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is there a technique to keep pedaling to get a slipped chain back on front chainring?

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is there a technique to keep pedaling to get a slipped chain back on front chainring?

Old 09-07-09, 09:50 PM
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is there a technique to keep pedaling to get a slipped chain back on front chainring?

Usually when I've seen a chain come off the front chainring, the cyclist has to stop to reinstall the chain. But several times now I've seen a cyclist simply keep pedaling and the chain (which was completely off and flopping around) somehow finds its way back onto the chainring. Is this purely happenstance, or is there an actual technique to this?
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Old 09-07-09, 09:55 PM
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As one of the guys at work would yell,

"Shift! Shift, dang it!"

As long as it didn't get wedged against the chainstay, it can be "lifted" with the front derailleur back onto the chainrings. Don't pedal with too much force, though, while attempting to shift to the big ring.

If it fell off to the outside, odds are it'll come back on by itself, helped greatly by the crank arm and the small pin it should have that blocks the gap between the crank arm and the chainring.
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Old 09-07-09, 09:59 PM
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if you overshift off the front, you can pedal backwards until the chain catches a tooth, then pedal forward to correct.
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Old 09-07-09, 10:01 PM
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Soft pedal and use the derailleur.

If it's off the outside, shift to the small ring and pedal slowly.

If it's off the inside, shift to the big ring and pedal slowly.
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Old 09-08-09, 12:40 AM
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I don't like to risk scratching my frame or crank especially since it makes no difference if my ride takes 5 minutes longer.
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Old 09-08-09, 04:10 AM
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I can get it back on 80% of the time. I usually keep trying until I slow down to the point of falling over. I hate when it happens on an upslope though. Usually it's caused when there's a quick transition from a downslope to a steep upslope, and I make the mistake of trying to shift the front and the back at the same time.

Don't know why I keep doing that...
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Old 09-08-09, 04:14 AM
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Originally Posted by JimF22003
I can get it back on 80% of the time. I usually keep trying until I slow down to the point of falling over. I hate when it happens on an upslope though. Usually it's caused when there's a quick transition from a downslope to a steep upslope, and I make the mistake of trying to shift the front and the back at the same time.
Don't know why I keep doing that...
Nothing wrong with doing that ... you need to adjust your FD a bit.
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Old 09-08-09, 08:32 AM
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I dropped a chain @ 40mph on a rough decent in a race. Started pedalling and felt no resistance. It sort of freaked me out but I shifted the FD to the small ring and soft pedalled until the chain caught back on. Thankfully, I knew the drill from mountain biking. It becomes instinct after a few dropped chains.
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Old 09-08-09, 09:04 AM
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shift the front derailler to put the chain back where you want it.
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Old 09-08-09, 11:27 AM
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Use one of these chain drop devices and it will never be an issue again. I haven't had a chain drop in 5 yrs. I make my own.

https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...light=dog+fang
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Old 09-08-09, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by bikeresque
I don't like to risk scratching my frame or crank especially since it makes no difference if my ride takes 5 minutes longer.
In a race or fast group ride, 5 minutes is an eternity. Nobody waits.

The key is to use your front derailleur as your "fingers" and soft pedal. If the chain gets jammed up somewhere, don't keep pedaling - your legs can apply a lot of force to the chain; you'll end up breaking something.

Otherwise, the most common chain drop for me is to the inside, and I just shift to the big ring while pedaling to get the chain back on. I've done this on pretty steep hills too. And in the middle of a big pack in the middle of a race. Inconvenient, of course, but better than drifting to the back of the pack, stopping, getting off, putting the chain back on, getting back on, and spending the rest of the race in a (most probably) fruitless chase to get back to the pack.

If you are losing your chain more than once in a blue moon, you should look at your derailleur adjustment. When you are in your small ring and largest cog, you should have no more than a penny's width of space between the chain and the derailleur plate. Same on the outside in the big ring and smallest cog.
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Old 09-08-09, 01:00 PM
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Originally Posted by jrobe
Use one of these chain drop devices and it will never be an issue again. I haven't had a chain drop in 5 yrs. I make my own.

https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...light=dog+fang
+1
Put one of these on my old bike and never dropped another chain.
Now I just need to figure out how to mount one on the cervelo.

