Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

How to Not Get Hit by Cars

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

How to Not Get Hit by Cars

Old 07-30-08, 06:58 AM
  #1  
slyjackson
Drop Master
Thread Starter
 
slyjackson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Orlando FL
Posts: 221

Bikes: Fuji Roubaix / Scott CR-1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
How to Not Get Hit by Cars

Interesting site with tips on how to avoid cars on the road. The Link
slyjackson is offline  
Old 07-30-08, 07:33 AM
  #2  
Ames
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: SW FL
Posts: 422

Bikes: 1980 Motobacane Team Champion 2008 Gary Fisher Hi Fi 2009 Madone 6.9

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
http://www.floridabicycle.org/index.html has a free booklet on correct riding that is funded by the special license plate funds that is also very good, especially for those newer or riders unsure of proper rideing manners. It has a good section on group rides.
Ames is offline  
Old 07-30-08, 07:50 AM
  #3  
Fird
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 27
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
hmm, the worst part of driving a car around a bicyclist at night is when they aren't sufficiently lit, even if they're out from the curb. My night vision isn't very good, so LIGHT YOUR ARSES UP!!

my solution when riding at night: in addition to taking the whole lane when not on a designated bike path, get the brightest headlight you can afford (and you CAN'T find anything close to that in a bike store in the LED category). The cheapest way to do this is to mount something like a Fenix P3d, Surefire 6PL, or Dereelight CL1HV3 if you like exotic batteries. Strap that to either the handle bars or elsewhere on the front of the bike, mounting to the steer tube with tape actually produces a much less bouncy light but it's really dorky looking. Crank up the light and I seriously look like a luxury car with HID's driving down the street. Next get the brightest tail light you can reasonably afford (Planetbike's 1/2 watt version is sufficient for me). Add a high quality reflective vest, mine happens to be an OSHA approved model, and then keep your eyes WIDE open for drunk motorists, because they're the only ones that are likely miss you with all that.
Fird is offline  
Old 07-30-08, 08:55 AM
  #4  
waterrockets 
Making a kilometer blurry
 
waterrockets's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Austin (near TX)
Posts: 26,124

Bikes: rkwaki's porn collection

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Those are good tips.

One note on passing stopped cars on the right: consider lane-splitting instead. There's usually more room.
waterrockets is offline  
Old 07-30-08, 08:59 AM
  #5  
stampylisa
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I agree about the lighting. Sometimes you go to trade shows or other festivals and they give away those clip on blinky lights, so they must really only be a few bucks to buy. i have a few of them, haven't ridden at dark or dusk yet though.
stampylisa is offline  
Old 07-30-08, 10:40 AM
  #6  
wf_mike
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Some great tips. They are some of the exact things I was trying to explain just the other to some of the "experienced" cyclists on this forum. For example, a few from the site...

"The law tells you to ride as far to the right as is practicable. But if you ride too far to the right, someone exiting a parked car could open their door right in front of you, you'll be less visible to motorists pulling out of driveways and parking lots, and motorists coming from behind may pass you way too closely in the same lane because you didn't make them change lanes."

"Don't hug the curb. This is counter-intuitive, but give yourself a little space between yourself and the curb. That gives you some room to move into in case you see a large vehicle in your mirror approaching without moving over far enough to avoid you. Also, when you hug the curb tightly you're more likely to suffer a right cross from motorists who can't see you."

"Don't swerve in and out of the parking lane if it contains any parked cars. You might be tempted to ride in the parking lane where there are no parked cars, dipping back into the traffic lane when you encounter a parked car. This puts you at risk for getting nailed from behind. Instead, ride a steady, straight line in the traffic lane."
wf_mike is offline  
Old 07-30-08, 10:55 AM
  #7  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 23,454

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r

Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3226 Post(s)
Liked 245 Times in 191 Posts
I use lights. Just recently got a headlight. I don't ride at night, they are just for daytime visibility. Lately though I noticed it is darker and the sun is lower in the sky on my way home. At first I thought they would be good because of the speckled sunlight and deep shadows, but then realized they help me a great deal in the city. I have a 1/2 watt led strobe in the back and 1 watt white single led strobe in the front. I also wear bright colors and even have a red flag. I trimmed the flag in length and size so I don't look look stupid. Better they think I look stupid than kill me because they didn't see me.
rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 09-13-08, 11:34 PM
  #8  
uke
it's easy if you let it.
 
uke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: indoors and out.
Posts: 4,124
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Even tiny lights are better than no lights. Bikes are often difficult to see from moving cars, particularly at night.
uke is offline  
Old 09-14-08, 01:25 AM
  #9  
pista
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 195
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Good lnk and very useful.

One thing I want to add is that I do not hesitate to go in the middle of road if my safety depends on it: for example, fast descents, no shoulder (the law here says that if the road is 9 feet or narrower the cyclist can use at will, lots of parked cars, slow traffic, and hard climbs. Don't worry they will pass you by going in the oppisite lane. Never had a problem except some swearing mostly by old rednecks.
pista is offline  
Old 09-14-08, 01:27 AM
  #10  
daoswald
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Salt Lake City, UT (Formerly Los Angeles, CA)
Posts: 1,034

Bikes: 2008 Cannondale Synapse -- 2014 Cannondale Quick CX

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 181 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 30 Times in 17 Posts
50% of my miles each week are ridden between 9:00pm and midnight. I never have to deal with rush hour, people don't seem to be in as much of a hurry, and I believe that with lights, I'm more noticeable, though less recognizable.

I use two rear blinkies; one on my seat post, and one on my left seat-stay, low down near the drop outs. I believe that having two different rear lights at two different positions on the bike will help people to better judge my distance and their rate of approach.

On the front I have a Night Rider Trail Rat II. It lasts 2:20 on a charge. When I first got it I never guessed that I would enjoy riding at night so much, and felt that 2h20m would be adequate. Now I wish I had gone for a 4h model.

At any rate, it's a pretty bright light. It definitely gets peoples' attention.

On my person, I wear a bright colored jersey with reflective segments, and around my ankles I wear a couple of those reflective velcro straps (the ones casual riders use to keep their pant-legs out of the chainrings). I don't have reflectors in my spokes though. My Sidis are reflective from the rear.

I've had many more close calls during the daytime than at night. In fact, I haven't had any close calls at night, whereas during the day -- particularly during rush-hour -- I must sort of fade into the general road chaos, and people start not noticing me. A bike jersey seems to help to some degree.

You can get a Night Rider headlight for under $100, up to $500. You can get rear blinkies anywhere from $10 to $40. I wouldn't think of riding at night without them.
daoswald is offline  
Old 09-14-08, 01:43 AM
  #11  
DasProfezzional
No cud for foil.
 
DasProfezzional's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Baltimore, MD and Montreal, QC
Posts: 1,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Good tips, I guess. Paranoid, but good.
DasProfezzional is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.