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Bike profile for a climber that stays in the seat and grinds the bigger gears

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Bike profile for a climber that stays in the seat and grinds the bigger gears

Old 08-10-08, 09:34 PM
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Bike profile for a climber that stays in the seat and grinds the bigger gears

Hey everyone

I'd like to get your opinions and input on a bike for someone who
- weighs 200lbs
- grinds a larger gear on the flats and the climbs
- prefers to stay in the saddle and grind a larger gear (a la Ullrich - but I'm not him. )
- average speed riding alone (is typically in the 16-18mph range)

Does it really make a difference on what type of bike configuration/flex/etc you require whether you stay sitting down or prefer to dance on the pedals?

I know that there are many, many other factors to selecting a bike; I'd like to know if there's anythig in particular I should look for based on the information above.

The opinions I'm looking for are bike material type, type of bb area flex, frame flex type - or maybe just point me to a bike you know of that would fit this profile - based on the above information.

Thanks in advance!
Mike

Last edited by xfimpg; 08-11-08 at 04:59 AM.
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Old 08-11-08, 03:08 PM
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Ah! No responses means that there is no bike type or profile that would be advantagous when climing sitting down.
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Old 08-11-08, 03:48 PM
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Buy the best bike you can afford.

Your climbing style is not relevant.
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Old 08-11-08, 04:26 PM
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Once you:

1. Shed some weight.
2. Spin more.

Your will:

1. See an increase in your average speed.
2. Climb better.

Unless you are that 0.01% of the population where the above does not apply.
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Old 08-11-08, 04:27 PM
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I almost fit that profile, except that my average speed is a bit higher, and I like to spin my feet faster on flat sections. The only reason that I don't on hills, is because only mountain bike gears are light enough to spin over 70 rpm up anything over 10% slope for me.

My advice? Take him out and let him test ride some bikes. How the bike fits his body, and how it feels under him is a lot more important than stuff like frame stiffness and such. I ride with a guy that is also over 200 lbs, and we like completely different bikes. I prefer carbon and aluminum bikes with a really stiff frame, and a stretched-out cockpit (long-ish top tube, shorter chain-stays, etc.). My freind prefers steel bikes with a more upright position and a longer wheel base. We ride about the same speeds too. It all depends on what feels right.

The more he enjoys and trusts the handling of the bike, the more he will ride it. Take him out for a day of test-rides.

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Old 08-11-08, 04:37 PM
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Originally Posted by xfimpg
Hey everyone

I'd like to get your opinions and input on a bike for someone who
- weighs 200lbs
- grinds a larger gear on the flats and the climbs
- prefers to stay in the saddle and grind a larger gear (a la Ullrich - but I'm not him. )
- average speed riding alone (is typically in the 16-18mph range)

Does it really make a difference on what type of bike configuration/flex/etc you require whether you stay sitting down or prefer to dance on the pedals?

I know that there are many, many other factors to selecting a bike; I'd like to know if there's anythig in particular I should look for based on the information above.

The opinions I'm looking for are bike material type, type of bb area flex, frame flex type - or maybe just point me to a bike you know of that would fit this profile - based on the above information.

Thanks in advance!
Mike
I'm 203lbs...
avg cadence of 80rpm on most rides..
stay in the saddle alot while climbing..
avg speed alone is 16.3mph this year...

i ride an 2004 lemond alpe d'huez...the flex is just fine...I'm sure if you spend a decent amount on any bike you will be able to climb no problem...although i prefer my alu frame of my dads dr1 scott frame which i test rode...his carbon frame was a little flexy while standing on the pedals...so i think thats why i prefer my alu frame
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Old 08-11-08, 07:04 PM
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Yet again, the bike forums brotherhood does not disappoint.

Thanks folks!
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Old 08-11-08, 07:59 PM
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Get the best bike you can afford. Honestly, if you are asking the question, it really doesn't matter. I bought my race bike (and my three other bikes for that matter) based on price and availability in the bike shop I prefer to frequent. It was a good choice. Is it the ideal race bike? Hell if I know. I've only been racing for a year. But it certainly suffices and I am certainly happy with it's ride. Even won a race on it this year.

My suggestion is that you are over-thinking this and you would not be unhappy with pretty much anything you eventually choose, regardless of the criteria you use for choosing it. Go into your favorite shop with a price range in mind, test ride a bike or two in that price range, and buy what feels good to you. If two bikes feel the same under you, choose based on color and value. Try to find a shop that'll let you get in a significant test ride, i.e., let you take it out on the road for an hour or so rather than restricting you to a five minute ride in the parking lot.
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Old 08-11-08, 08:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian Ratliff
Get the best bike you can afford. Honestly, if you are asking the question, it really doesn't matter. I bought my race bike (and my three other bikes for that matter) based on price and availability in the bike shop I prefer to frequent. It was a good choice. Is it the ideal race bike? Hell if I know. I've only been racing for a year. But it certainly suffices and I am certainly happy with it's ride. Even won a race on it this year.

My suggestion is that you are over-thinking this and you would not be unhappy with pretty much anything you eventually choose, regardless of the criteria you use for choosing it. Go into your favorite shop with a price range in mind, test ride a bike or two in that price range, and buy what feels good to you. If two bikes feel the same under you, choose based on color and value. Try to find a shop that'll let you get in a significant test ride, i.e., let you take it out on the road for an hour or so rather than restricting you to a five minute ride in the parking lot.
Hi Brian, I hear what you're saying.
Here's the summary:
I have an aluminum Pinarello; rides like a tank, but heavy to get up the hill, compared to...
I have a carbon specialized roubaix; great comfort and light, but the more upright position makes it harder on the aerodynamic side.
So I'm looking to sell both bikes - I really just need one bike - that is comfortable and climbs well (light!!).

I thought I would ask about the staying in the seat while climbing as I thought it may be important.

Whew, that was long!
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Old 08-11-08, 10:39 PM
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So, get something with a racing geometry like the Pinarello, but in CF so it builds up light. Try a Trek Madone, the racing version, of course. Light, stiff, etc. There are other bikes, of course, too, just so this doesn't turn into some sort of a Trek hater fest. I recommend the Madone simply because I ride one and like it. Oh, and I weighed 200lbs last year at this time too. Now I'm 185 and you wouldn't believe how much easier it is to climb hills.
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Old 08-12-08, 07:02 AM
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^^ I actually think a lot of trek haters have changed their minds about the new madone. I see less flaming during madone threads than there used to be.
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Old 08-12-08, 07:33 AM
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I'd like to think that the lively feel of my steel IF helps me up the grades in or out of the saddle. I'm a very fit 198 pounder and a pretty good climber for a big guy (as long as its not race pace-I'm working on that!). When I was heavier I used to stay seated, but as I get lighter I find that I do more and more stints out of the saddle to break up the monotony and work differnent muscles.

I've never feel like my bike is a hinderance, now that I have it down to less than 18 lbs.
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