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Triple to single chainring?

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Triple to single chainring?

Old 09-30-08, 09:45 AM
  #1  
BowieRider
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Triple to single chainring?

My bike is a Felt F75 with a compact double and a 12-27 cassette. I really enjoy riding that bike and I pretty much stay on the big chainring.

Because I saw a post here of a bike with a single chainring and really liked it and just because I don't have anything better to do, I'd like to convert my other bike, a Lemond Nevada City triple with a 12-26 cassette to a single chainring (50). Can I just remove the big and small chainring; and buy a 50t single chainring, to replace the middle chainring? What would you recommend?
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Old 09-30-08, 10:09 AM
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ElJamoquio
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50 tooth chainrings in triple bolt circle diameter (BCD's) are rare, but you can definitely purchase them.

You'll still need something to keep the chain on the ring - either a derailler, or a third-eye/dog-fang and bash guard, etc.
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Old 09-30-08, 12:56 PM
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I did the same thing on a hardtail MTB. Flip the big ring and mount in where the middle ring was to keep the chain line. You will need a set of short stack bolts but I have never had a problem with the chain comming off.
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Old 09-30-08, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by cdalefan View Post
I have never had a problem with the chain comming off.
Just a matter of time. If you've got a rear derailleur and no chain retention device up front, the chain will definitely come off eventually.

David Millar rode in the Tour with one front ring and nothing else during a prologue a couple of years ago. His chain came off and he lost. Every bike mechanic I know was stunned that a pro wrench would make that kind of mistake. It was stunning.
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Old 09-30-08, 01:47 PM
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48 t are way more common rings. Chain length most likely will need to be rechecked.

Also I'd limit rear travel to +_ 2 sprockets from where chain makes a straight line, effectively cutting your speeds to about 5.

I'd give it a go.
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Old 09-30-08, 02:26 PM
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try and get a chainring that doesn't have ramps and pins for a 1x# setup.
plenty of NOS 6/7/8sp stuff floating around ebay
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Old 09-30-08, 02:46 PM
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Just ride a fixed gear like me, 56/11.
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Old 09-30-08, 02:55 PM
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I used to ride folding bikes a lot, which use only 1 chainring. I didn't have any dropped chains, but some bikes added a chain guide or chain tensioner to make sure.

I'm not a fan of that approach though. Unless you're riding in an area that's very flat, the gearing won't be sufficient. I can't think of any advantage to modifying an existing bike that way, really.
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Old 09-30-08, 08:46 PM
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Thanks for everyone's recommendations. I'll take my bike to my lbs and see what chainrings they have that will fit.
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