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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

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Old 11-12-03, 09:54 PM   #1
chaztrip
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Clincher? Tubular?

Uggg being newer to this.. I am going to Jinx my self here and state that I have not had a flat yet...

but I was wanting to race next season and what tires will be the best for all around racing? Crit TT road?

and what is the big Diff between the 2?

I assume that I have a Clincher since I dont have a pre glued tube ?


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Old 11-12-03, 10:14 PM   #2
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You would know if you had a tubular

A tubular has a tube sewed into the tire basicaly. A tubular can give you a slightly lighter wheel, higher air pressure and a better ride. So it might shave a few seconds off you're time, you could get a set of tubular wheels and keep you're current ones for training.
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Old 11-17-03, 01:40 PM   #3
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I've wondered about this also. So clincher tires are the "normal" ones with a seperate tire and tube?
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Old 11-17-03, 02:11 PM   #4
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You got it Aero Dog!
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Old 11-17-03, 08:01 PM   #5
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Although there is one tubular (Tufo) which adapts to a clincher rim, all others
require a tubular wheel set. Tubulars have a 'golden wheel' cachet, an ineffable lightness and handling, they are a PITA to deal with. They are glued
on and take a little while to fully attach and cure, depending on the glue. They are marginal where a lot of braking will occur as demonstrated by Beloki
in last summer's TdF. If the rim gets hot, the glue softens and the tire can
roll off. Occasionally it will roll off anyway, not common but common enough.
If you flat, they are not field repairable, you carry a complete new tire with you
and mount it on the hopefully still tacky rim, or carry some glue with you and
spread it on the tire and mount, then hope the tire doesn't roll off til you get
home. Repair at home is dicey, doable but dicey. I used to do it in the '70's
but if you can't find the hole in the tread where the leak occurs it can be
anybodies guess where the hole is. In this day and age of throwaway electronics and STI shifters, tubulars are almost one use and throwaway. It
can take 1-2hrs to take down the tube, find and repair the leak and sew it
back up. Others will sing praises, they are nice but mainly if you have a team mechanic. Steve
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Old 11-17-03, 08:30 PM   #6
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sch is right, they are sweet, but they are a pain in the ass. As far as the glue being a chore, Tufo has come out with some double sided adhesive tape that apparently is quite good. If you have never used Tubulars before, and If you are not racing for regional/state/national titles etc. I would reccommend lightweight clinchers. It may not be worth the hassle if you're new to it.

There are a couple of places that will repair your tubulars for $15.00 a piece.

But.....If you've got the time, and the disposable income, buy a set of wheels and tires and give 'em a shot. You will see why Pro teams who are sponsored by tire manufactures that don't make a tubular, ride blacked out re-badged tubulars. You will also see why they have a team of mechanics.
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Old 11-17-03, 09:01 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sch
They are marginal where a lot of braking will occur as demonstrated by Beloki in last summer's TdF.
Explain to me how a clincher is any better at braking since all
braking occurs on the wheel itself and not the tire.

The real cause of Beloki's problems at TdF this year wasn't rolling a
tire, but the hot melting asphalt. If he had slid the same way on a
clincher it too would have seperated itself from the rim.
He was already in over his head, and out of control when his
tire rolled.

By the way, while I will concede that field repairs on a tubular are a
pain, have you EVER seen anyone roll a tubular? I find that most people
who criticize tubulars have never actually ridden them.

Marty
(who carries a velox repair kit)
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Old 11-17-03, 09:10 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sch
They are marginal where a lot of braking will occur as demonstrated by Beloki
in last summer's TdF
Beloki crashed not because the glue melted but simply because he hit some wet tar, slid, over-compensated and went down. Would have happened with clinchers.

Oops. Sorry Lotek. Didn't see your post.

Anyway, riding on sew ups is like going from a station wagon to a Porsche. There's that much of a difference.
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Old 11-17-03, 09:27 PM   #9
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I remember back in the late eighties, A guy in the TDF rolled his tubular, He kept it up though. I remember seeing him rolling over the line behind the group with the tire half off. It never deflated, and he never crashed.

Lucky bastard.
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Old 11-18-03, 08:48 AM   #10
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as a person wh prefers tubulars over clinchers, I must admit that there are time I prefer to be riding one of my clincher bikes rather than deal with tubular tire nuisances. If it's raining, even the best roadside repair (pre-glued spare, for me) would cause me to worry about how good the adhesion to the rim actually is.

I've rode thousands of miles on all kiinds of tubulars, using all kinds of glues. I've never rolled a tubular off, even when riding with fresh, soft glue. I've never seen anybody do this, either. Of course, I keep in mind the limitations of a fresh tire, too.
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Old 11-18-03, 09:21 PM   #11
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Very few of us ride conditions where brake heating is a
problem. I did see perhaps 2 maybe 3 roll offs in racing
back in the '70s, one of which was mine so I am a bit more sensitive perhaps. I do recall messing around with
a variety of cements, some of which were pretty bad
(Tubasti? or maybe it was the Hutchinson) and settled on a contact cement for Formica, tires were damn hard
to get off if they had been on for several months. I
stand corrected on Beloki, heat related but not tubular.
As an experiment last summer I checked my rims (clincher) before the top of the hill on which I live and then rode down at usual 25-28mph 0.3mi to the drive and braked as usual to stop. Rims were 10-15F hotter, not quite too hot to hold but made me wonder where
they would end up after 5-6mi descent through switch
backs. steve
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