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do cycling shoes & pedals give an increase in performance

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do cycling shoes & pedals give an increase in performance

Old 07-14-08, 01:48 AM
  #76  
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There is a much bigger difference between straps/no straps than between straps/clipless. Still, I recommend clipless since it is well worth it.
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Old 07-14-08, 12:23 PM
  #77  
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alright now that im pretty sure my shoes and pedals will fit together im relieved. i tried a similar pair on in my LBS and they fit great so im hoping the ones online will work well. if not you will see them on ebay for about double what i paid for haha
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Old 07-14-08, 01:15 PM
  #78  
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Originally Posted by alanbikehouston View Post
You claim to know a way to ride faster without increasing cadence. Please explain it to the rest of us.
Pedal harder. It's the same way that a Chevy LS1 V8 engine makes more horsepower at 2,000 RPMs than a 1990 Suzuki 750 cc engine makes at 11,000 RPMs.
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Old 07-14-08, 03:04 PM
  #79  
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Clipless pedals make you lazy. Instead of learning to move your foot in a circle, you let the pedal drag it around.

Seriously, the advantages of clipless are grossly overstated. They're necessary for racing and extreme riding, and they give you a zen-like feeling of connectedness and skill mastery which you may enjoy, but in non-extreme riding the increase in efficiency they offer is trivial.

Since you're riding for exercise, it doesn't really matter if you go clipless or not - the quality of your workout depends on how hard you ride, not on how efficient your set-up is, and making your bike more efficient (if indeed clipless pedals accomplish that) doesn't improve the value of your exercise. But if you think you might race, or you want to learn racing skills, by all means go clipless.
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Old 07-14-08, 03:09 PM
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Originally Posted by alanbikehouston View Post
Of course not. Pro riders may get some benefit from properly fitted cycling shoes and "pro" pedals (with properly fitted being the key) but for recreational and fitness riders, they are simply "style" points.

If you are capable of keeping up a 100 RPM cadence with pro shoes and pro pedals, you can also keep up a 100 RPM cadence using the best alternative: BMX pedals and any shoes you own. If you are NOT capable of keeping up a 100 RPM cadence, changing your shoes or pedals won't help.

Why do a mention cadence? Because that is what controls the speed of the bike. Going faster means having a higher cadence...a fitness issue, not a shoe or pedal issue.

By the way, the scientific studies done on pedals indicate that as the pedal rises from six o'clock to twelve o'clock, cyclists are still putting weight ON the pedal. They are not "lifting" the pedal. If you focus on increase your cadence, you will instinctively learn to lift the rising leg as the pedal comes up, but the pedal always will come up faster than your leg. No matter how fast your cadence, the pedal will always be lifting your leg...whatever sort of pedal you have.
I can't BELIEVE it took him this long to get started... OP, obviously, everyone on earth but ABH is wrong, we are all a bunch of lemmings. DO NOT get get clipless.
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Old 07-14-08, 04:10 PM
  #81  
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Originally Posted by alanbikehouston View Post
Am I suggesting cycling shoes are too complex for recreational cyclists? Pro cyclists get pro fittings when they change shoes or pedals. Improperly fitted shoes and pedals lead to foot and knee injuries. During one of Armstrong's last Tour de France campaigns, he was suffering from serious foot pain, because Shimano insisted he use a new Dura-Ace shoe and pedal. After numerous fittings, he was still in intense pain, and finally he went back to his old shoes and old pedals, and won the Tour.

In contrast, I've never seen anyone get a foot injury or knee injury that required surgery while using traditional pedals or BMX pedals. The "unlimited float"...the ability to move the foot and knee freely results in riders finding comfortable postions and riding injury free.

You claim to know a way to ride faster without increasing cadence. Please explain it to the rest of us. You also imply that you are the first cyclist in history that lifts his pedals with his foot, instead of his pedal lifting his foot. I'm sure that you have published many papers on this, just as the people who disagree with you have published their research.
Hi Alan, just thought I'd show you something as it looks as though it hasn't made it to Houston.



