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How much bike does a beginner need?

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How much bike does a beginner need?

Old 01-09-08, 05:56 PM
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How much bike does a beginner need?

I have been chekcing out all the major bike manufacturer's websites and I am amazed at the options available. Specialized, Jamis, Trek, CDale, etc.. It seems that for just "a little bit more cash" you can get a little better bike. At what point is it beyond the common recreational cyclist to upgrade? What I mean is this: I want to ride a road bike for an hour or two a few days a week, maybe a longer ride on weekends, and maybe throw in a MS 150 once or twice a year. It seems like there's a bunch of decent bikes for around $800 or so. But take the Allez for example: do I spend up a few hundred to go from sora to tiagra? Do I then try to get to the 105 level? Do I want 700 x 23 or is 25 more practical for a fitness ride? Does it really matter to me if I don't spend another $400 to get carbon this and that if I never plan on racing? I just want to go in and buy a bike just above my skill level so i won't quickly outgrow it. Is that the second grade up from entry level?
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Old 01-09-08, 06:05 PM
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Keep in mind that not only will the better components work better, they'll last long also. Better components are more of an investment than a one time cost in my opinion. If you have the money I would upgrade past sora. 105 is a good transitional group between ultegra/dura ace and the cheaper groups as far as price vs quality goes, but tiagra is probably worth the upgrade. The 700x25 tires are better for recreation in my opinion, they'll give a softer ride. Carbon this and that (seatpost, stem, handlebars etc.) aren't necessary, and the last thing you should be doing on a bike is sacrificing components for carbon bottle cages and carbon handlebars and things like that when money is an issue.
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Old 01-09-08, 06:09 PM
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Originally Posted by mato_h2h
I have been chekcing out all the major bike manufacturer's websites and I am amazed at the options available. Specialized, Jamis, Trek, CDale, etc.. It seems that for just "a little bit more cash" you can get a little better bike. At what point is it beyond the common recreational cyclist to upgrade? What I mean is this: I want to ride a road bike for an hour or two a few days a week, maybe a longer ride on weekends, and maybe throw in a MS 150 once or twice a year. It seems like there's a bunch of decent bikes for around $800 or so. But take the Allez for example: do I spend up a few hundred to go from sora to tiagra? Do I then try to get to the 105 level? Do I want 700 x 23 or is 25 more practical for a fitness ride? Does it really matter to me if I don't spend another $400 to get carbon this and that if I never plan on racing? I just want to go in and buy a bike just above my skill level so i won't quickly outgrow it. Is that the second grade up from entry level?
Pick whatever major bike company you like. I personally think you should try to get tiagra instead of sora. 105 and higher is not necesary unless you have the money. An aluminum frame is all you need. Carbon fiber or an aluminum carbon fiber mix is unnecesary. You can get steel to although barely anyone offers it. You really have tons of options in the $750 range. As far as tires, 700x25 tires are more all around and 700x23 are more "racing".

I think something that would be perfect for you would be an aluminum frame, carbon fiber fork, tiagra group, and whatever tires it comes with. You can always switch back and forth.
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Old 01-09-08, 06:09 PM
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The absolute biggest factor in buying a new bike is the fit. A $400 internet bike that fits you right will get WAY more miles than a boutique bike that doesn't fit.

Aside from that, the bottom line is what can you afford. I was strapped for a cash a couple years ago, but wanted to ride. I got a cheap bike and set it up to fit and have been happy. I am saving up for a nicer bike and look forward to that day. But I'm so glad I got at least something and have had a blast riding. If this is you, buy cheap and get it set up right. Ride it and be happy. If you have the money and it's not fiscally irresponsible, buy as nice of a bike as you can afford. You'll be happier in the end. If it compromises your financial situation, DON'T do it.
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Old 01-09-08, 06:11 PM
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That's true, don't start off too big because upgrading is tons of fun once you get into the sport
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Old 01-09-08, 06:22 PM
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wow 800 only gets Soras these days. If thats the case, SAVE more get at least 105's or Ultegra for about 12-1400. Skip the Sora's all together, I'd rather settle for 105's then Tiaga stuff.

Tiagra equip'd cheap
https://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...adbike+07.aspx

105 equip'd

https://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...d+Bike+07.aspx

https://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...05+Kit+07.aspx
(I have the Nirone w/ Ultregra/105 and love it)

https://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...d+07+Demo.aspx

then there is always biek direct.....
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Old 01-09-08, 06:23 PM
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I would also go with a compact double. (oh the controversies)
Most bikes you see on sale have gearing that's too high for beginners. By going with a compact it lowers the gear ratio, thus allowing you to use your gears more.
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Old 01-09-08, 06:30 PM
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I was in your EXACT situation about a month ago. I was also a newbie rider looking for a first road bike...the only difference being that I saw a possibility of some races in my future (probably duathlons though, so it wouldn't be full riding). I ended up getting a Specialized Ruby Elite. I had looked at a few bikes, including a Specialized Allez Elite, a Trek 2.1 WSD, a Specialized Roubaix, and a Cannondale Synapse. The Allez ended up fitting me the best, but then the guy at the shop suggested a Ruby (Specialized's women's specific model). It fit me just as well as the Allez, and he was able to convince me that it was "a lot more bike for a little more money." I probably didn't need QUITE that much bike, but the ride is fantastic and I have no complaints. Would I have been just as happy with an Allez? Probably. But do I have any regrets? Hell no! Buy as much as you can afford (within reason). It's more economical to buy up front than to try to upgrade. Also, keep in mind that you won't just be buying a bike...you'll need pedals, shoes, a helmet, bottle cages, etc to go along with it.

