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I was thinking about getting a fixed gear...

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I was thinking about getting a fixed gear...

Old 02-20-09, 07:28 PM
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Originally Posted by MarkSLC
Talked out of it yet?
nope... I'm picking one up next week. btw that picture is disgusting.
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Old 02-20-09, 08:32 PM
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Originally Posted by weavers
try using your current bike as a fixie. just stay in one gear all the time, say 50-19 or something similar.(alot of fixies use 47-17, you can find something simlar) i tired doing this for a week on my daily commute. i thought a fixie would be great, cause it would be lighter, less chain wear, and maitence. problem was start from traffic lights and once i was at a decent speed i really couldn't go any faster. i hated having my speed caped at 22mph and the worst part is tired dead legs and not being able to use granny gears. even for a short 5mile or 12mile commute it sucked day in and day out. just to much crap to put up with.
You really have to go all in...
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Old 02-20-09, 08:35 PM
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Originally Posted by mangovich
get fixed, and ride brakeless. i've turned my communtes into workouts. every morning/evening i have the burning legs. slowing down/stopping hurts oh so bad, but i've seen my guads grow a lot in time i've been riding.
FAIL
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Old 02-20-09, 08:38 PM
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Originally Posted by captnfantastic
talk me out of it?
There too somple. You will never want to upgrade again.
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Old 02-21-09, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by captnfantastic
nope... I'm picking one up next week. btw that picture is disgusting.
Not fair. The OP of that pic deleted his post, now Im the one stuck with it. Oh well, Im leaving it up. I'm staying. I'm finishing my coffee


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Old 02-21-09, 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by mangovich
get fixed, and ride brakeless. i've turned my communtes into workouts. every morning/evening i have the burning legs. slowing down/stopping hurts oh so bad, but i've seen my guads grow a lot in time i've been riding.
I ride brakeless, but I would never flat out recommend it. My Raleigh isn't drilled for a front brake, and IMO running a rear brake on a fixed gear is a bit redundant. I've been riding this setup for 2 years and havent run into any problems except for the first couple weeks on the bike, which was just me getting used to it. I've noticed that I ride very defensively when I'm on my fixed because I know I have no brakes. I don't bomb stops or reds and I am constantly looking over my shoulder, especially if I'm about to turn right. I know a lot of 'kids' who ride brakeless with no regard for themselves or their surroundings. But I've been noticing more and more of these 'kids' are starting to run front brakes.

But it's true, backpedalling (stopping with your legs) uses muscles that you don't really use that often, and you will notice the fronts of your quads getting bigger. So if you run a front brake, try not to use it unless you need it.. even going downhill.
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Old 02-21-09, 02:51 PM
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Not disagreeing with anything you're saying, but I want to throw in that back pedaling is also adding an eccentric component to what is otherwise an entirely concentric exercise. This will make you stronger, no doubt, but will that strength be applicable to biking on a bike equipped with a freewheel?

I use backpressure often even though I run a front brake, though more for low speed control, ie., slowing to a stop or biding time if I need to wait for a car or pedestrian. That being said, I also squat 2-3 times a week, deadlift, and powerclean often, as well as commuting to and from my work (only 5 miles each way). Using back pressure all the time would seriously be far too much work for me, so I reserve me energy for going forwards and having a decent spin.

This isn;t to say anything you said was wrong, or that I disagree, merely offereing another perspective. You can decide not to use your front brake if you have it, though the same isn't true if it's not there; you'll also stop MUCH faster with one that without. Just don't endo.
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Old 02-21-09, 03:05 PM
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Originally Posted by PoopinFresh
Not disagreeing with anything you're saying, but I want to throw in that back pedaling is also adding an eccentric component to what is otherwise an entirely concentric exercise. This will make you stronger, no doubt, but will that strength be applicable to biking on a bike equipped with a freewheel?

I use backpressure often even though I run a front brake, though more for low speed control, ie., slowing to a stop or biding time if I need to wait for a car or pedestrian. That being said, I also squat 2-3 times a week, deadlift, and powerclean often, as well as commuting to and from my work (only 5 miles each way). Using back pressure all the time would seriously be far too much work for me, so I reserve me energy for going forwards and having a decent spin.

This isn;t to say anything you said was wrong, or that I disagree, merely offereing another perspective. You can decide not to use your front brake if you have it, though the same isn't true if it's not there; you'll also stop MUCH faster with one that without. Just don't endo.
Yeah, don't endo unless you know what you're doing and there's some poon and the end of it for you. Also, make sure you don't have a super sesitive front brake. My buddy and I were riding along and out of nowhere, he endoed straight over his handle bars. Luckily, he wasn't hurt, but I was in pain from laughing my ass off. Turned out, he simply brought his hand up and accidentally tugged slightly on his brake line, locked the front wheel right up. There is such a thing as too good of brakes.

