Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

EA70 wheels, or Ultegra hub + CXP33 rims?

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

EA70 wheels, or Ultegra hub + CXP33 rims?

Old 10-21-08, 10:42 PM
  #1  
Unagidon
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Unagidon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Lawrence, KS
Posts: 1,331

Bikes: 15 Niner Jet9 RDO, 08 Cervelo RS, 08 Surly Crosscheck, Mid-90's Python Mtb

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
EA70 wheels, or Ultegra hub + CXP33 rims?

Looking to change my 91 Miyata from 7 speed to 10, and need to change wheels/hubs. I'm thinking about spending around $300, and I can pick up a set of EA70 wheels for approx. $350, or a set of CXP33 with Ultegra hubs for around $300.

What would you choose?
Unagidon is offline  
Old 10-21-08, 11:05 PM
  #2  
thirdin77
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: San Jose, Ca
Posts: 1,213

Bikes: 09 Specialized Tricross Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You're going to have to give some background.. Your weight? Roads really bad? Lots of climbing? Lots of sprinting?

If the CXP33/Ultegra wheels are 32-holed 3x-laced, then nearly anyone will say they'll be more durable if they're well-made.

Other than 10-speed compatibility, what is it you're after?

Last edited by thirdin77; 10-21-08 at 11:09 PM.
thirdin77 is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 07:59 AM
  #3  
Unagidon
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Unagidon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Lawrence, KS
Posts: 1,331

Bikes: 15 Niner Jet9 RDO, 08 Cervelo RS, 08 Surly Crosscheck, Mid-90's Python Mtb

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by thirdin77 View Post
You're going to have to give some background.. Your weight? Roads really bad? Lots of climbing? Lots of sprinting?

If the CXP33/Ultegra wheels are 32-holed 3x-laced, then nearly anyone will say they'll be more durable if they're well-made.

Other than 10-speed compatibility, what is it you're after?
I weigh 160lb. Road's are not great at all - lot's of chip and seal - and typically rolling hill's.

I ride for fitness and for fun in group rides - averaging around 16mph on 3 hour rides. What am I after? Honestly, apart from having to upgrade to 10 speed, I just want something that rolls well, easy maintenance and preferably light.

I'm running Easton Orion II's on my Look 555, and love them. Currently running Wolber TX Profil on the Miata with 600EX hubs, so I'm assuming the Ultegra hubs will be similar. They don't spin as well as my Easton, but I don't think it's a fair comparison - 17 year old hub technology (but NOS) vs. 1.5 years old.

Thanks!
Unagidon is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 11:40 AM
  #4  
thirdin77
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: San Jose, Ca
Posts: 1,213

Bikes: 09 Specialized Tricross Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Unagidon View Post
I weigh 160lb. Road's are not great at all - lot's of chip and seal - and typically rolling hill's.

I'm running Easton Orion II's on my Look 555, and love them....
Thanks!
Are you running your Orion II's on the described terrain and without problems? If so, consider that the EA70's have the same spoke count as the Orion II's and are the successors to the Circuits, which were known for their durability. I vote that you get the EA70's.
thirdin77 is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 11:45 AM
  #5  
tekhna
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The ultegra/CXP 33s will be stiff and sturdy as nails. I'd do Ultegra/Niobium 30s though if it were me.
tekhna is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 11:51 AM
  #6  
AEO
Senior Member
 
AEO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: A Coffin Called Earth. or Toronto, ON
Posts: 12,258

Bikes: Bianchi, Miyata, Dahon, Rossin

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
kinlin niobium 30mm rims are around the same cost as CXP33 as far as what's available to the end user.
but if it's prebuilt, cxp33 is usually cheaper
__________________
Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm
AEO is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 12:11 PM
  #7  
rjs0702
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 144

