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Power Grips vs Clipless Pedals vs Anything

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Power Grips vs Clipless Pedals vs Anything

Old 05-13-09, 11:02 PM
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Wyko
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Power Grips vs Clipless Pedals vs Anything

So, in order to get power on the upstroke as well as the down you need something attatch your foot to the pedal. Does a set of power grips actually work well enough?
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Old 05-14-09, 01:35 AM
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Well enough for what?

Don't forget your shoes. Stiff cycling shoes are noticeably more efficient than flexy sneakers.
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Old 05-14-09, 02:04 AM
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Id say power grips are slightly better than clips and straps (when then clips and straps and kept loose and never tightened down) because when you twist (straighten) your foot they tighten down.

But for best powertransfer, nothing really beats clipless shoes and pedals.
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Old 05-14-09, 07:17 AM
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Platforms with toe clips can work alright, but an issue with them is that they don't release perfectly in a crash which isn't good.
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Old 05-14-09, 11:48 AM
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Study after study after study have proven that "Pulling the pedal up" is a myth. Even the best pro riders are putting DOWNWARD pressure on the pedal that is rising from 6 o'clock to 12 o'clock. But, the best pro riders are putting only light pressure on the rising pedal, compared with the massive downward pressure of some new riders.

The myth of "pulling the pedal up" was created by a misunderstanding of what cycling is about. Many people wrongly assume a cyclist is "pumping" the pedals up and down, and many new riders in fact stomp on the pedals as if they are stomping grapes to make wine.

The truth is, a skilled cyclist is SPINNING the crank, not pumping. The best cyclist learn to spin at astoundingly high rates of 100 RPM when just cruising to 130 RPM or 140 RPM when sprinting. The ability to spin at high speeds is the key for successful pro riders.

To ride faster, you must spin the crank faster. The best pedal is the pedal that permits you to obtain and maintain the highest RPM rate over a wide variety of conditions (climbing, accelerating, riding in the rain). A BMX style pedal that firmly locks to the sole of your shoe will permit you to reach the highest RPM level your heart and lungs can sustain...the fact that a BMX pedal will work with virtually any rubber-soled or leather soled shoe made is a bonus.

So, all that is need is a pedal that "locks" your shoe to the pedal, even at a high RPM rate. Many commuters use BMX style pedals because a good BMX pedal will "lock" to any shoe, including a dress shoe with leather shoes. A skilled cyclist who can spin at 130 RPM with pro style racing pedals and also spin at 130 RPM with good BMX pedals and a pair of leather dress shoes.

Two disadvantages to BMX pedals: most of the good ones are heavy, and most cyclists have a phobia of adding weight to their bikes. Second, all the "cool guys" laugh if they see you riding an expensive road bike with BMX pedals...and you never want THAT to happen.

Last edited by Rustyoldbikes; 05-14-09 at 12:53 PM.
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Old 05-14-09, 11:55 AM
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I've seen the studies on pulling up ,and would basically agree with it, with a few exceptions, such as going all out accelerating up a steep grade, you definitely pull up.

However taking your spinning point, that involves pulling back , and pushing over. Without clipless pedals, or toeclips and cleats, you're not going to be able to "scrape the dog poop off your shoe" as effecitvely as you could with a system that locks you to the pedal.
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Old 05-14-09, 12:15 PM
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I tried powergrips. I give them about a 2/10. They crapped out pretty quickly and never really held my foot. Toe clips are much better IMO at about a 5/10. Ultimately, clipless pedals are the only way to go.
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Old 05-14-09, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Rustyoldbikes View Post
Study after study after study have proven that "Pulling the pedal up" is a myth. Even the best pro riders are putting DOWNWARD pressure on the pedal that is rising from 6 o'clock to 12 o'clock. But, the best pro riders are putting only light pressure on the rising pedal, compared with the massive downward pressure of some new riders.

The myth of "pulling the pedal up" was created by a misunderstanding of what cycling is about. Many people wrongly assume a cyclist is "pumping" the pedals up and down, and many new riders in fact stomp on the pedals as if they are stomping grapes to make wine.

The truth is, a skilled cyclist is SPINNING the crank, not pumping. The best cyclist learn to spin at astoundingly high rates of 100 RPM when just cruising to 130 RPM or 140 RPM when sprinting. The ability to spin at high speeds is the key for successful pro riders.