It's true that the muscle isn't something you'll necesserily rely on for free spinning, but it helps with overall fat burning. I do feel a noticeable overall 'strain' on my legs when I backpedal, especailly downhill. I also lock up and skid a lot when I'm coming to a stop, so I usually don't backpedal the entire way from a sprint to a dead stop. But you're right, use it whenever the hell you feel you need it. If you don't care about having the ability to stop with your legs, then screw it- use the brake.
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Old 02-21-09, 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by ddac
You guys are forgetting that the OP is a roadie. He should knows how to use a front brake. IMO, a road cyclist is probably one of the more skilled front brake users around.

Mtn bike riders use lots of rear brakes on trails
Beach cruisers don't go fast enough
Hybrid riders normally don't ride as fast as road cyclist
BMX riders don't go fast enough

So I say a road cyclist has the most experience with a front brake.

Of course there are exceptions.......
This is true. I think the OP can handle himself just fine.

Well, I think we all did a great job of not talking him out of getting a fixed gear, good and proper. Funny, I was expecting the roadies to flame him and really try to talk him out of it. Makes me that much more stoked on being a roadie and a fixed gear rider. There's a lot of the 'scene' turds in Salt Lake who give me **** for building up my road bike and rocking lycra. It's funny, though, because they claim to be these 'die hard cycling purists', but in reality they're just scenesters hopping on a fad. A real cyclist should be comfortable riding whatever, whenever.
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Old 02-21-09, 05:59 PM
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55 years old and just made a fixed gear bike. It's fun. Not a replacement for the road bike, but definitely a different way to ride.
I'd say if you have a few extra bucks, do it. I'm enjoying the discipline of riding mine.
I do admit I ride it like a roadie in training, and not like a brakeless hipster. But I'm having fun on it.
I plan to commute on it, just cause, next year.

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Old 02-21-09, 06:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Bluechip
He said he wanted to be talked out of it.

With a 20sp. bike you are 19 times more likely to be in the correct gear.
Have you ever tried to adjust the straps on your shoes on a fixed gear?
Just try to readjust your chamois while on a fixed gear.
Uphills are tough on a fixed gear.
Downhill are even tougher.
Headwinds force you into a slower cadence than normal.
Tailwinds make you pedal like mad.
You will obsess over chainline.


Go ahead and get one. You know you want to.



You will stop taking a bath and dodge soap

You will feel a need to dress like a kid from the 1920's

Vintage roadies will yell at you when they see you chopped off the deraileur hanger from some vintage lugged steelie you turned into a "track bike"

You will feel the need to have 2 pairs of toe straps on your clipped pedals

You will eventaully put your head thru the rear windshield of a stopping/stopped car because you have no real brakes on your "track bike"

You will feel the need to put post cards in your spokes

You will end up with some hot young tatoo'ed girlfriend who doesnt shave (or shower)

You will find your world very small compared to that of a roadie (actual riding distance).

You will start drinking Pabst Blue Ribbon out of a can sitting on the sidewalk in front of convience stores while admiring your "track bike"

just say'n

Last edited by RichinPeoria; 02-22-09 at 06:43 AM.
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Old 02-21-09, 06:36 PM
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You will stop taking a bath and dodge soap

You will feel a need to dress like a kid from the 1920's
Check
Vintage roadies will yell at you when they see you chopped off the deraileur hanger from some vintage lugged steelie you turned into a "track bike"
Check
You will feel the need to have 2 pairs of toe straps on your clipped pedals
Check
You will eventaully put your head thru the rear windshield of a stopping/stopped car because you have no real brakes on your "track bike"
Not yet, but soon enough I'm sure
You will feel the need to put post cards in your spokes
I've felt the need, but my Mavic Ellipses won't allow it
You will end up with some hot young tatoo'ed girlfriend who doesnt shave (or shower)
I'm working on it
You will find your world very small compared to that of a roadie (actual riding distance).
The distance from my apt. to the furthest bar I drink at; 2.5 miles

You will start drinking Pabst or Blue Ribbon out of a can sitting on the sidewalk in front of convience stores while admiring your "track bike"
Check, Check, and Check
just say'n
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Old 02-21-09, 06:37 PM
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Originally Posted by cccorlew
55 years old and just made a fixed gear bike. It's fun. Not a replacement for the road bike, but definitely a different way to ride.
I'd say if you have a few extra bucks, do it. I'm enjoying the discipline of riding mine.
I do admit I ride it like a roadie in training, and not like a brakeless hipster. But I'm having fun on it.
I plan to commute on it, just cause, next year.

One of the nicest conversions I've seen. Well done.
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Old 02-21-09, 07:43 PM
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If you are going to pick up a fixed gear bike, I'd recommend making sure its a fixed gear road bike and not a track frame. It will fit you more like your current road bike and will be comfortable on long training rides.

I usually ride singlespeed, but both fixed and single speed are great for widening your powerband and improving supplesse. Once you've been training on a fixed gear for a while you'll be amazed at how quickly you can respond to attacks, bridge gaps, etc. without even shifting. It also forces you to attack the hills, which I find beneficial.