Also, be sure to talk to the people at the store. They'll probably be willing to work with you. When I bought my bike, they converted it to a compact double (since they only had triples in stock) and swapped in a longer stem.
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Old 01-09-08, 06:55 PM
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Wow!! That Bianchi from Jenson's looks schweet!! This may be a dumb question but the jenson's website didn't spell this out clearly. How are these bikes shipped? Are they rideable right out of the box? Is some basic wrenching needed? Or will I need to sheepishly drag the pieces into my LBS after I choose to go the online order route?

On the other hand, my local LBS just became a "specialized shop" or something like that. They have a swet allez in the window that's calling my name. The thought of buying local has it's appeal too. But that Celeste color is calling to me.........hmmmmmmmmmmmmm.........
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Old 01-09-08, 07:00 PM
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I know people who happily do 100 mile rides on entry-level road bikes like the Trek 1000 or Giant OCR3. Don't fall for the trick where some companies put slightly better components on low end frames and jack up the price. If the entry-level bike is too cheap for you, look for a bike with a better frame as well as better components. A better frame will be lightweight and more responsive, as well as more compliant and less harsh.

Remember that the most important feature of any bike is how well it fits you. Look for a bike with a whole geometry that matches your fitness level and body dimensions. Don't just look at seat tube length.
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Old 01-09-08, 07:00 PM
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Originally Posted by mato_h2h
Wow!! That Bianchi from Jenson's looks schweet!! This may be a dumb question but the jenson's website didn't spell this out clearly. How are these bikes shipped? Are they rideable right out of the box? Is some basic wrenching needed? Or will I need to sheepishly drag the pieces into my LBS after I choose to go the online order route?

On the other hand, my local LBS just became a "specialized shop" or something like that. They have a swet allez in the window that's calling my name. The thought of buying local has it's appeal too. But that Celeste color is calling to me.........hmmmmmmmmmmmmm.........
I think over 900, shipping is free and the bike is pretty much put together. I was going to buy a LHT off of them, but changed my mind and got the Roubaix instead.
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Old 01-09-08, 07:42 PM
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About 18 lbs of it.
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Old 01-09-08, 08:04 PM
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Originally Posted by mato_h2h
Wow!! That Bianchi from Jenson's looks schweet!! This may be a dumb question but the jenson's website didn't spell this out clearly. How are these bikes shipped? Are they rideable right out of the box? Is some basic wrenching needed? Or will I need to sheepishly drag the pieces into my LBS after I choose to go the online order route?

On the other hand, my local LBS just became a "specialized shop" or something like that. They have a swet allez in the window that's calling my name. The thought of buying local has it's appeal too. But that Celeste color is calling to me.........hmmmmmmmmmmmmm.........
it's prettty much put together, align the stem and mount the wheels. The Nirone is SWEET, I love mine. It handles very nice on the decents and comfy on the long rides. I paid 1200 for mine with the Ultregra/105 mix, some different parts, same wheel and frame as Jenson's. The grey is pretty slick color too. The thing I like about the celeste bike, I stand out in the group
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Old 01-09-08, 08:21 PM
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I started out with a $400 hybrid 3 years ago and did multiple centuries and charity rides on it. At the end of last season, I dropped a little over $3k on a full carbon "almost top level" bike. The jump I made was pretty staggering. Had I been on a $800 road bike originally, the jump would have been merely "significant".

Like anything else, the bigger jumps seem to happen at the lower end. There will be a bigger difference between an $800 bike and a $1000 bike than there is between a $4,000 bike and a $5,000 bike. As you move up the ladder, you hit a point of diminishing returns.

My advice? Assess how much you can afford to spend. In the $1,000 range you can get some really good bikes, probably aluminum frame (maybe carbon fork or seat stays) with 105 level components. You may never need "more" bike. My guess is that below that you might want to upgrade more quickly. Also keep in mind that if you get a decent frame with "ok" components, you can upgrade over time. One of the BIGGEST factors is trying to gauge how committed you are to the sport (spending a ton a bike that you don't use after the first month is a big waste of money).

Find a good LBS, and do your research before you shop. A good shop will fit you well and match your budget and sizing to a good bike. They'll also be good to work with when it comes time for service and maintenance.