To ride faster, you must spin the crank faster. The best pedal is the pedal that permits you to obtain and maintain the highest RPM rate over a wide variety of conditions (climbing, accelerating, riding in the rain). A BMX style pedal that firmly locks to the sole of your shoe will permit you to reach the highest RPM level your heart and lungs can sustain...the fact that a BMX pedal will work with virtually any rubber-soled or leather soled shoe made is a bonus.

So, all that is need is a pedal that "locks" your shoe to the pedal, even at a high RPM rate. Many commuters use BMX style pedals because a good BMX pedal will "lock" to any shoe, including a dress shoe with leather shoes. A skilled cyclist who can spin at 130 RPM with pro style racing pedals and also spin at 130 RPM with good BMX pedals and a pair of leather dress shoes.

Two disadvantages to BMX pedals: most of the good ones are heavy, and most cyclists have a phobia of adding weight to their bikes. Second, all the "cool guys" laugh if they see you riding an expensive road bike with BMX pedals...and you never want THAT to happen.
are you bitter about something? sounds like you think you have all the answers, and anyone using true road pedals must be doing it to fit in with the crowd.

if bmx pedals were superior in any way on a road bike dont you think that at least one pro race team would be using them?
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Old 05-14-09, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Rustyoldbikes View Post
Study after study after study have proven that "Pulling the pedal up" is a myth. Even the best pro riders are putting DOWNWARD pressure on the pedal that is rising from 6 o'clock to 12 o'clock. But, the best pro riders are putting only light pressure on the rising pedal, compared with the massive downward pressure of some new riders.

The myth of "pulling the pedal up" was created by a misunderstanding of what cycling is about. Many people wrongly assume a cyclist is "pumping" the pedals up and down, and many new riders in fact stomp on the pedals as if they are stomping grapes to make wine.

The truth is, a skilled cyclist is SPINNING the crank, not pumping. The best cyclist learn to spin at astoundingly high rates of 100 RPM when just cruising to 130 RPM or 140 RPM when sprinting. The ability to spin at high speeds is the key for successful pro riders.

To ride faster, you must spin the crank faster. The best pedal is the pedal that permits you to obtain and maintain the highest RPM rate over a wide variety of conditions (climbing, accelerating, riding in the rain). A BMX style pedal that firmly locks to the sole of your shoe will permit you to reach the highest RPM level your heart and lungs can sustain...the fact that a BMX pedal will work with virtually any rubber-soled or leather soled shoe made is a bonus.

So, all that is need is a pedal that "locks" your shoe to the pedal, even at a high RPM rate. Many commuters use BMX style pedals because a good BMX pedal will "lock" to any shoe, including a dress shoe with leather shoes. A skilled cyclist who can spin at 130 RPM with pro style racing pedals and also spin at 130 RPM with good BMX pedals and a pair of leather dress shoes.

Two disadvantages to BMX pedals: most of the good ones are heavy, and most cyclists have a phobia of adding weight to their bikes. Second, all the "cool guys" laugh if they see you riding an expensive road bike with BMX pedals...and you never want THAT to happen.
ABH, is that you?
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Old 05-14-09, 03:16 PM
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Originally Posted by dcvelo View Post
ABH, is that you?
my thought exactly
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Old 05-14-09, 05:07 PM
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Most of the literature I have read suggests that a good portion of the pedal stoke should be a 'recovery phase' meaning that you won't apply power all the way around. My personal observations are that I do best when applying power over about 2/3 of the pedal stroke (from 10 o'clock to 6 o'clock seated and 12 o'clock to 8 o'clock standing) but that's me. Sprinting is another thing entirely.

This means that your foot must be firmly attached to the pedal, and if power grips accomplish that for you then they will function nearly as well as clipless pedals regardless of what percentage of the stroke you apply power.
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Old 05-14-09, 09:15 PM
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Originally Posted by dcvelo View Post
ABH, is that you?
Or Charles Vail, a guy who post/ed in the commuting forum and would come unglued when someone suggested clipless pedals for commuting.

