lube with Moly(abr.)
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Old 11-23-07, 12:44 AM
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see, if you just said "yes" it means a whole lot less typing and less justification. :grin:
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Old 11-23-07, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by spry
Fix that sore "package" problem from your last thread?

A chain and sprocket specific spray lube can be purchased at Home Dopey.
Chain+sprocket lube with Moly(abr.)
Haha. Yeah, got all the feeling back in all 21 fingers and toes. Honestly though,I have a pretty sweet saddle, so I haven't had any problems. I get more numbness from the ruptured disk in my back. Thanks for the concern.

Thanks for the info. I don't know why that is so interesting to me, but I had just never heard of using anything other than "bike chain lube" on my chain, except the LBS adamantly telling me not to use WD-40.
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Old 11-23-07, 10:59 AM
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So, how do I tell if a cassette is worn? I can use a gauge on the chain, but what about the cogs?
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Old 11-23-07, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by San Rensho
No. The worn sprocket will not mate properly with a new chain and it will skip, but I don't think it will make the chain wear out any sooner.
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Old 11-23-07, 01:07 PM
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Originally Posted by San Rensho
No. The worn sprocket will not mate properly with a new chain and it will skip, but I don't think it will make the chain wear out any sooner.
I think I'm with you here. A worn chain will cause a new cassette to wear faster, but the opposite combination won't. The reason is that, with a worn chain, the roller to roller pitch gets longer, making it so it won't mesh properly with the new cog, thus loading each cog tooth more because the other teeth the chain is wrapped around are not contacting the chain fully due to the pitch of the chain rollers being greater than half an inch.

A worn cog, on the other hand, has teeth of the wrong profile due to wear, but the pitch of the teeth is still exactly half an inch because the tooth pitch is set by the diameter of the cog. To increase the pitch of the cog teeth, you'd have to make the diameter of the cog bigger, which obviously doesn't happen.

Thus, a new chain will still mesh properly with a worn cog, which is why you can get away with only replacing the chain if the chain hasn't stretched too far. However, that said, the shape of the worn cog teeth might not be conductive to carrying the load from the chain, causing the chain to skip. And even if the chain didn't skip, it won't shift as well compared to a new cogset.
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Old 11-23-07, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by cycle17
The simple answer is yes.

I can usually get two chain replacements then I need a cassette. Since it's hilly where I live, the upper cogs on the cassette tend to go first... i.e. 24,25,27 teeth. It's best not to try and "get extra miles" out of a cassette. Once it shows signs of significant wear...replace it and the chain.
On the cassette- Fit a new chain on a worn cassette and you will get the chain skipping. That is why I have a spare chain- run in of course- for the long Offroad rides that I do instead of a new chain.

A worn cassette will not wear out a chain. But if the Cassette is so badly worn a new chain will skip.
I look at the view that even if a cassette is worn- If the chain runs OK- Then a cassette change is due soon.
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