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Cannondale Synapse 4 - SRAM Rival with Mavic rims or 105/Ultegra Combo & Shimano Rims

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Cannondale Synapse 4 - SRAM Rival with Mavic rims or 105/Ultegra Combo & Shimano Rims

Old 08-02-09, 07:18 PM
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Rixtory
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Cannondale Synapse 4 - SRAM Rival with Mavic rims or 105/Ultegra Combo & Shimano Rims

I was looking at bikes at my local LBS and test riding them this weekend. I really like the Synapse 4 - There are two versions - One with the SRAM/Mavic and the other with the Shimano Combo.
Not looking to start a war, but could someone please tell me (If any) the Pros/Cons of either? I am coming from a 20+ year old 12 speed Shimano 105 grouping, so I have no learned habits either way.
I did notice the rear cassette on the SRAM has a 28Tooth gear which would help this 50 year old on hills. The Shimano set up goes to 25T.
also this comes with 32/50 double compact Crank - anybody know if I can add (or if it comes with) a triple crank?
Thanks - and if I am going for the long haul - Last bike for next 24 years - , should I consider full carbon, or Aluminum with Carbon forks and seat-post?
Weight isn't an issue as much as durability (and the fact that I have kids that could be around the bikes and drop them)
Thanks All....
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Old 08-02-09, 07:51 PM
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SRAM vs Shimano is something of a holy war here - I prefer SRAM, but certainly not all do. Try both.

Durability between aluminum and carbon is a whole 'nother war, probably more bitter than the SRAM/ Shimano one. Personally, I want titanium.
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Old 08-02-09, 08:13 PM
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Get rival, they have one at my LBS shop and it's very nice.
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Old 08-02-09, 08:23 PM
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A couple points to further confuse things --

The carbon fork and seatpost, I'll bet, aren't "full carbon" themselves. The fork would have an aluminum steerer tube (the part that goes through the frame's head tube), and the seatpost would be aluminum wrapped with a couple layers of carbon, mostly for aesthetics. There's a weight penalty for each, but the tradeoff is that you won't have to worry so much about overtorquing them.

SRAM and Shimano drivetrain parts are mostly interchangeable. You'd need to match the shifters and derailleurs (although they say that the front derailleurs work with either brand), but changing cassettes, front rings, and chains is fairly typical. I've got a Shimano 105 crank, Ultegra chain, and SRAM cassette, for example. That means that you don't have to be stuck with the 25T cassette on the Shimano bike.

Carbon vs. aluminum? They all last a long time. One point I didn't know until recently was that carbon can actually be repaired.

Right now, among my bikes, I've got cheap aluminum, nice aluminum, and decent steel. I'd get carbon or titanium for my next bike if for no other reason than to have something different (which further justifies an additional bike.. lol).
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