This natty device allows you to change gear WITHOUT turning the wheel round ! How cool is that ! I've also heard someone talk of something similar that the changes the front chainring, but that's just crazy talk.
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Old 07-14-08, 08:29 PM
  #82  
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Originally Posted by cooker View Post
Clipless pedals make you lazy. Instead of learning to move your foot in a circle, you let the pedal drag it around.

Seriously, the advantages of clipless are grossly overstated. They're necessary for racing and extreme riding, and they give you a zen-like feeling of connectedness and skill mastery which you may enjoy, but in non-extreme riding the increase in efficiency they offer is trivial.

Since you're riding for exercise, it doesn't really matter if you go clipless or not - the quality of your workout depends on how hard you ride, not on how efficient your set-up is, and making your bike more efficient (if indeed clipless pedals accomplish that) doesn't improve the value of your exercise. But if you think you might race, or you want to learn racing skills, by all means go clipless.
actually this was exactly my thoughts when i was picking out a bike. sure i wanted something durable and something comparable to other "performance" bikes but i didnt care if it was a few pounds heavier or if it wont make me go as fast its the workout. but now that im riding with people with far superior bikes and lower fitness levels it makes me feel like crap when i see them fly by me in portions of my daily climb roads.

also im deciding to spluge on shoes and pedals because i can take them with me to my next bike pretty easily while some other upgrades are pretty much stuck on the bike. thanks for the reply though!
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Old 07-14-08, 10:03 PM
  #83  
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Originally Posted by gcottay View Post
+1 on the benefits of thinking wiping. It really does work well, at least for me. Toward the end of a longish ride when legs being to lose interest, I will do a mile or two putting extra energy into the wiping motion and less into the rest of the stroke. Cadence actually goes up a bit and legs seem to bounce back.
If you point your toe just a bit when you scrape your foot back, your foot won't pull out. Not even with straps loose enough not to cause numbness or to be able to get your foot out quickly.

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Old 07-14-08, 10:20 PM
  #84  
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Originally Posted by mloywhite View Post
I can't BELIEVE it took him this long to get started... OP, obviously, everyone on earth but ABH is wrong, we are all a bunch of lemmings. DO NOT get get clipless.
Well, I don't know ABH or his reputation, and I personally fly my Fred flag high (taling that flag off my bike would help with efficiency!), but I'm still looking for some concrete data that shows first THAT clipless are more efficient (other than subjective human factors rationale), that indicates HOW MUCH more efficient, and that clearly identifies what practical motions are enabled with clipless that cannot be done with well-fitted toeclips with or without cleats.

We've heard all the anecdotes, experienctials, opinions, and hypothesizing, now let's see some evidence.

How can I tell it isn't brainwashing by marketers?

Show me a reason.

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Old 07-15-08, 12:42 AM
  #85  
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Yup, cycling shoes and some good pedals are the way to go. Loooong ago I got my first cycling shoes and pedals and found that it made a world of a difference. One thing, average speed went up quite a bit. And climbing became easier.

I't sup to you. No one is telling you what to do.
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Old 07-26-08, 12:03 AM
  #86  
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just got my pedals installed, took it for a ride with the new shoes i got this week.. all i have to say is wow! what a difference. i just road a mile or so but i could feel the difference immediately. going to do some climbing tomorrow, ill sure ill see an impact in performance
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Old 07-28-08, 07:23 PM
  #87  
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Originally Posted by Nbob View Post
For me it's not so much the "pulling up" but the "wipe" that makes cleats and pedals essential.

I was at a party and ran into a coach for our provincial team- told him about my wussyness going up inclines and asked for some advice. His response:

1. steady fluid strokes
2. don't let the quads do all the work use more hamstring - just after reaching the bottom of the stroke contract the hamstring -think like you're wiping mud off your shoe on a welcome mat.

Never knew that before and it worked wonders.

Without being clipped in feet would just slide off the pedals doing that motion ( although the pedals would likely scrape the mud off you runners so at least you'd have clean shoes)
I'll have to try that...
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Old 07-29-08, 05:50 AM
  #88  
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just as an update i did my first real ride with new shoes and pedals on....before my avg speed was around 14.5, 15 if im lucky...over 15 miles my avg speed was 17.1

id say thats a pretty good increase
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