Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Bike Fitting

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Old 06-03-04, 07:02 PM
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newbiecyclist
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Bike Fitting

Ok, so I have been riding for a while now, and decided that a fitting from the LBS would be a good idea since I felt like I was losing a lot of energy from poor positioning.

As it turns out, I was correct. Almost everything was positioned incorrectly. Need a new handlebar and stem, and seat was set too far forward.

Only thing that we could not resolve from the fitting is my peddling action. My knees are working their way outward on the upstroke part of the pedaling action. I tried adjusting the cleats on the shoes so that I was pigeon toed to get my knees to stay straight, but it doesn't really help.

How do I get a nice straight piston motion in my legs?

Thanks for the words of wisdom....
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Old 06-03-04, 07:46 PM
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Bikes: Bike 1 - Bianchi 928, Easton carbon stem, bar & seat post, Ultegra 11/23 cassette. Bike 2 - 03 Lemond Buenos Aries. FSA compact crank, Sella Italia FSK sadle and Ultegra 12/27 cassette

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As far as I know you really can't DO anything to change your anatomy. Some of us ride with our knees in and straight (me) and others with legs sticking out like chickens. Oh, and the guy with the chicken style can still drop you like a bad hgabbit if he has the legs!!

Is your stoke smooth all (OK most) of the way through the pedaling cycle? If so, that is about the best you can hope for and will give you the most efficent use of your muscles (Don't forget to ankle).

Bill
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Old 06-04-04, 07:18 AM
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Thanks. So far I have no problem with getting dropped or not keeping up. I just want to make sure that I don't develop my knees inappropriately so that I start having problems down the road.

My pedaling is smooth all the way through the circle, so I am riding pretty efficiently. Working on the ankle action too....Thanks for the feedback.
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Old 06-04-04, 07:27 AM
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wlevey
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Bikes: Bike 1 - Bianchi 928, Easton carbon stem, bar & seat post, Ultegra 11/23 cassette. Bike 2 - 03 Lemond Buenos Aries. FSA compact crank, Sella Italia FSK sadle and Ultegra 12/27 cassette

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Originally Posted by newbiecyclist
Thanks. So far I have no problem with getting dropped or not keeping up. I just want to make sure that I don't develop my knees inappropriately so that I start having problems down the road.

My pedaling is smooth all the way through the circle, so I am riding pretty efficiently. Working on the ankle action too....Thanks for the feedback.
Ankling is important, but you should build up to it. Too much too soon and you will be very sorry!!

You may want to add a pedeling drill to some of your rides. Try this one. On a long flat section get into a comfortable gear and unclip one foot and kind of get it out of the way. keep pedeling with the one in the clip and try to maintain a steady cadence using the ankeling technique. After 30 seconds switch legs. Repeat four times. As you get better at it add more time and repeats. The exercise builds flexability and strenthons the mucle over your shin (I forget the name). Eventually you should be able to manage a steady and smooth 80-90 cadence with one leg. It isn't easy to do and will take practice, but it will definetely improve your stroke. This is a drill that our team coach has us do at least once a week.

Good luck and happy riding!!
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Old 06-04-04, 07:32 AM
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That's awesome. I train with Spinning throughout the winter, and we did something like that except we only disconnected mentally. Quite a different story with actually disconnecting I would assume.

I will give it a try!

Thanks.
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Old 06-04-04, 09:24 AM
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wlevey
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Originally Posted by newbiecyclist
That's awesome. I train with Spinning throughout the winter, and we did something like that except we only disconnected mentally. Quite a different story with actually disconnecting I would assume.

I will give it a try!

Thanks.
If you have a trainer you may want to try it on that first to get the feel of it. You are right, it is VERY different than just imagining you aren't using your one leg (because of course you still do a bit).

Happy spinning!!!!
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