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Looking for a LBS to assemble a new bike - How much should I pay?

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Looking for a LBS to assemble a new bike - How much should I pay?

Old 06-05-10, 04:30 PM
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993guy
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Looking for a LBS to assemble a new bike - How much should I pay?

I've been collecting parts for a new road bike and once I get my new component set in the mail, I will be ready to have it built.

I could probably fumble my way through it, and at one point convinced myself to try, but am now set on having it done once and done right.

I will be looking up the local shops in the next few weeks but wanted to get a feeling on what I should expect to pay for a shop to assemble the BB/crank, shifters, derailleurs, and adjust the cables.

My build specs., for those who are interested are as follows:

Specialized Tarmac SL2 frame/fork (2009 World Champion edition)

Easton WCS Stem

Specialized Pro SL Bars

Selle San Marco Magma saddle

Full Dura-Ace 7900 Group set

Mavic Ksyrium SL wheels

Feedback would be most appreciated!

Last edited by 993guy; 06-05-10 at 06:17 PM.
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Old 06-05-10, 04:39 PM
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$100-150ish seems to be the going rate here.

Or see if any of your LBS' do the Park Tool School. The course isn't much more money than it would cost you to pay a shop to build up your bike... but you get the added benefit of completing your build with the assistance of the shop mechanic/instructor and you will learn how to do all of your own wrenching.

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Old 06-05-10, 04:41 PM
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Edonis13
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pick this up and do it yourself.

http://www.velopress.com/maintenance.php?id=283
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Old 06-05-10, 04:55 PM
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billyymc
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Why would you not want to learn to do it yourself? Despite the assertions of some here, it ain't rocket science. If I can learn to do it, anyone can. I pretty much learn by taking stuff apart, seeing how it works, then figuring out why it isn't working right. Building a bike from new parts is pretty darn easy -- assuming you have the RIGHT parts.
 
Old 06-05-10, 05:23 PM
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Farby
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I paid 150ish for an assembly 2 years ago. I wanted to do the assembly myself but for what i spent on parts and a frame, i figured the xtra 150 was money well spent to make sure it was done correctly by a pro in a day or two so i could be out riding it. All the tools needed are expensive too. I agree anybody can learn to do it thought and i have since learned a lot on a less expensive bike, but still not a full assembly.
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Old 06-05-10, 05:31 PM
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grymg
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give a person a fish and he'll eat for a day, teach him how to fish and he'll eat for a lifetime. . . .

Personally I would go to the LBS for the operations I couldn't do without expensive tools, like a crown race install or BB installation torque, or maybe sawing the fork steerer. But really you should do it all yourself.
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Old 06-05-10, 05:41 PM
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993guy
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I would like to do it myself but can't justify the cost of the tools. Also, I'd prefer not to screw up my spendy bike on a first attempt.

I'll do as much as I feel capable of doing on my own.
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Old 06-05-10, 05:58 PM
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Originally Posted by billyymc View Post
Why would you not want to learn to do it yourself? Despite the assertions of some here, it ain't rocket science. If I can learn to do it, anyone can. I pretty much learn by taking stuff apart, seeing how it works, then figuring out why it isn't working right. Building a bike from new parts is pretty darn easy -- assuming you have the RIGHT parts.
Who asserted any such thing?
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Old 06-05-10, 06:19 PM
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gustin18
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It already seems to be the general consensus, but anyone who spends this kind of money on a bike should know how it works inside and out. My shop would probably charge from $75 to $100 but if you wanted to schedule a time when we could work on the bike and talk/teach you through it, we could totally do that! See if your LBS will do the same...
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Old 06-05-10, 06:23 PM
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Oh yes... it's gonna be sweet!