I usually run 52x17 for everyday riding and have a 15t fixed cog for when I'm going riding with the fast group ride (24-33mph).
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Old 02-21-09, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Basil Moss
Get a front brake, unless your macho image requires constantly running the risk of badly hurting yourself and/or an innocent bystander. I've seen this happen, it wasn't cool. If you want the workout of not using the brakes, guess what? Don't use them! They'll be there when a bus cuts you up, so you don't have to throw yourself onto the pavement and deck a little old lady trying to save your worthless hide (as I witnessed last year).
there goes your hipster cred
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Old 02-21-09, 08:57 PM
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Riding fixed is a blast but it is just another form of enjoying cycling. Not the be all to end all of riding.

My commuter is a salsa casserole I built up with a mix of new parts and items from a destroyed langster. The nice thing is that I can convert it to geared if I ever get sick of things.

No one will confuse me for a hipster....ever.
-Dressed like a roadie
-Full fenders and a rack
-Non velodrome gearing.
-Two brakes for when I flip it to SS.
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Old 02-23-09, 11:59 PM
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I asked a hipster in my spin class today if he rode (his fixie) with a brake... he simply laughed and walked away.
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Old 02-24-09, 02:16 AM
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Originally Posted by San Rensho
Unless you are getting a track bike for the track, don't do it. A fixed gear is in the wrong gear 95% of the time and you can't go around corners fast because of pedal strikes.

Only exception is to train on long straight stretches of untraveled roads, it does improve your spin and stregnth.
They are fun in certain circumstances but eventually one gets tired of going
slow. My folding bike will smoke any fixie rider in a town - hill situation.
If you really want to get strong, get a X-Mart, 26" wheeled, 45lb single speed
pee wee herman bike and do some hills a few times a week.
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Old 02-24-09, 02:21 AM
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A fixie is a great alternative, if you go on many rides shorter than 20 miles. If your only in the saddle for an hour you can man up, and not worry about having the perfect gear ratio at all times.

Just don't be a tool. Put breaks on it, and wear a helmet(not a saftey beanie).
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Old 02-24-09, 03:04 AM
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Originally Posted by captnfantastic
I asked a hipster in my spin class today if he rode (his fixie) with a brake... he simply laughed and walked away.
WTF was a hipster doing in a spin class?

make sure to buy him/her (who can tell with androgynous nature of the hipster) one of these

https://www.zazzle.com/give_hipsters_...16778979665398

riding without a brake is like saying that you trust traffic.
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Old 02-24-09, 03:33 AM
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Have fun. I'm slow at about 22 for my commute. I also ride in lycra for longer (40-60 miles) rides and mostly street clothes for commuting.

Enjoy!

and jonestr...I'm stealing your last line for a signature. Best thing I've heard in awhile!
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Old 02-24-09, 03:42 AM
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Originally Posted by -=Łem in Pa=-
They are fun in certain circumstances but eventually one gets tired of going
slow. My folding bike will smoke any fixie rider in a town - hill situation.
If you really want to get strong, get a X-Mart, 26" wheeled, 45lb single speed
pee wee herman bike and do some hills a few times a week.
What is this slow you speak of ?

Originally Posted by buzzedbiker
A fixie is a great alternative, if you go on many rides shorter than 20 miles. If your only in the saddle for an hour you can man up, and not worry about having the perfect gear ratio at all times.
I have several fixed gear bikes that are set up for touring and century rides...
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Old 02-24-09, 07:12 AM
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Originally Posted by captnfantastic
I asked a hipster in my spin class today if he rode (his fixie) with a brake... he simply laughed and walked away.
You can't flip it to a SS without brakes. Well you could but the results would be interesting.
I would ignore anything and everything hipsters have to say about .... well .... everything.
WTF was a hipster doing in a spin class?
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Old 02-24-09, 08:00 AM
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Rats

Foof. Gads. My fixie is store bought, has 35c tires, brakes and leather bar tape. Yes, my bars are too narrow. I wear corduroy pants with reflector cuff strap (or bib tights) and constantly plan but yet to do the 66 mile coffee loop. Instead of bunny hop, I snow plow until spring blossoms and derailleurs bloom.

I'm not a hipster am I? The guy at my LBS said I would be but I'm not.

Rats.
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Old 02-24-09, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver
What is this slow you speak of ?



I have several fixed gear bikes that are set up for touring and century rides...
My observations respectfully offered after a year of commuting on my beloved
Kilo TT, year 'round, in the hills of Vermont, the Killington ski area..........

1) In snow...fabulous you get some mad control.

2) Hills going up, no problem. Only had to walk twice, 44x17.
But , going down was absolutely painful. In my situation, 2 miles or so of downhills at
1/5 the speed you could be going on a freewheeler was a painful exercise in futility.

3) There is no way a fixer would be a good commuting unit in a urban area such
as where I live now. Too much stopping and dodging the worst/angriest drivers in the country.
If you have a 80" drive to take advantage of the flats here, you will not be keeping up
with the stop and go traffic. If you go 65" or so, you'll spin out at 22mph.

4) I disagree with the notion a fixie helps your spin. To me, its just the opposite.
A fixie sort of makes it own momentum just by going forward. Its easier to ride
long distances. If anything, you relax. It will get you in the habit of pedaling all
the time though....

Just one persons observations Ill get another one when I get into a better living
situation.
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