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Tubular/ Clincher wheel question

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Tubular/ Clincher wheel question

Old 09-08-04, 09:11 PM
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The_Convert
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Tubular/ Clincher wheel question

What are the pros/ cons of each? Tubulars you actually have to glue?
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Old 09-08-04, 09:15 PM
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Tubulars have a great ride quality but can be more expensive than a comparable clincher and YES they do have to be glued on. In emergency you can ride it flat but it's not fun.

Clinchers come in a lot more varieties, are less expensive, easier to fix, and the technology has improved the ride quality a lot with better quality casings, etc.
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Old 09-08-04, 09:36 PM
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Sew-ups (tubulars) are a savings in weight of epic proportions, because the tube is absent and the rim is much lighter. I read where every ounce of weight shaved from a wheel equates to about a pound of weight shaved from the frame-- quite signifigant. Lighter rims accelerate more quickly as well.

Dave
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Old 09-08-04, 09:39 PM
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tubs-light, fast, expensive, messy, hard to repair.
clinchers-heavier, cheap, minimal performance difference for most people, easy to repair.
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Old 09-08-04, 09:42 PM
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Originally Posted by bunabayashi
Sew-ups (tubulars) are a savings in weight of epic proportions, because the tube is absent and the rim is much lighter. I read where every ounce of weight shaved from a wheel equates to about a pound of weight shaved from the frame-- quite signifigant. Lighter rims accelerate more quickly as well.

Dave
16x the benefit would be way too high. I'd imagine it's somewhere about 4x as good.
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Old 09-08-04, 09:45 PM
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If I recall it was one of the USA Cycling guys.

Dave
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Old 09-09-04, 07:54 AM
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If you are racing, get a set of tubulars, It's good to have a spare set of wheels anyways. Don't worry about the expense of getting flats, or the hassle of trying to repair the tubulars. Just throw them out. If you are only using them for race day, you will be surprised at their longevity. Plus if and when they do flat, it's usually a slow softening of the tire, not the explosive bang of a clincher. The slow softening is safer and gives you much more time to react etc..

Get some Tufo's and use the available sealant, it works great. It seals punctures up to 2mm and usually with little or no air loss. You won't even know it happened until you see a tiny spot of sealant on the tread after the ride.


I wouldn't recommend training or everyday use, due to the cost. But come race day, there is nothing better.
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Old 09-09-04, 08:49 AM
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I REALLY like riding on my American Classic wheels with Vittoria Open Corsa CX tubulars mounted on them. The ride quality and handling are much better than my other (clincher) wheels/tires. It's very surprising just how much better they feel.

As has been stated, they are a pain to deal with at changing time, and very expensive. But I'll ride them as long as I can afford it, and am strong enough to change them.
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Old 09-09-04, 09:38 AM
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I had been riding tubulars for years, as my clincher wheels had become unrideable. While the tubulars had always gave a better ride against the old clinchers, especially with silk tires, they were a pain in the butt, between the repair, the glue and the cost.

I've recently bought a new pair of lightweight clincher wheels, put on GP3000 tires, and would never go back to sew-ups. This new stuff is so much better.
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Old 09-09-04, 10:34 AM
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Once you ride sew-ups you'll be bummed every time you put the clinchers back on.
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Old 09-09-04, 11:09 AM
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I would stick to clinchers. Sew-ups are a speciality anymore, as you have to learn how to glue them on, clean them while you are riding (although they now have kevlar to help), and you will never notice the difference if you don't get them. You can carry three tubes with you whereas you usually carry only one tubular.
Unless you race, which you can still do on Vittoria Opens (clinchers), the investment is too great to justify.
Unless you are riding a classic, retro bike and have always ridden sew-ups, which isn't the case...
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Old 09-09-04, 12:06 PM
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Merton,

what in the hell are you talking about?
show me a clincher that I can pump up to 220psi.
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Old 09-09-04, 12:18 PM
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Merton thinks that Beloki crashed in the tour becuase he was riding a tubular, hey guess what, so was Lance right behind him, and Vino a ways in front of him. He slipped on the melting tar, highsided, and when he came back down the sideways force rolled the tubular off the rim. Im pretty sure any clincher would have been ripped off as well. The fact that they flat slower, and even when completely flat, you can ride around corners on them, more than makes them safer than clinchers. Tufo makes a tape in two strengths, and the stronger is so strong, that it will cause the cotton base tape to tear when removing a cheap tubular. So that stuff is not going to fail you.

Most of these "you'll put your eye out kid" types have never ridden tubulars. And they don't know anyone who has rolled one, they've just heard about so and so's older brothers, ex girlfriends, former roomates nephew who rolled one.

I've seen plenty of clichers blow off of rims, and I've seen plenty of explosive clincher flats on a packed descent, or going full gas into a corner to never want to race on clinchers.
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Old 09-09-04, 01:28 PM
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So, if i am planning to race, what would be a good set of tubulars to get? Zipp 303's seem pretty good. I love the Lightweight brand wheels but $5,500 is a little hard to swallow. haha
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Old 09-09-04, 01:29 PM
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How much do you weigh?
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Old 09-09-04, 01:45 PM
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I weight 160
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Old 09-09-04, 01:45 PM
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lol -t
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