Bikes: Scott SR20

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I am 6'0, 157 lbs. and I got the EA 70's. To me the wheels made a world of difference and are pretty durable, haven't had to true them yet and have had them since this past summer. The roads out here are pretty rough usually all of them are old and really bumpy, or have lots of cracks or missing pavement or bumps, etc.. But I have never had a problem, I vote the Eastons.
rjs0702 is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 12:17 PM
  #8  
tekhna
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
470 grams, 23.6mm rim depth versus 455 grams 30mm depth. Slightly lighter (non-factor essentially) and more aero. I used to ride CXP-33s and now I ride Niobium 30s, and I don't notice a difference in stiffness at 170 pounds. And they're slightly cheaper actually, 60/rim compared to 70. I'd go with the Niobiums.
tekhna is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 12:44 PM
  #9  
Hocam
Ho-Jahm
 
Hocam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Manchester, NH
Posts: 4,228
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You'll get significantly more miles out of an ultegra - whatever rim build than a low spoke count factory wheelset, but at the cost of weight. Also, the ultegra build which be much easier to service, same goes for traditional spokes.
Hocam is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 03:03 PM
  #10  
Unagidon
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Unagidon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Lawrence, KS
Posts: 1,331

Bikes: 15 Niner Jet9 RDO, 08 Cervelo RS, 08 Surly Crosscheck, Mid-90's Python Mtb

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What are Niobiums? Never heard of them before. I did a search, and it appears it's not a brand, but a metal. Is there a brand that uses them?
Unagidon is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 03:09 PM
  #11  
tekhna
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Unagidon View Post
What are Niobiums? Never heard of them before. I did a search, and it appears it's not a brand, but a metal. Is there a brand that uses them?
They're made by KinLin.
http://fairwheelbikes.com/kinlin-xr3...ole-p-265.html

I think they've pretty much become the standard recommended rim, along with the DT Swiss R1.1 and 1.2
tekhna is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 05:52 PM
  #12  
Unagidon
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Unagidon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Lawrence, KS
Posts: 1,331

Bikes: 15 Niner Jet9 RDO, 08 Cervelo RS, 08 Surly Crosscheck, Mid-90's Python Mtb

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Hocam View Post
You'll get significantly more miles out of an ultegra - whatever rim build than a low spoke count factory wheelset, but at the cost of weight. Also, the ultegra build which be much easier to service, same goes for traditional spokes.
The easy service is what attracts me to a build. My wrenching skill is limited to adjusting the seat and pumping air, so reliability is quite important. That said, my Easton Orion II's have treated me quite well - never had to true them yet after 1600 miles. I'm not very hard on my bike though, as I have neither the power nor the Cadence to kill them.

The Niobiums seem attractive, except I can't find any places that carry them around here. Is it safer to buy custom builds at LBS, or just as good at a reputable Internet shop, like Coloradocyclist.com?
Unagidon is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 05:55 PM
  #13  
Matt Gaunt
Senior Member
 
Matt Gaunt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: London, UK
Posts: 2,284
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'd probably go for the Ultegra / CXP or Open Pro option if it was me.

Where's BT when you need his opinion?
__________________
Matt
2018 Enigma Excel Pic|| 2010 Kinesis Decade Convert2 Pic || 2008 Kinesis RC2 Pics || 2007 Kinesis Pha5e Pics || 2005 Kinesis RC Pics || 1996 Raleigh Max Pics
Matt Gaunt is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 07:56 PM
  #14  
BananaTugger
CPM M4
 
BananaTugger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: The West Side (Of Rochester, NY).
Posts: 4,930

Bikes: Light.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Unagidon View Post
Looking to change my 91 Miyata from 7 speed to 10, and need to change wheels/hubs. I'm thinking about spending around $300, and I can pick up a set of EA70 wheels for approx. $350, or a set of CXP33 with Ultegra hubs for around $300.

What would you choose?
Handbuilts.

Originally Posted by Unagidon View Post
The easy service is what attracts me to a build. My wrenching skill is limited to adjusting the seat and pumping air, so reliability is quite important. That said, my Easton Orion II's have treated me quite well - never had to true them yet after 1600 miles. I'm not very hard on my bike though, as I have neither the power nor the Cadence to kill them.

The Niobiums seem attractive, except I can't find any places that carry them around here. Is it safer to buy custom builds at LBS, or just as good at a reputable Internet shop, like Coloradocyclist.com?
Colorado Cyclist is a good start if you need a Mavic or DT rim built into a wheel. So are Texas Cyclesport and Prowheelbuilder.com.

