Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Tubular vs. Clincher

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Tubular vs. Clincher

Old 10-16-01, 07:53 AM
  #1  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Tubular vs. Clincher

I am looking at a new pair of wheels and can not decide whether to buy the tubular or the clincher version. Any thoughts?
moller is offline  
Old 10-16-01, 08:16 AM
  #2  
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: upstate New York
Posts: 1,688
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
here we go again!

Tubulars:
Always lighter than clinchers (both wheels and tyres)
Always ride better
Has greater range of pressures available
Costs more
Hassle to mount
Usually flat less frequent, but are a @^#$%ing pain in the @r$e to fix
Quicker to change on the road, but requires a complete spare unit.

Clinchers:
Less mess, quicker to do a permanent mount
Can be mounted even in the pouring rain
costs less, and greater choice of tyres
rides harsher
weighs more
can't take higher/lower pressure
pinch-flats easily
__________________
Je vais à vélo, donc je suis!
D*Alex is offline  
Old 10-16-01, 08:32 AM
  #3  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
D*Alex, getting more specific which would you go with?

Bike: Trek 5200
Rider Weight: Woman, 5'10, 140lbs, 3 years riding
Race: 20 to 50 mile triathlon bike courses in mixed terrain
Possible Wheels: Zipp 404 or Mavic Cosmic

Thanks
moller is offline  
Old 10-16-01, 10:17 AM
  #4  
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: upstate New York
Posts: 1,688
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I would use tubulars. I like them. i think that the better ride and lighter weight is worth it. I also don't need to count on them asfor daily use.
The deciding factor should be this: Are you willing to put up with the hassles of tubulars, and are you physically capable of mounting them yourself?
Only you have the answer to these questions.

As far as the wheels go, I'm not a fan of botique wheels. I'd rather build a set, or have one professionally built.
__________________
Je vais à vélo, donc je suis!
D*Alex is offline  
Old 10-16-01, 11:03 AM
  #5  
SLJ 6/8/65-5/2/07
 
Walter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: SE Florida, USA aka the Treasure Coast
Posts: 5,399
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 19 Times in 6 Posts
My retro ride (mid-80s Basso) has a set of clinchers and a set of sew-up wheels. Wheels themselves are comparable quality and I do like the ride of the sew-ups. I have to admit though that the clinchers spend alot more time on the bike than the tubulars.

__________________
“Life is not one damned thing after another. Life is one damned thing over and over.”
Edna St. Vincent Millay
Walter is offline  
Old 10-16-01, 11:07 AM
  #6  
human
 
velocipedio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: living in the moment
Posts: 3,562

Bikes: 2005 Litespeed Teramo, 2000 Marinoni Leggero, 2001 Kona Major Jake (with Campy Centaur), 1997 Specialized S-Works M2, 1992 Specialized Rockhopper

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Truth is that some of the better clinchers [Conti GP300s, Vredestein Fortezza Tri-Comps] ride almost as well -- maybe even better -- than tubulars. IMO, the only real advantage to tubulars these days is weight. If you race crits or have a support car, then they're great; if you don't, clinchers are somewhat easier.
__________________
when walking, just walk. when sitting, just sit. when riding, just ride. above all, don't wobble.

The Irregular Cycling Club of Montreal
Cycling irregularly since 2002
velocipedio is offline  
Old 10-16-01, 12:16 PM
  #7  
where's the summer!?
 
cabledonut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Lancashire, England.
Posts: 135
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
clinchers moller, without a doubt. i'd recommend michelin 'axial pro' clinchers. although michelin are phasing out the axial pro now anyway for a new clincher called the 'pro light' and 'pro race' (two models of the same clincher). available here in the uk from around january. the new tyre will have a good tpi (thread per square inch) of 127, ie, more puncture proof due to density of the nylon polyamide casing, as well as thinner side walls for a more plush, smoother ride. they've improved the rubber too making them more grippy, as if they needed improving on that score already!? more and more pro riders and teams use clinchers now than tubs, much to the delight of the mechanics! they're easy to use, if you become good at replacing a tube, it can be done in under a minute using a CO2 cartridge. as for lightness comparison, yes a good tub will be lighter but only by a few grams, which doesn't make up for their awkwardness of application and removal, not to mention their repairal. don't even mention tub glue! for time trialling go for a 700 x 20 mm tyre, for road racing go for a 700 x 23 mm. i would go so far as to say tubs will be a thing of the past the way things are going.

cabledonut.