Last edited by Fixitman; 09-08-09 at 01:33 PM.
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Old 09-08-09, 01:05 PM
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Speaking from experience... this is a FANTASTIC way to absolutely chew up your right chain stay, you should see my crit bike's chain stay, looks like I went at it with a hammer and chisel.
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Old 09-08-09, 02:23 PM
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Originally Posted by bikeresque
I don't like to risk scratching my frame or crank especially since it makes no difference if my ride takes 5 minutes longer.
+1 I've put way too much time and money in my bike. Why does it matter if you get dropped from a group?
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Old 09-08-09, 03:10 PM
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My mechanic tells me that a dropped chain means the front dr is not adjusted correctly. I use to drop the chain all the time until I changed mechanics and now it hasn't happened in more than a year.

You could also put something like a Third Eye Chain Watcher on your bike which will stop the chain from dropping.
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Old 09-08-09, 03:30 PM
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It's usually a FD adjustment issue, but I also had it happen with a different crankset. Whether it was the crank or BB, something would let the chainrings wobble under load, and I could drop the chain -- usually to the outside -- almost at will. This was even with the FD adjusted within a hair's breadth of the chain in both the big-small and small-big combinations.

Swapped to a better crank and BB, and I can't remember when I dropped a chain with the new setup.

But anyway, +1 to checking the FD adjustment first, and second & third.
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Old 09-08-09, 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by fauxto nick
Speaking from experience... this is a FANTASTIC way to absolutely chew up your right chain stay, you should see my crit bike's chain stay, looks like I went at it with a hammer and chisel.
that's not from dropping chains or putting them back on with the front derailler. that is from the chain slapping the stay when you hit bumps (and is worse when you ride in the little little combo a lot). use a clear film protector to avoid that. I have a 2006 aluminum cannondale and there are barely any marks.
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Old 09-08-09, 03:56 PM
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I'd rather just pull over to fix it than risk crashing into something while looking down and really break something.
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Old 09-08-09, 05:30 PM
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Originally Posted by bigtea
+1 I've put way too much time and money in my bike. Why does it matter if you get dropped from a group?
Because no one likes getting dropped and the fix can easily be done on the fly.
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Old 09-08-09, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by jrobe
Use one of these chain drop devices and it will never be an issue again. I haven't had a chain drop in 5 yrs. I make my own.

https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...light=dog+fang
can you share how you make your own?
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Old 09-08-09, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Jynx
that's not from dropping chains or putting them back on with the front derailler. that is from the chain slapping the stay when you hit bumps (and is worse when you ride in the little little combo a lot). use a clear film protector to avoid that. I have a 2006 aluminum cannondale and there are barely any marks.
No dude... this is from me dropping a chain during intervals and stepping on the pedal with all my weight and sandwiching it between the chain stay and the small ring. Trust me.
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Old 09-08-09, 05:38 PM
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I find that if I drop a chain to the inside of a Campy drivetrain, I can't pick it up. This is with Campy front der or some older Shimano front der.

Seems that for Shimano drivetrain, I can. I don't know why there's a difference.

Since I use Campy, and I'd like to have a zero chance of dropping a chain, I use the N-Gear jumpstop, I think it's the best one out there. Only negative is that it's only for round seat tubes.

https://sprinterdellacasa.blogspot.co...-jumpstop.html

There is that aluminum bar thing too, someone did something like that for pros and has them here on BF somewhere.

cdr
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Old 09-08-09, 05:52 PM
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It's rare to have it drop, but the chain usually picks up just fine with a spot of shifter work.
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Old 09-08-09, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Nachoman
Because no one likes getting dropped and the fix can easily be done on the fly.
I don't think you are speaking for everyone...please rephrase that to be "Because I, for one, don't like getting dropped..." There are a lot of road cyclists who really don't care.
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Old 09-08-09, 07:08 PM
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Point taken. I don't like getting dropped. (Even though it happens all the time).
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