Prowheelbuilder now stocks IRD Cadence rims, which are rebranded KinLin Niobium rims. They have 22mm and 30mm Niobium rims available. Have them build some up with White Industries H2 hubs with 24 radial front/28 2x rear, and you'll have a very solid set of wheels that will handle most anything.
__________________
Ten tenths.
BananaTugger is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 10:23 PM
  #15  
Unagidon
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Unagidon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Lawrence, KS
Posts: 1,331

Bikes: 15 Niner Jet9 RDO, 08 Cervelo RS, 08 Surly Crosscheck, Mid-90's Python Mtb

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by BananaTugger View Post
Handbuilts.



Colorado Cyclist is a good start if you need a Mavic or DT rim built into a wheel. So are Texas Cyclesport and Prowheelbuilder.com.

Prowheelbuilder now stocks IRD Cadence rims, which are rebranded KinLin Niobium rims. They have 22mm and 30mm Niobium rims available. Have them build some up with White Industries H2 hubs with 24 radial front/28 2x rear, and you'll have a very solid set of wheels that will handle most anything.
BT - Your suggestion is quite pricey... Let me ask you this, what is the key difference (apart from weight) between Ultegra vs Dura-Ace hubs? I've done a search and can't find any definite answers so I'm hoping you'll have some facts.

If you had $350 to spend (max) and can't do any wrenching at all, what would you recommend? And is Dura-Ace hubs that much better than Ultegra?
Unagidon is offline  
Old 10-22-08, 10:40 PM
  #16  
kergin
Senior Member
 
kergin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Kitchener, ON
Posts: 2,032

Bikes: 1994 Proctor Townsend Reynolds 753, TT S3 True North, Kona Major Jake, Kona Honky Tonk, Marinoni Puima, Cannondale BBU

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Dura Ace hubs spin so nice and freely. You just have to try it out for yourself. I'd take an upgrade from Ultegra to Dura Ace hubs any day.
kergin is offline  
Old 10-23-08, 12:36 AM
  #17  
tkehler
Senior Member
 
tkehler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: My family and I -- wife and two young children -- live in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 723

Bikes: TST ti 'cross bike (commuter); Guru ti road bike; recumbent; Airnimal Chameleon folding racing bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have Ultegra/CXP33 rimmed wheels. When I got them, my LBS owner said -- "I hear they'll beat you up a bit." I had no idea what he was talking about.

Then I learned. They are stiff and unyielding.

I bought a pair of ROL Volant wheels, used but in good shape -- look 'em up, they win awards -- and I couldn't be happier. The other day I put on the Ultegra/CXP33 wheelset thinking I'd use them from now on, i.e., for winter riding and commuting, and keep the lighter/faster Volants for spring and summer. Uh uh. Nope.

So my advice is: Get something other than the Ultegra CXP33's.

PS -- I'm 6 one, 180 lbs, and I ride a titanium 'cross bike as my all-'rounder.
tkehler is offline  
Old 10-23-08, 06:10 PM
  #18  
BananaTugger
CPM M4
 
BananaTugger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: The West Side (Of Rochester, NY).
Posts: 4,930

Bikes: Light.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Unagidon View Post
BT - Your suggestion is quite pricey... Let me ask you this, what is the key difference (apart from weight) between Ultegra vs Dura-Ace hubs? I've done a search and can't find any definite answers so I'm hoping you'll have some facts.

If you had $350 to spend (max) and can't do any wrenching at all, what would you recommend? And is Dura-Ace hubs that much better than Ultegra?
Dura-Ace hubs are lighter, shinier and cost more. The bearings in Dura-Ace hubs are also a little better (rounder) and have an anti-rust treatment.

