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Road Bike for fat old fart

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Road Bike for fat old fart

Old 07-12-04, 09:41 PM
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Road Bike for fat old fart

I am currently riding a Trek 820 MTB as I live on a gravel road. I am 51, 6'0" 225# and I generally ride 15 to 20 miles at 13mph. Back when I was a young man in the early 70's, I rode Flandria's, and frankly I miss that feeling of cutting loose. The Mtb is like peddling a sponge on pavement. At less than a Grand, what would be a good consideration for a heavy guy: don't want a comfort bike, but a bike I can lay down on and go fast.
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Old 07-12-04, 09:45 PM
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www.roadbikereview.com would be a start for ya. Have fun shopping & good luck!

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Old 07-12-04, 09:53 PM
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This would do it, no?

https://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...688082882&rd=1

Cycle Spectrum is a legit store front that will sell you any size in this bike, but you have to call a store location. Great price, great bike.
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Old 07-12-04, 10:00 PM
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Originally Posted by tourist
This would do it, no?

https://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...688082882&rd=1

Cycle Spectrum is a legit store front that will sell you any size in this bike, but you have to call a store location. Great price, great bike.
Man thats a long drive from Iowa. Didn't eat many chips, but spent my formative years in the early 70's
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Old 07-12-04, 10:04 PM
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Oops!! I didn't read the no shipping stuff.
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Old 07-12-04, 10:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Crazy-B
I am currently riding a Trek 820 MTB as I live on a gravel road. I am 51, 6'0" 225# and I generally ride 15 to 20 miles at 13mph. Back when I was a young man in the early 70's, I rode Flandria's, and frankly I miss that feeling of cutting loose. The Mtb is like peddling a sponge on pavement. At less than a Grand, what would be a good consideration for a heavy guy: don't want a comfort bike, but a bike I can lay down on and go fast.
Ride lots of bikes. You need something that is going to be a good geometry for you. At 51 you may not be as flexible as you were in the early 70s and an extremely aggressive racing frame may not work well for you. Fit is more important than ever. If you can bring your price range to around $1200, you really start to hit a sweet spot in the road bike market.

Do some research on fit and fit systems. Be educated so that when you talk to the salesman at the shop you get something that truly fits and isn't just "close enough" because they have it in stock. Back in the 70s, they would put you on the biggest bike you could stand over. Frankly, I still think that's more reasonable than the modern trend to smaller bikes as far as comfort is concerned.

I'd suggest trying a Trek 1200c, a Bianchi Eros, Specialized Sequoia, Specialized Roubaix (a little pricey, but worth a ride), maybe a Lemond Reno. See what else your LBS recommends.

Also bear in mind that at your weight, some of the ultra light wheelsets are just not going to be very durable. Watch out for low spoke count wheels.

You'll get recommendations here for carbon fiber this and ultra light that, but make sure you get something that won't hurt like hell or fall apart under you. Unless you're planning on joining the peloton, you don't need a racing bike, just a nice road bike.
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Old 07-12-04, 10:39 PM
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How about a Bianchi Volpe or the Specialized Sirrus?

The Trek 7700FX also seems like a good bike for you.
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Old 07-13-04, 08:34 AM
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Thanks everybody for the input. I will check out what the LBS has (mostly Trek and Giant I think). I plan on losing 30 or so pounds so I might wait till that happens and just work out on the MTB.
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Old 07-13-04, 09:30 AM
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Don't wait. I didn't, I'm 54 now and still fairly chunky. But I love my
bike, and it keeps me healthy.
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Old 07-13-04, 12:35 PM
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Ride the bike hard and the 30 will come off easier.
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Old 07-13-04, 01:13 PM
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I am 64, got my Lemond Road Bike (Buenos Aires) when I was 59. I have weighed between 210 and 245 during the past 6 years, and the road bike has faithfully carried me through about 8,500 miles witrh nary a hiccup - except for standard maintenance (chains, a chain ring or two and a cassette).

GET THE ROAD BIKE!

There is nothing like a road bike for that "svelte feeling."

A hybrid or mtn bike with slicks is just not the same. Like trying to change a jeep or SUV into a Corvette.

GET THE ROAD BIKE NOW, while you still have a lot of living in you. Don't wait until (whatever).

Get it fitted to you. I used a standard road bike fit until this year when I had the bars raised a little.

My road bike keeps my back stretched and in good shape, contrary to the apparent experience of some others.

GO GET THAT ROAD BIKE!

Oh, by the way - you are NOT old, and plese don't think of yourself that way. It is self-defeating. You may be fat, and a fart (I wouldn't know about that) but you definitely are NOT old!
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Old 07-13-04, 01:30 PM
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Crazy B,

Well, I've not done tons and tons of research but I have had the pleasure of trying several brands and models from Trek, Garry Fisher and Cannondale.

I'm 6'5 and at the time I purchased my last bike I was 280lbs. Now 220lbs. If it is one thing I realised through trying out all these bikes is how my own weight would demolish them in a matter of months and upkeep always seemed much more frequent than that of my friends and their bikes.

However, in 2002 I looked at and fell in love with a Cannondale Badboy Rigid. And I've been beating the crap out of it ever since and have hardly touched it in comparison to the other bikes I've had.

I ditched the mountain bike tires and put on some half decent puncture proofs (weight and all) and I've not had a flat since. When I first purchased it my second week going to work I had 3 flats. Being heavy really does have it effect I guess.