I bought a fairly cheap bike and rode the hell out of it before I took a bigger plunge. This not only helped me decide how committed I was to riding, but also allowed me to get an idea of what I really wanted.
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Old 01-09-08, 08:49 PM
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If this is your first bike, I'd suggest buying local. It's hard to know how something will fit you. For example, the Trek I was on didn't feel right at all. I'd never have known that had I only looked online. Plus, your LBS will spend a while with you making little adjustments. Changing the seat height, moving the saddle position, finding a stem that fits, and so on. They might even be willing to swap out handlebars or a saddle, or at least give you a good discount on other parts. And a lot of shops will also swap out components for nicer components and just upcharge the difference.
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Old 01-09-08, 08:52 PM
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Originally Posted by mato_h2h
I have been chekcing out all the major bike manufacturer's websites and I am amazed at the options available. Specialized, Jamis, Trek, CDale, etc.. It seems that for just "a little bit more cash" you can get a little better bike. At what point is it beyond the common recreational cyclist to upgrade? What I mean is this: I want to ride a road bike for an hour or two a few days a week, maybe a longer ride on weekends, and maybe throw in a MS 150 once or twice a year. It seems like there's a bunch of decent bikes for around $800 or so. But take the Allez for example: do I spend up a few hundred to go from sora to tiagra? Do I then try to get to the 105 level? Do I want 700 x 23 or is 25 more practical for a fitness ride? Does it really matter to me if I don't spend another $400 to get carbon this and that if I never plan on racing? I just want to go in and buy a bike just above my skill level so i won't quickly outgrow it. Is that the second grade up from entry level?
i say start with a used or older-model steel road bike ($400-600), ride it into the ground (take care of it, but push the thing as hard as it'll go, and push yourself even harder). spending less would let you save some dough for accessories, like booties & gloves.

after a few months you'll know exactly what you don't like about the bike, if anything. maybe the bottom bracket will be squishy (will give) when climbing/sprinting, maybe it's not the lightest bike, but just make sure it fits (test ride it first)!

then when you're ready to upgrade, go out and buy that $1.5k+ bike that's got it all (or just get new wheels/fork/etc).

(then turn the older bike into a fixie, just for fun & to get stronger)
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Old 01-09-08, 08:52 PM
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I'd say go with atleast a tiagra setup. Look around for shops trying to sell models 1+ years old, that'll make the price better.

In my opinion, fuji, jamis, and giant are three manufacturers that have the best bang for the buck in their entry level models.
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Old 01-09-08, 08:52 PM
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The "entry level" Sora road bikes from the best suppliers: Trek, Specialized, Giant, KHS, etc., are amazingly good bikes IF (and ONLY if) they are purchased from first rate bike shops that take the time to properly fit the owners, and carefully assemble and tune the bikes.

If the owners decide to ride "seriously", they could upgrade the wheels and tires, and have a bike that compares very well in weight and performance to bikes that were winning the Tour de France back in the '80's.

To get a SIGNIFICANT upgrade in performance that anyone could clearly notice, you need to go up to at least the 105 level, and spend $1,200 to $1,400 instead of just $700 or $800.

And, a $700 entry level bike from a top dealer is going to deliver about 90% of the performance of that $1,400 bike, at just half the price.
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Old 01-09-08, 08:57 PM
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If you're not 100% sure about fit, buy local. Ignoring your budget, get 105's - a good starting point that will last you many years. If you can afford it, I suggest carbon over aluminum - more comfortable ride generally speaking. Look for 07 and 06 models. If the bike you like doesn't come in compact, ask the bike shop to change to compact - usually you won't get charged. To get a good, mid-level bike, expect to spend $1.5k.
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Old 01-09-08, 09:09 PM
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Why not get a bike with a triple? I know that triples have their downsides including weight and shifting performance but I don't think a triple is something for a beginner to overlook- you get a granny gear to help you not bust a pair of knees that aren't used to cycling, let alone cycling up hills, and you get a close-ratioed cassette. It's not all bad.

And I second others vote for a 105 gruppo. I'm still a newb but my 105 bike feels smooth to me and the Tiagra bikes I test rode had a comparatively ratchety feel. If the OP can test ride Tiagra and 105 bikes back-to-back, that would be ideal. Scientific, almost .
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Old 01-09-08, 09:24 PM
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$1100 is a good beginners budget; enough to avoid crap and not too much crap.
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Old 01-09-08, 09:30 PM
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i used to say an aluminum frame with carbon fork and 105 was all anyone really NEEDS....but Tiagra has gotten so good it's plenty fine.
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Old 01-09-08, 10:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Surferbruce
i used to say an aluminum frame with carbon fork and 105 was all anyone really NEEDS....but Tiagra has gotten so good it's plenty fine.
I wouldn't be surprised to discover new Tiagra is basically updated 9s 105.
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Old 01-09-08, 11:21 PM
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i'd have to say get atleast 105. my allez with sora/tiagra mix just drives me nuts, i always have to fiddle with it to keep it shifting properly. this and my horrible spending problem will probably cause the allez to be replaced pretty soon.
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Old 01-09-08, 11:32 PM
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Maybe just buy the most bike you can afford, with all the fixings you want (or like) .. that is if you have the money now. $1500 will get you on a Rolls Royce of a starter .. go from there. Yes, people will tell you all day that it's about the rider. But there is a reason the upgrade market is as big as it is: people love nice bike shtuff. And will pay top dollar to get it;

Start big.

(just another opinion)
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