Last edited by cabledonut; 10-16-01 at 12:19 PM.
cabledonut is offline  
Old 10-16-01, 12:50 PM
  #8  
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: upstate New York
Posts: 1,688
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
FWIW, my Tufo belts are 305 tpi, which is probably why they never flat. There certainly are a lot of garbage tubulars out there (which I wouldn't buy for a garden cart), but with 95% of the peloton in the Tour de France riding tubulars, I doubt they are going to become a thing of the past.
People said that tubulars were a thing of the past in the 30's, in the 60's, in the 90's, and yet they are still around, even after at least 125 years!
__________________
Je vais à vélo, donc je suis!
D*Alex is offline  
Old 10-20-01, 10:25 AM
  #9  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Tampa
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
As a former pro rider using tubulars in 70', it was fine, but I find present clinchers technology are more advanced. My choice Michelin Axilal Pro Light, sure they don't last too long but o boy they have good rolling and grip. And I don't have mechanic working on my bike anymore ither.
champion is offline  
Old 12-16-01, 08:46 AM
  #10  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I ride tubulars on the track (and for flat road time trials) and state of the art clinchers on the road. Upshot: clinchers clinchers, clinchers. The Conti Gran Prix supersonics at 150 psi "hum" and handle like (better than) the best Conti tubulars. And with latex tubes they weigh less! And they're rounder. I've glued on maybe 50 tubulars and never gotten them perfectly round and true. And the gluey mess sucks. And who wants to blow out a $70 tire when they could replace a $10 tube? Downside: the supersonics don't last--I weigh 180 lbs and the most I can expect from a rear supersonic is @ 2000 miles. So I ride a Gran Prix 3000 on the back, unless it's a hill climb TT or hilly stage of a stage race in which case I'll use a supersonic rear and a Veloflex Record (130 grams) on the front. And there's another plus for clinchers--it's easy to change out your tires to suit the kind of riding you're doing--with tubulars they're such a pain to change that the tires generally stay on there until they crap out.

To off set the high cost of the tires I ride during the season--in the off season for high mile weeks I ride $7 tires from WalMart. Really. 26mm tires inflated to 90 psi. They're comfortable, durable (as long as you never over-inflate), cheap--and when you switch them out with supersonics you feel, well, supersonic.
erblackiv is offline  
Old 12-16-01, 09:14 AM
  #11  
human
 
velocipedio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: living in the moment
Posts: 3,562

Bikes: 2005 Litespeed Teramo, 2000 Marinoni Leggero, 2001 Kona Major Jake (with Campy Centaur), 1997 Specialized S-Works M2, 1992 Specialized Rockhopper

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Another thing about tubulars... Say you're out on a 180 km ride and you shred your tire. Even if you have no trouble gluing and setting the new tire, you have to be VERY careful on the way back while the glue sets. No quick turns, and take it easy on the climbs. Doable, but no fun... and IMO, the potential advantages of tubulars aren't worth it.
__________________
when walking, just walk. when sitting, just sit. when riding, just ride. above all, don't wobble.

The Irregular Cycling Club of Montreal
Cycling irregularly since 2002
velocipedio is offline  
Old 12-16-01, 10:56 AM
  #12  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
True, but you've touched on the one reason that tubulars will always be around. And it isn't because they're still ridden in the Tour de France. Triathalons. Where the clock is ticking while you're replacing your flat. There's nothing faster than ripping off a dead tubular and popping on a (pre-stretched, pre-glued) spare and filling it with a co2 cartridge. And you don't have ride that carefully (I've ridden over 50 miles on a dry tubuar) maybe just on the descents and sharps turns.

Not really a defense of tubulars, just saying let the tri-geeks have them.
erblackiv is offline  
Old 12-16-01, 11:19 AM
  #13  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Tampa
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally posted by erblackiv
Where the clock is ticking while you're replacing your flat.
Since when you change tire during the race? Only when you are so behind all service vehicle....
champion is offline  
Old 12-16-01, 11:24 AM
  #14  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Uh, did you miss the word triathalon? Helps if you read the whole post. That's the way it's done in that sport. Whether your first or last. No support vehicles.
erblackiv is offline  
Old 12-16-01, 03:10 PM
  #15  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Tampa
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Ok, so what do you do when you have more then one flat? How many tubulars you cary with you? I have one tube and patch kit, maybe is taking longer but I can finish the race....
champion is offline  
Old 12-16-01, 04:13 PM
  #16  
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: upstate New York
Posts: 1,688
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If you pre-glue your spares, you won't have to worry about a spare rolling off.
For long rides, I often carry 2 spares (altough I have never needed it), the second spare a lightweight clement latex-tubed thing I bought cheap somewhere. I used to carry a tubular patch kit, too, but my Tufo's won't ever need that, so I stopped.
If you are really worried about spare adhesion, my local Pep-boys store has small tubes of Fastack available-that will set up firm in about 1 hour. I wouldn't use fastack as a general glue, but it would be OK for a spare.
__________________
Je vais à vélo, donc je suis!
D*Alex is offline  
Old 12-16-01, 06:05 PM
  #17  
RAGBRAI. Need I say more?
 