I used to find on the other models my wheels would always need to be straightened. When i bought the badboy it came with Mavics and have had no trouble at all. I've done about 17 miles a day for the past 2 years on this kit.

I also found when your heavy and riding on roads stay away from suspension bikes. Used to take so much of my energy and it was like riding on an old sofa. That is why I stuck with the rigid model. But you can get suspension aswell and an extra wheelset for offroading if thats also what your into as these bikes are supposed to be ok off road as well. I've never done it though.

My vote goes for the Badboy. Anyone else have any comments on this model for Crazy. I am interested as I've never spoken to another owner of one. And sorry for the long post but being my first one hey... I guess it's required.

I guess my favourite thing about this bike is it is kind of a hybrid between road bike and mountain bike. You sit on the bike as you would for a mountain bike but it handles like a road bike.. with the right tires. And lets face it. When your larger the last thing you want to do is be completley haunched over like a tour de france rider. Well atleast I didn't want to be.

Just my 2 cents. And the rigid model was only 700 pounds here in the UK which I think is about 1000 U.S.

Later..
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Old 07-13-04, 01:41 PM
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Ride bikes and try them out, of course... But this might be an option...

Rivendell RAMBOUILLET

https://www.rivbike.com/html/bikes_ra...letframes.html
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Old 07-13-04, 02:26 PM
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We have this question continually arising - "I am a bit overweight, what bike should I get?"

Then we have a plethora of responses, all the way from me (I got a standard road bike, had my wheels and spokes tension-relieved, and have ridden over 8,000 miles with absolutely NO problem) to other responses (The wheel fell apart with 3 days, or whatever - never get a road bike, get a 36 spoke militarily reinforced wheel custom built by an expert in wheel building) and all sorts of other responses in-between.

So, what is the difference? How come I (with weight between 210 - 245) can ride for over 8,000 miles on a standard factory wheel with nary a hitch and someone else's wheel falls apart in 3 miles or whatever?

Luck?

Riding terrain?

Tension relieving?

Other?

What is the difference?
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Old 07-13-04, 02:45 PM
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Check out the Bianchi Eros.
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Old 07-13-04, 04:33 PM
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You guys are right. I need to get a road bike. The MTB is a nice bike for me, but,, I like the old sofa comparison. I purchased it because I live on gravel and I didn't think I would have a use for a road bike. But it hasn't taken long to realise that they just don't cut it for me on pavement. One question though? does anybody ride a MTB for endurance training as it has more resistance, or is that counterproductive?
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Old 07-13-04, 04:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Crazy-B
You guys are right. I need to get a road bike. The MTB is a nice bike for me, but,, I like the old sofa comparison. I purchased it because I live on gravel and I didn't think I would have a use for a road bike. But it hasn't taken long to realise that they just don't cut it for me on pavement. One question though? does anybody ride a MTB for endurance training as it has more resistance, or is that counterproductive?
Believe me, you can get all the endurance training you want from a road bike.

"It never gets easier - you just go faster" - Lance Armstrong

Especially if you have any hills!
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Old 07-13-04, 05:04 PM
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Good point DnvrFox. I am going to keep the MTB for rides with the wife as she prefers gravel and dirt roads to pavement and cars. We live out in the sticks so there is plenty of gravel and dirt. I have never ridden a road bike on gravel. Is it feasible to ride one a mile to get to the nearest pavement?
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Old 07-13-04, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Crazy-B
Good point DnvrFox. I am going to keep the MTB for rides with the wife as she prefers gravel and dirt roads to pavement and cars. We live out in the sticks so there is plenty of gravel and dirt. I have never ridden a road bike on gravel. Is it feasible to ride one a mile to get to the nearest pavement?
Sure, depending on the characteristics of the "gravel." Sand is not such a hot thing to ride in with narrow tires. The Ride the Rockies has gone ovr Cottonwood Pass (gravel) several times and that is many miles of gravel with about 2,000 road bikes traveling it.

You might want to consider 700 x 25 tires rather than 700 x 23's, and Specialized Armadillos will serve you well for flat protection.

I also keep my mtn bike for gravel roads with the wife. We have mtn bike racks and panniers mounted to carry our picnics and stuff!
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Old 07-13-04, 06:13 PM
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I'm with DnvrFox, at 56 I got a Litespeed. amomg the BEST decisions I've ever made. Went from 212 to 192. Hang in there!!!!
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Old 07-13-04, 07:15 PM
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Hey crazy b what part of Iowa you from? NW part here.
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Old 07-14-04, 05:00 AM
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Originally Posted by oldspark
Hey crazy b what part of Iowa you from? NW part here.
Southeast.
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Old 07-14-04, 05:37 AM
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You might want to check out a cyclo cross bike. I am 54, 6' and 240-250. I looked at road, touring and 'cross bikes to find a combination of fit, storng frame, strong wheels, capability on roads and gravel, manueverability. I purchaseed a steel Surly Cross Check and have been very happy with it. I have only ridden my mountain bike once since the purchase (when the cross check was in the shop for repair).
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Old 07-14-04, 06:22 AM
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Put the Trek 1200c on your list of bikes to check out, also maybe the x-o1.
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Old 07-14-04, 07:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Grampy™
Put the Trek 1200c on your list of bikes to check out, also maybe the x-o1.
I'm gonna check out Treks today.
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