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When do you change tires

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

When do you change tires

Old 11-19-08, 03:32 AM
  #26  
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Check the tires for holes, as in "measuring" holes. Slick tires usually have these holes. It is to see how low the rubber is.
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Old 11-19-08, 08:07 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by jamesshuang View Post
When this happens:


I'm glad I got good tires in this case, haha. Descending behind a car, when i saw brake lights. I instinctively reached with my right hand... and locked my rear wheel. Still counting my lucky stars I got good kevlar tires...
Anyone need any more proof that you should NOT USE YOUR REAR BRAKE? In a panic situation, you instinctively resort to what you have trained yourself to do, so don't use your rear brake.
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Old 11-19-08, 08:18 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by San Rensho View Post
Anyone need any more proof that you should NOT USE YOUR REAR BRAKE? In a panic situation, you instinctively resort to what you have trained yourself to do, so don't use your rear brake.
I respectively disagree...... Years and years of motorcycling has taught me that the front brake should and can do 80% or so of the braking due to weight transfer. While the back brake is less effective it will add to your stopping power as long as it is MODULATED. Learning to use the rear brake is not rocket science but does need to be practiced.
As a Ducati owner.....do you use your Duck's front brake only? I bet not.
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Old 11-19-08, 08:24 AM
  #29  
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Wow. Some amazing photos.
I would personally never let my tire get to a condition anywhere close to those photos.
But I admit that I never quite know when to replace them, because I don't want to let the tire get too worn before replacing.
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Old 11-19-08, 09:44 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by San Rensho View Post
Anyone need any more proof that you should NOT USE YOUR REAR BRAKE? In a panic situation, you instinctively resort to what you have trained yourself to do, so don't use your rear brake.
Clearly I untrained myself ASAP... that was SERIOUSLY scary, especially when the entire rear of the bike decided to veer probably 15 degrees off my direction of travel. The guy behind me said I left about a 10 foot streak on the road. Now I instinctively reach for my front, and brace properly too...
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Old 11-19-08, 10:24 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by garysol1 View Post
I respectively disagree...... Years and years of motorcycling has taught me that the front brake should and can do 80% or so of the braking due to weight transfer. While the back brake is less effective it will add to your stopping power as long as it is MODULATED. Learning to use the rear brake is not rocket science but does need to be practiced.
As a Ducati owner.....do you use your Duck's front brake only? I bet not.
Interesting knowledge but I'd have to say motorcycle dynamics are rather different. The weight and speed difference between a motorcycle and a bike are too great. I for one have never seen a bike sliding the rear going while breaking into a corner.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLw2OJWcRs8
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Old 11-19-08, 10:37 AM
  #32  
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How about this?

What type of riding makes tires last longer or shorter? Is it the rider's weight, the tire inflation, the tire itself, the road conditions like broken glass, nails, etc.

Are we too quick to blame the tire itself?
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Old 11-19-08, 10:40 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by Garfield Cat View Post
How about this?

What type of riding makes tires last longer or shorter? Is it the rider's weight, the tire inflation, the tire itself, the road conditions like broken glass, nails, etc.


Are we too quick to blame the tire itself?
yes
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Old 11-19-08, 10:44 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by erliuic View Post
Interesting knowledge but I'd have to say motorcycle dynamics are rather different.
weight transfer is weight transfer. As long as the back tire is on the ground it will provide additional braking.
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Old 11-19-08, 10:48 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by garysol1 View Post
weight transfer is weight transfer. As long as the back tire is on the ground it will provide additional braking.
Along those lines I have never understood those that seem to think that a rear brake is worthless.

If any of you truly think a rear brake is worthless then remove yours or STFU.
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Old 11-19-08, 11:10 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Garfield Cat View Post
How about this?

What type of riding makes tires last longer or shorter? Is it the rider's weight, the tire inflation, the tire itself, the road conditions like broken glass, nails, etc.

Are we too quick to blame the tire itself?
Well, having done a 4000 mile cross country tour this summer with a pretty large group, I can say empirically that it's almost entirely due to rider's weight. One of the heavier guys burned through nearly 6 tires. I went through 4. Some of the lighter girls got most of the way across on just two. We all had tires inflated to sidewall specs every morning.

The heavier guy and I both changed tires (same brand) on the same day. He's probably around 40 lbs heavier than me. About 1000 miles later, he skidded his rear wheel and the tire literally ruptured laterally. I'm still using the same tire...

Obviously a lot of it is luck as well. We had some... interesting punctures. One guy got a 4" nail stuck straight through the tire. Another one had a toggle switch jammed through the tire...
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Old 11-19-08, 11:40 AM
  #37  
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Yeah agreed, rider weight has the most to do with it and I'm no fly weight at 200lbs (though I'm probably 210lbs right now ).

JamesShuang: what make/model tire did you use and what size?

I pump my tires once/week now (just cant be bothered to pump them every couple of days) and the ride towards the end of the week is just so smooth.
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Old 11-19-08, 11:50 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by mustang1 View Post
Yeah agreed, rider weight has the most to do with it and I'm no fly weight at 200lbs (though I'm probably 210lbs right now ).

JamesShuang: what make/model tire did you use and what size?