Steele-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: West Branch, Iowa USA
Posts: 868

Bikes: 1998 Mongoose NX7.1, 2008 Kona Jake, GT singlespeed (year unknown).

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
After reading all of the previous posts, I have one question floating through my head: What exactly does it mean for a tire to be a tubular or a clincher?
Steele-Bike is offline  
Old 12-17-01, 12:39 PM
  #18  
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: upstate New York
Posts: 1,688
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
From Sheldon's glossary:
"Tubular
A type of tire mainly used for racing. A tubular tire has no beads; instead, the two edges of the carcass are sewn together (hence the term "sew-up") with the inner tube inside. Tubulars fit only on special rims, where they are held on by cement.
Tubulars use Presta valves. You should never use valve caps or other screwed-on valve accessories with tubulars.

Most people find expensive tubulars too expensive for recreational riding...but cheap tubulars are distinctly inferior to good clinchers, particularly in that they tend to be lumpy and crooked.

Comparing high-quality tubulars with clinchers, including the rims, tubes, etc, tubulars save about 50 grams per wheel...but your bike winds up heavier, because you really need to carry a complete spare tubular, as opposed to a tube and/or a patch kit. This doesn't apply if the team car is carrying spare wheels/bikes for you.

If you don't glue your tubulars on properly, they can roll off, causing you to crash.

Tubulars are fairly immune to "snake-bite" rim cuts, and may offer slightly better "suspension" action than comparable clinchers. "
__________________
Je vais à vélo, donc je suis!
D*Alex is offline  
Old 12-17-01, 01:54 PM
  #19  
RAGBRAI. Need I say more?
 
Steele-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: West Branch, Iowa USA
Posts: 868

Bikes: 1998 Mongoose NX7.1, 2008 Kona Jake, GT singlespeed (year unknown).

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thank you.
Steele-Bike is offline  
Old 12-20-01, 04:02 PM
  #20  
riding a Pinarello Prince
 
orguasch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Downtown Toronto,Canada
Posts: 2,409

Bikes: Pinarello, Prince and an FP5

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My vote would be for clincehr tires, I don't know the reason but I find it very convinience when you have flat you can fix it right on the road, I presently using a Michellin Axial pro 700 x 20 mounted on a Mavic Cosmic Elite....
__________________
"Racso", the well oiled machine;)
orguasch is offline  
Old 12-21-01, 02:58 PM
  #21  
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: upstate New York
Posts: 1,688
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Gee, whenever I've had a flat on the road with a tubular, I've always fixed it without any problem.
__________________
Je vais à vélo, donc je suis!
D*Alex is offline  
Old 10-28-10, 10:12 AM
  #22  
pan y agua
 
merlinextraligh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Jacksonville
Posts: 31,262

Bikes: Willier Zero 7; Merlin Extralight; Calfee Dragonfly tandem, Calfee Adventure tandem; Cervelo P2; Motebecane Ti Fly 29er; Motebecanne Phantom Cross; Schwinn Paramount Track bike

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1419 Post(s)
Liked 680 Times in 347 Posts
So have we been able to reach a consensus yet?
__________________
You could fall off a cliff and die.
You could get lost and die.
You could hit a tree and die.
OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.
merlinextraligh is offline  
Old 10-28-10, 10:23 AM
  #23  
on a road near you...
 
cmolway's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Metro Boston, MA
Posts: 460
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You win the "thread resurrection" award of the day! Do think that after 9 years, that this thread is relevant anymore?
cmolway is offline  
Old 10-28-10, 10:25 AM
  #24  
Super Moderator
 
Homebrew01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ffld Cnty Connecticut
Posts: 21,841

Bikes: Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1173 Post(s)
Liked 917 Times in 605 Posts
Originally Posted by cmolway
You win the "thread resurrection" award of the day! Do think that after 9 years, that this thread is relevant anymore?
You win the "didn't get the joke" award of the day.
__________________
Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike.

FYI: https://www.bikeforums.net/forum-sugg...ad-please.html
Homebrew01 is offline  
Old 10-28-10, 10:27 AM
  #25  
Senior Member
 
VA_Esquire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Hampton, VA
Posts: 2,364
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
its only the first page. addiction is trying to reach a consensus and it is on page 1811
VA_Esquire is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Teamprovicycle
General Cycling Discussion
60
04-10-18 04:38 AM
happybday29475
"The 33"-Road Bike Racing
34
04-27-14 02:52 PM
youcoming
Road Cycling
26
03-03-12 07:17 AM
spikeimc2001
Bicycle Mechanics
10
10-28-10 11:45 AM
Zaphod Beeblebrox
Classic & Vintage
79
10-07-10 08:02 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.