As always, the OP or anyone, for that matter, will have to try both power grips and clipless pedals and decide which is "better" or, as it was said this time, "well enough".
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Old 05-14-09, 09:31 PM
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I actually liked the power grips and still have a couple of sets if your tooling around and want to walk into places they are great. you just need some stiff bottomed shoes, I always wore some low cut hiking shoes with them.. they will wear your shoes out so like clipless I had riding shoes, I never crashed to bad on them so no injuries.. they were on a 50/50 road / trail use hardtail mtb.

don't think I gained too much efficiency with these or clipless, but you never slip off the pedals or get bucked off by bumps.. they help you spin rather than mash.

They are fairly cheap if you don't like them you not out much.
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Old 05-14-09, 09:34 PM
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My wife uses PowerGrips on her MTB, clipless on her road bikes. I'm running clipless on all my bikes. I find I get much better power transmission clipless, and I can spin.
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Old 05-14-09, 10:26 PM
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Powergrips are good for keeping one's feet on the pedals when the weather is nasty. To improve power transmission they have to be set a little too snug for comfort. They don't really allow you to spin regardless of how you set them. They do allow you to lighten the load on the pedal a bit during the upstroke but they don't afford control in the entire rotation, just up and down.

Still better than nothing though.
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Old 05-14-09, 10:39 PM
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Toshi doubles are considered by most to be the best non-clipless option.
http://www.benscycle.net/index.php?m...1&currency=USD
They feel pretty awesome, but at that price you might as well get a decent set of clipless pedals.
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Old 05-14-09, 10:54 PM
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Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
my thought exactly
Originally Posted by dcvelo View Post
ABH, is that you?
Right you are.
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Old 05-14-09, 11:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Fat Boy View Post
I tried powergrips. I give them about a 2/10. They crapped out pretty quickly and never really held my foot. Toe clips are much better IMO at about a 5/10. Ultimately, clipless pedals are the only way to go.
I used Powergrips for a few years, after using toe clips for much longer. I preferred the Powergrips, but can't see why I would ever switch away from clipless pedals now.
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Old 05-15-09, 10:06 AM
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powergrips are perfect for noobs but nothing compares to clipless for power transfer i actually run powergrips on my mtb still ,you can use any shoes,you can get your foot out NOW and if you let anyone else ride your steed they can.-they are lightyears ahead of clips and straps
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Old 12-29-11, 04:00 PM
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Perfect for NOOBS?!!

Could you be any MORE judgmental?! How about perfect for anyone who doesn't want to be limited to one pair of shoes. I ride at home, I ride at work and I've been riding pretty regularly for about 30 years. Yes, I've tried clipless several different times and I liked them. I think clipless are a little bit better than Powergrips, maybe 9 out of 10 as compared to 7 out of 10 for pure performance/power transfer. However, there's an added inconvenience factor with clipless. If you leave your shoes at work, you can't make the club ride on Saturday. If you ride clipless, you can't wear your shoes inside without digging up a wood floor. If you need to track down your kids in the neighborhood, you have to go find your clipless shoes. With Powergrips there's really none of that. Only issue with Powergrips is if you adjust the straps to fit your cycling shoes (I use MTB shoes without cleats), they might be too tight to use with thicker running shoes (but not with Chucks if you have to). Bottom line is clipless IS better but not for everyone.
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Old 12-29-11, 04:03 PM
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Old 12-29-11, 05:18 PM
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Power grips are pretty cool. I've used them for a while until I moved on to SPD in my case. The release is quick and easy, sliding in isn't too hard... you miss putting your feet in than no big deal pedaling on the other side for a while...
There were 2 cons I noticed over time.
1) The fact the straps gets pulled by your upper and side of shoes... means some shoes won't be comfy and some shoes will wear out faster.
2) As I mentioned, while spinning without gripping your feet is possible... it happens too frequently that you fudge around putting your feet in.
Of course, it isn't as efficient as clipless but definitely will prevent most of slipping. (I used to use them with bicycle specific sneakers with stiffer insoles... so I can do apples/apples comparison on efficiency)
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Old 12-29-11, 10:53 PM
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I used power grips for 15 years and the worst thing I notest about them since moving on to a clipless system was the foot flex. This I mean when out of the saddle cranking is required the stiffness of a good road shoe is not there ( I used vans and changed about every 6 months to a new pair). This non stiffness and constant flex of your foot in both directions actually leads to foot problems including soreness and sprain. I was like most people thinking what difference could it possibly make going to a full clippless system. It was a huge difference in power transfer gain and now I keep them on the mountian bike and roll with speedplays on the road bike.
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