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Seems trying to find a training plan is harder than training

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Seems trying to find a training plan is harder than training

Old 05-04-09, 09:32 PM
  #26  
Aimulator64
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Originally Posted by Brian Ratliff View Post
Not at the OP's level of fitness. No need to be OCD right now, as long as the gist of "intervals, twice a week" is followed.
That does make alot of sense. After all im not a racer, so i personally do not know my own fitness levels yet
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Old 05-04-09, 10:13 PM
  #27  
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This is an AMAZING thread, thanks for this community!

Originally Posted by Brian Ratliff View Post
One last comment: you'll need something to monitor your progress is the point.

Seeing yourself get stronger week by week is part of the appeal of the interval set. Unless you have a powermeter, doing the intervals on flat terrain is harder. You can get a heartrate monitor and pick a heartrate to follow and you'll get the training benefit, but you won't be able to see your progress as easily (speed is variable by the wind, and your 20min heartrate won't change as you get more fit).

Distance up a hill gives you the training benefit and lets you see your progress in no uncertain terms. A trainer with a rear wheel speed sensor has the same benefit (power is proportional to speed on a trainer; as you get stronger, you'll get "faster"). A powermeter is the grand-daddy of all training tools, and priced accordingly, but gives you both benefits on any terrain.
I don't mean to hijack the thread, but I know nothing about powermeters or heartrate monitors, I just have a Cateye speedometer ... can you make some recommendations on power-meter products to help training? Unfortunately, my intervals will have to be on flats.

-Nico
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Old 05-04-09, 11:06 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by nasv View Post
This is an AMAZING thread, thanks for this community!
I thought so too. I need to start doing this.
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Old 05-05-09, 06:17 AM
  #29  
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If you're just now building fitness, I would recommend the training plan below. I feel like too many people recommend solo training to those who would benefit more from riding with fast groups. Maybe not Cat3+ but you should be able to find some fast rec & Cat4/5 riders out there.

Originally Posted by botto View Post
1. Find some group rides, fast group rides. Sit in the back.
2. Don't get discouraged if/when you get dropped from those group rides.
3. Go back the following week and do the fast group ride again.
4. If you're dropped a 2nd time, repeat steps 2 & 3
5. Once you're comfortable with the group and pace (and vice versa), take some pulls.
6. Once you're comfortable taking pulls, try some attacks (if it's that kind of group ride).
7. Once you're comfortable with steps 5 & 6, it's time to enter a race.
8. At your first race, repeat steps 1-6, but substitute 'race' for 'group ride'.[/INDENT]
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Old 05-05-09, 06:46 AM
  #30  
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I don't agree with much of the advice given above. Everyone is trying to give you the interval training program that they have come up with.

Why don't you spend $13 at Amazon and buy the ultimate interval training guide and learn how the pros do it.

http://www.amazon.com/Training-Racin...1527119&sr=8-1

This book teaches you about the 7 different training zones and how to design an interval training program to use each zone. It is based on a powermeter but you sure don't need a powermeter to do use these concepts (a heartrate monitor is necessary).

If you really want to learn how to ride faster and with more power, you have to take the time to educate yourself and then design a program for yourself. It took me a couple days to learn these concepts.

The original poster said that he rides 100-150 miles per week. You will find that if you ride more effectively, you can probably ride less time and still see more improvement.
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Old 05-05-09, 03:05 PM
  #31  
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because the books are doing the same thing people here are doing. There are alot of very experienced racers on this forum, and why buy a book written by a racer, describing their methods? its the same thing as a whole bunch of forum racers suggesting the same thing. Most people here would gladly help you discover your own way of training, rather than trying to follow a book. I find that instructional books leave little room for customization, but at least here, you get a whole lot of opinions and you can pick through the ones you like.
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Old 05-05-09, 04:19 PM
  #32  
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I have looked at many books and for the most part they're so freaking confusing. So when someone gives me a plan that says do intervals on these days and then long rides on those days it's easier to develope my own plan. It's even better when someone else says I should be riding with a fast group or riding just to ride or... These forums are way better than any book I've ever read because it's all sort of different fitness levels and even more training plans that I can pick and choose which one suits me best. Thanks to all the advice out there. Even the ones that say buy a book.
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Old 05-05-09, 04:41 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by cycle2death View Post
I've looked into this but I don't know if I'm at that point where I want to pay money for something that may not stick with me. Besides, I'm already living on rice and chicken as it is lol
DO THIS. http://www.training4cyclists.com/wintertraining.pdf and check out the rest of the site. The price is right up your alley. http://www.training4cyclists.com/
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Old 05-05-09, 05:00 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by The Carpenter View Post
DO THIS. http://www.training4cyclists.com/wintertraining.pdf and check out the rest of the site. The price is right up your alley. http://www.training4cyclists.com/
Definitely right up my price alley!!! Thanks for the site Carpenter. It looks like I may be able to just jump into the latter weeks I think. I'm already in decent cycling shape just don't think I'm able to keep up with the surges that I know I'll see in RR or crits. I'll mix and match maybe until I think I've found a happy medium somewhere. Anything's better than just riding to add up my miles at the end of the week at this point.
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Old 05-05-09, 05:01 PM
  #35  
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It's hard to say that you need to do 20 min intervals x amount of time y times a week without knowing where your fitness is.

