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Definitive Maintenance Guide

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Definitive Maintenance Guide

Old 07-09-08, 05:23 PM
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Wested
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Definitive Maintenance Guide

Hey, so I've been trying to expand my mechanical capabilities of late. While I can perform basic maintenance, I would like to be able to overhaul free hubs, true a wheel, etc.

Is there a definitive guide to road bike maintenance out there? I've heard that Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance is good, but I figured roadies would know best.
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Old 07-09-08, 05:40 PM
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Vanthel
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try www.bicycletutor.com
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Old 07-09-08, 05:45 PM
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the Park Tool website has great tutorials. I know it's not a book, but you can always print stuff, right? Best of all, if/when something new comes along, they'll update it. So if Campy's new 11 speed stuff needs special treatment, they'll be more likely to have the updated info than a book that might have been printed 5 years ago.
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Old 07-09-08, 05:51 PM
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sgrundy
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It's not cheap, but the Barnett guide is a really good introduction to bicycle mechanics. They use it as a textbook for their repair courses.
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Old 07-09-08, 06:16 PM
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I like The Bicycling Bicycling Guide to Complete Bicycle Maintenance and Repair by Todd Downs. I found it more accessible that Zinn. But it won't teach you how to true a wheel (see Sheldon Brown for that) or overhaul a free hub. For stuff like that, I typically look at the Park Tool website.
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Old 07-09-08, 06:40 PM
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zinn + parktool + sheldon brown is all you need
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Old 07-09-08, 06:56 PM
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the barnett guide is an overwhelming introduction, by a lot.
the park tool blue book, and the zinn book are better for the home mechanic.
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Old 07-09-08, 07:36 PM
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Originally Posted by NYJayhawk View Post
the Park Tool website has great tutorials. I know it's not a book, but you can always print stuff, right? Best of all, if/when something new comes along, they'll update it. So if Campy's new 11 speed stuff needs special treatment, they'll be more likely to have the updated info than a book that might have been printed 5 years ago.
parktool.com is great. It is also available in a book form. Also check out the manufacturer web sites (e.g., http://bike.shimano.com/) for details on specific components.
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Old 07-09-08, 07:47 PM
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I just bought Parks Blue Bicycle Book (whatever). It looks very good. It weren't free.
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