For $350, I'd use Ultegra HB-6600 hubs laced to Niobium 30mm rims with DT Revolution spokes. Prowheelbuilder.com can do this for about $370. You could also specify a Shimano 105 front hub to bring down the cost a little more.
__________________
Ten tenths.
BananaTugger is offline  
Old 10-23-08, 06:14 PM
  #19  
Lucky07
Ride 365
 
Lucky07's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: NYC/UpperDutchess, NY
Posts: 1,882

Bikes: '06 Cannondale Six 13 Pro 2, '05 Specialized Allez Elite, '04 Jamis Satellite, 90's Raleigh M-45 single speed conversion, 80's Fuji Team single speed conversion, 70's Schwinn World Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've got CXPs w. Ultegra hubs. They're excellent training/winter wheels in my opinion.
Lucky07 is offline  
Old 10-23-08, 06:17 PM
  #20  
AEO
Senior Member
 
AEO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: A Coffin Called Earth. or Toronto, ON
Posts: 12,258

Bikes: Bianchi, Miyata, Dahon, Rossin

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
or even tiagra hubs.

you save, oh... 5g off of the rear freehub from going with ultegra over 105
__________________
Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm
AEO is offline  
Old 10-23-08, 06:43 PM
  #21  
Unagidon
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Unagidon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Lawrence, KS
Posts: 1,331

Bikes: 15 Niner Jet9 RDO, 08 Cervelo RS, 08 Surly Crosscheck, Mid-90's Python Mtb

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by BananaTugger View Post
Dura-Ace hubs are lighter, shinier and cost more. The bearings in Dura-Ace hubs are also a little better (rounder) and have an anti-rust treatment.

For $350, I'd use Ultegra HB-6600 hubs laced to Niobium 30mm rims with DT Revolution spokes. Prowheelbuilder.com can do this for about $370. You could also specify a Shimano 105 front hub to bring down the cost a little more.
Thanks BT. And what lacing? 32 radial, 32 3x back? Or I was considering 28 radial, 32 3x back? Finally, what the heck is the difference between the revolution spokes vs. the champion spokes? Is it purely weight?


Thanks.
Unagidon is offline  
Old 10-23-08, 06:57 PM
  #22  
BananaTugger
CPM M4
 
BananaTugger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: The West Side (Of Rochester, NY).
Posts: 4,930

Bikes: Light.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Unagidon View Post
Thanks BT. And what lacing? 32 radial, 32 3x back? Or I was considering 28 radial, 32 3x back? Finally, what the heck is the difference between the revolution spokes vs. the champion spokes? Is it purely weight?


Thanks.
I'd do 28 radial front/32 3x DS, 2x NDS rear. Put what lacing you want in the notes.

Revolutions are bladed, butted (different widths and amounts of material along the length of the spoke) a fair bit lighter than Champions, which are straight gauge (same amount of material throughout the spoke length).
__________________
Ten tenths.
BananaTugger is offline  
Old 10-23-08, 06:58 PM
  #23  
schnee
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 3,368
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm 260, ride Ultegra / Velocity Deep V.
32 spoke 3-cross rear.
28-spoke 2-cross front.
Only needed one slight truing after 5k miles.
schnee is offline  
Old 10-23-08, 09:10 PM
  #24  
Unagidon
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Unagidon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Lawrence, KS
Posts: 1,331

Bikes: 15 Niner Jet9 RDO, 08 Cervelo RS, 08 Surly Crosscheck, Mid-90's Python Mtb

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Okay, I've been researching wheels for the past 2 hours or so. Theoretically, mass produced wheels (machine) should offer economies of scale, thus, better componentry/quality for less cost. I just went outside to examine my Orion II's - 24 spokes radial front, and 28 spokes (radial on non-drive side + single crossed on drive side). Based on everything I've read, it's basically NOT the way to build a wheel. However, the ride is great! And from what I know, they're supposed to be very reliable.

Yet, many people swear by custom wheels. And I just can't understand why a decent quality custom wheel costing around or even < $300 (Ultegra + Open Pro let's say) can be better than a machine built wheel costing around the same price (economically speaking)? Do the laws of mass production, general economics, and robotic technology simply not apply to wheels?
Unagidon is offline  
Old 10-23-08, 09:17 PM
  #25  
AEO
Senior Member
 
AEO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: A Coffin Called Earth. or Toronto, ON
Posts: 12,258

Bikes: Bianchi, Miyata, Dahon, Rossin

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
if you buy a machine made wheel, have a local wheel builder or yourself redo the tension so that they are even.
__________________
Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm
AEO is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.