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Scratched crystal on computer

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Scratched crystal on computer

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Old 03-09-04, 06:10 PM
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MrEWorm
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Scratched crystal on computer

I did some field repairs the other day. Without realizing it, I must have dragged the Astrale computer on the pavement while messing with a bent rear dropout. Now I can't read the computer very well since the "crystal" is all scratched. Is there a way to repair these scratches or replace the crytal? Cateye online doesn't seem to sell any parts for its little puter.
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Old 03-09-04, 06:11 PM
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djbowen1
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i doubt you will find the parts for that, check ebay or buy a new one.
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Old 03-09-04, 06:42 PM
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I repair vintage watches as a hobbie. Many of these have acrylic (plastic) crystals. Use Brasso and a soft cloth. It will take a lot of elbow grease, so get your rag and brasso and sit down and watch a movie while you do it.
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Old 03-09-04, 08:43 PM
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Or toothpaste
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Old 03-09-04, 09:40 PM
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A well stocked hardware store will have a selection of polishing compounds. There are specific compounds and types of buffing wheels for plastic.
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Old 03-09-04, 10:39 PM
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Or you might want to check out an aviation shop or marine shop. Airplanes have plexiglass windshields and aircraft supply shops sell buffing/polishing/cleaning/repairing compounds.
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Old 03-10-04, 03:30 AM
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Brasso or toothpaste are the fastest way. Toothpaste, in fact, is quick and cheap, since you should already have some in the house!
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Old 03-10-04, 05:03 AM
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Originally Posted by TrekRider
Brasso or toothpaste are the fastest way. Toothpaste, in fact, is quick and cheap, since you should already have some in the house!
and the computer will be "minty fresh"!!
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Old 03-10-04, 06:27 AM
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MrEWorm
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Great ideas. Thanks!
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Old 03-10-04, 07:36 AM
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by the sounds of it, dragging it along the pavement doesnt sound repairable, will these solutions help in general with scratched glass or plastic.
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Old 03-10-04, 08:22 AM
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I went at it with some elbow grease and plexiglas cleaner (for cleaning my convertible top and Harley windshield). Six applications took off the gross scratches. I then used a little toothpaste for the finishing touch.
No one will confuse the thing for "like new" condition due to scratches on the casing, but the screen is now legible. Now I'll be able to see how pitifully low my cadence is.
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Old 03-10-04, 10:45 AM
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for expensive watches with acrylic crystals ... toothpaste or a substance called polywatch can be used

should work for this as well
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