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Old 06-05-10, 06:25 PM
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The cost will be minimal compared to amount you blew on that DVD collection.
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Old 06-05-10, 06:27 PM
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i paid 160, couldnt be more satisfied.....then again, that was a TRi bike i had done. regardless....i loved it.
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Old 06-05-10, 07:07 PM
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I was going to say that it's nice to have someone who knows what they are doing when dealing with setting internal headset bearings, possibly bottom bracket bearings, trimming fork steers.. but I see none of that applies here. Really all you have left that requires special tools is a bottom bracket tool and a cassette tool. Maybe also get a cable cutter. You won't be wasting money on those tools at all.. I use all three of those tools all of the time, and the knowledge you'll acquire in the process is irreplaceable. Then again the first bike I built up I paid to have it done. The next 4 I did myself.
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Old 06-05-10, 09:59 PM
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Originally Posted by crimsonblood View Post
I was going to say that it's nice to have someone who knows what they are doing when dealing with setting internal headset bearings, possibly bottom bracket bearings, trimming fork steers.. but I see none of that applies here. Really all you have left that requires special tools is a bottom bracket tool and a cassette tool. Maybe also get a cable cutter. You won't be wasting money on those tools at all.. I use all three of those tools all of the time, and the knowledge you'll acquire in the process is irreplaceable. Then again the first bike I built up I paid to have it done. The next 4 I did myself.
Yeah, and you're talking about $25 worth of tools there...
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Old 06-05-10, 09:59 PM
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$150 in san diego.
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Old 06-06-10, 05:06 AM
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Originally Posted by grymg View Post
give a person a fish and he'll eat for a day, teach him how to fish and he'll eat for a lifetime. . . .

Personally I would go to the LBS for the operations I couldn't do without expensive tools, like a crown race install or BB installation torque, or maybe sawing the fork steerer. But really you should do it all yourself.
^ this

Get your LBS to do the thing you don't have the tools to do properly.
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Old 06-06-10, 05:29 AM
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Originally Posted by MegaTom View Post
Who asserted any such thing?
Sorry MT - didnt' mean in this particular thread. But if the OP has read/searched BF at all -- t here are some folks here who seem to want to convince people that building/working on a bike is too hard for an amateur.
 
Old 06-06-10, 12:03 PM
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OK, so if I were to assemble it myself, what specialty tools would I need? I already have the cassette tools. I presume a BB wrench... what else?
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Old 06-06-10, 12:08 PM
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I should also note, I already have a whole assortment of allen wrenches, torque wrenches in in/lbs and ft/lbs, snap-ring compressors, TIG welder, and a Sawzall. So, I've got the basics...
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Old 06-06-10, 12:20 PM
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Whatever the bill is at the end. When you go to a bike shop for labor just hold your breath and let them pound your ars for a while, and try and not cry about it.
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Old 06-06-10, 12:56 PM
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I assembled my last bike with the help of my friend and LBS owner. After the shop closed, we stayed behind had some pizza, a couple of beers and a few hours later we were done.

He wouldn't take any money so I came back next day with a $200 gift certificate to a local restaurant.
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Old 06-06-10, 01:04 PM
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I pulled all the cables, installed everything then asked them to go over it (needed a torque wrench and headset press)
Cost me $50 plus case of premium beer.
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Old 06-06-10, 02:05 PM
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Originally Posted by jdon View Post
I assembled my last bike with the help of my friend and LBS owner. After the shop closed, we stayed behind had some pizza, a couple of beers and a few hours later we were done.

He wouldn't take any money so I came back next day with a $200 gift certificate to a local restaurant.
This sounds like a great idea. $200 plus pizza and beer and have them teach you how to do it.
1) you will learn how to assemble it and how it works
2) you will be taught by someone who has done this countless times
3) The assembly will be done under the supervision of a bike mechanic.

WIN. WIN. WIN.
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Old 06-06-10, 03:21 PM
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All you really need is a bottom bracket tool, chain tool, allen wrenches and some cable cutters will make your life much easier. Go to Parktool website and follow the instructions there, its actually alot easier to build than you might thing.

fyi, your seatpost clamp appears to be on backwards
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Old 06-06-10, 04:00 PM
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Actually I keep it reversed so I can easily differentiate my bike from other SL2's in the Starbucks parking lot.

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