I pump my tires once/week now (just cant be bothered to pump them every couple of days) and the ride towards the end of the week is just so smooth.
I'm currently on Specialized Armadillo 700x25 tires. The back tire has probably around 1200 miles on it, but it's still holding up for me. Just for reference, I'm probably around 170 lbs. I forget the brand of the previous set I had on (the striped gray one that I destroyed). The front tire (which was also that brand) was perfectly fine except for a day with some bad luck. I pumped the tire up to 120 psi in the morning, and forgot that we ascended nearly 4000 feet that day. It blew up in my face (left quite a ringing in my ears!) I swapped them out for some old stock Bontrager tires, also 700x25's. They're holding up surprisingly well, probably around 1800-2000 miles on it now.

A lot of team members also had very positive experience with the Continental Gatorskins, 700x23. The lighter people rode the stock bontragers to Kansas, and most of them swapped to Gatorskins there, and rode the rest of the way with them.

I try to pump my tires up every other time I ride. I've become accustomed to nice stiff tires, so I rarely let them below 80-90 psi. I usually pump them up to sidewall pressure, so the back gets 120 psi, the front gets 100.

Last edited by jamesshuang; 11-19-08 at 11:59 AM.
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Old 11-19-08, 11:50 AM
  #39  
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When I start getting a lot of flats... the problem is determining when the normal quantity of flats turns into an exorbitant number of flats.
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Old 11-19-08, 01:52 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by jamesshuang View Post
Well, having done a 4000 mile cross country tour this summer with a pretty large group, I can say empirically that it's almost entirely due to rider's weight. One of the heavier guys burned through nearly 6 tires. I went through 4. Some of the lighter girls got most of the way across on just two. We all had tires inflated to sidewall specs every morning.

The heavier guy and I both changed tires (same brand) on the same day. He's probably around 40 lbs heavier than me. About 1000 miles later, he skidded his rear wheel and the tire literally ruptured laterally. I'm still using the same tire...

Obviously a lot of it is luck as well. We had some... interesting punctures. One guy got a 4" nail stuck straight through the tire. Another one had a toggle switch jammed through the tire...
You pumped them to "sidewall" pressure is why. I weigh 185lbs and I pump my tires up to no more than 110 psi, and most of the time more along the lines of 104/107 psi fr/back (these are pro race 2's, 700x23c). The more pressure in your tires, the shorter the lifetime.

Even when I was 200lbs, I'd get waaaayyyyy more than 1000 miles out of a rear tire. Many road cyclists pump their tires up way too high. I started out that way and was pleasantly surprised to find that my tire lasted 4x longer and handled better at 105psi vs. 120. I got less puncture flats too, and no broken tire casing cords.
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Old 11-19-08, 01:58 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by Brian Ratliff View Post
Many road cyclists pump their tires up way too high. I started out that way and was pleasantly surprised to find that my tire lasted 4x longer and handled better at 105psi vs. 120. I got less puncture flats too, and no broken tire casing cords.
It's one of the many bits of advice bandied about on BF I've learned to ignore. I keep at least 10lb under max pressure, and it makes for a much smoother ride.
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Old 11-19-08, 02:06 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by San Rensho View Post
Why is this even a question? When they wear out, period. I will easily go through 3 or 4 rears in a season of just moderate riding.
What tyres are you using?!?! I suggest you try Conti Gatorskins. I've been riding on a pair of these all year, still plenty of life left in them. Are you one of the people who turns up for a clubrun on racing tyres, then gets two flats before the tea stop? Gatorskins LAST, and they are fairly puncture resistant. Did I mention that they last forever?
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Old 11-19-08, 02:10 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Basil Moss View Post
What tyres are you using?!?! I suggest you try Conti Gatorskins. I've been riding on a pair of these all year, still plenty of life left in them. Are you one of the people who turns up for a clubrun on racing tyres, then gets two flats before the tea stop? Gatorskins LAST, and they are fairly puncture resistant. Did I mention that they last forever?
How many miles is forever?
Thanks
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Old 11-19-08, 02:19 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by Basil Moss View Post
What tyres are you using?!?! I suggest you try Conti Gatorskins. I've been riding on a pair of these all year, still plenty of life left in them. Are you one of the people who turns up for a clubrun on racing tyres, then gets two flats before the tea stop? Gatorskins LAST, and they are fairly puncture resistant. Did I mention that they last forever?
tyres... clubrun... tea stop...

Man, you must be a Brit or something . Kidding, kidding...

Anyways, you don't need Conti Gatorskins to keep from getting flats and have long tire life. I tell you, it's all in the tire pressure you are using. I started racing last year. Since then I've ridden probably around 10,000 miles (it's been since last August, 2007, so a little more than a year - maybe a bit more) and have just changed my rear tire for the second time. The first was a 700x23c Bontrager RaceXLite (came with the bike), which is a racing tire and pretty fragile; it lasted something like 3000 miles, most of which were trainer miles (it was pretty squared off by the time it was put to the trainer - soft tread). The second was a 700x23c Michelin PR2 tire and lasted over 7000 miles. I changed it just last week after it was worn all the way around, nearly to the casing.

Your tire pressure should be high enough to avoid pinch flats and low enough to avoid most puncture flats. For me, at 185lbs, that's about 105 psi. I race on that too and I don't feel like I'm giving anything up.
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