Truth be told, most of the races that you can get into (atleast in this part of the country) are crits. The key to a crit (somewhat for cat.3 and def. for cat.4 and cat.5) is the first 10-12 min. If you can hang on until the first slow down in the field. You shouldn't have any troubles until the last 5-10 min.

During the first 10-12 min there will be alot of attacks, hard accelerations out every turn, and sustained high speeds on the flat and strait bits. You need to be comfortable with accelerating to ~30 mph( just a number to shoot for, to many variables and i dont have a powertap) time after time after time. I see alot of TT/Tri guys that can put out huge power over a long period of time (like the 20 min interval would give you) that are not able to handle the accelerations and spikes in power from a crit.

During the racing season i do the following training plan.
assuming that i had raced on sat. and Sunday
Monday- easy spin for an hour or 2. Do not put out power past where you feel it in your legs. If you feel the "burning feeling" back off.

Tuesday- Same as Monday, but the burning feeling should be harder to reach, so speeds may be higher than Monday

Wed/Thursday- Do one of the following on each day:
Sprint intervals- 30seconds on 30 seconds off. Do a set of 10 (or as many as you can) easy spin for ~10 min, and repeat.

Threshold work- Probably best to do on the trainer as you have more control of variables. A running workout that i had modified for cycling. 1min, 3min, 5min, 10min, 5min, 3min, 1min. Work as hard as you can, don't worry about the next set. up to equal recovery time between each interval, no more. do 2 times

Friday- easy spin

Race sat.
If not racing on sat, but you are racing on Sunday do not ride/ easy spin.

If not racing on the weekend at all, go for a long (>60 mi) at whatever pace you want.

Pre-race.
I see alot of people that do not do proper pre-race warm-up that really struggle early in the race.
Breakfast- 4-5 eggs with cheese. Anyway you like it. Crannberry juice and lots of water.
Or
French toast same for drinks

hop on the trainer
15-20 min of easy spin, just enough to break a sweat.
10 min tempo
5-10 min easy spin
2min threshold
2 min easy spin
1 or 2 1 min high cadence spins.

you should go through 1.5- 2 bottles of water during your warm-up

you should plan the warm-up to end 4-6 min before the race.

Last edited by enjoi; 05-05-09 at 05:11 PM.
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Old 05-05-09, 05:31 PM
  #36  
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"I have looked at many books and for the most part they're so freaking confusing."


Honestly, learning a zone training system is not rocket science if you just have a little motivation to learn. No one here (including you) has a clue what your strengths and weaknesses are or what specific training will benefit you the most.

For example, many of the posts above told you to do 2 x 20 min intervals which is fine but it only trains one zone and that might not even be the zone that you need the most work at.

The post by "enjoi" above is much better. It includes some work at some of the other zones.

It is kind of foolish to post here "please tell me what I should be doing because I am too lazy and confused to try to learn this on my own." It is much more useful to post "help me to learn how to design an effective training program." The posts that gave you some good references for learning would be your best asset if you were willing to work on it a little.

Last edited by jrobe; 05-05-09 at 05:34 PM.
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Old 05-05-09, 06:41 PM
  #37  
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My original post wasn't so much asking what training plan should I do but how others have deciphered what works for them. So far that's what I'm getting to read and it's great to see there are so many easy options out there to start at. I am confused as to what path I should take in my training but in no way am I lazy. I've read hundreds of posts here on BF and dozens of training plans. I know that there isn't an end-all say-all plan that one should start with when training to race. Seeing how others have made there plans based on experience and reading is a huge help and a bit of a confidence boost to see that it is easy. And I've already done what many people have suggested. I've scheduled my first race, found a fast paced group ride in the area, and just now got off a very intense interval session that was recommended to me. Thanks for the advice you gave.
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Old 05-05-09, 06:57 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by cycle2death View Post
Sounds awesome! This is exactly what I needed. I've just picked my race. It will be a 30 mile crit (5 laps of 6 miles) and now with a plan and a goal (staying in the pack without getting dropped) I'm pretty excited to start a real training plan. And to think I was just going to do my normal week of 150 miles of random pedaling lol.
Woah, 150 miles a week is more than I ride haha.

Depending on how long you've been doing that for, you should have a decent base already.

I've just started out doing the 2x20 intervals as well, and I'm wishing that I would have started earlier in the season...
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Old 05-05-09, 07:04 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
Woah, 150 miles a week is more than I ride haha.

Depending on how long you've been doing that for, you should have a decent base already.

I've just started out doing the 2x20 intervals as well, and I'm wishing that I would have started earlier in the season...
I'm a college student who only has to go to school twice a week. I love online courses!! I think this will be the last quarter I ever get to ride this much so I figure I might as well get as much out of it as I can. I was about to do the 2x20 on the trainer but that was for the birds. I did an interval someone else posted 5x (40 sec hard: 20 sec easy). I did that thing five times and wanted to throw up at the end. You guys who do this crap regularly are freaking crazy. Can't wait until thursday to do it again lol.
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