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Glove and pants for wet and cold rides

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Glove and pants for wet and cold rides

Old 11-20-10, 12:29 PM
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Glove and pants for wet and cold rides

Let's get this out of the way first: I am one of those California wusses.

I went for a ride this morning and it was pouring and 45F. I like riding in the rain, but my gloves quickly got soaked and my fingers started aching. And my shorts and knee warmers also got soaked.

Please recommend gloves with decent insulation and water resistance. Also, I'd appreciate advice on decent rain pants. The ones I use for running in the rain are too baggy.

Thanks for your help,

Cliff
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Old 11-20-10, 03:00 PM
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If you want to keep your extremities warm, keep your core warm. Cover up on your body; no amount of insulation on your hands and feet will help if there is no blood flowing to them.

I tend to use a lot of wool stuff these days on wet, cold rides. Wool jerseys, arm warmers, knee warmers, socks and gloves... all good stuff. Seems to be a trend here in the PNW. I don't wear rain pants or waterproof gloves, just a jacket or vest. The rest of my body just gets wet. And, FWIW, I have tried waterproof gloves and they suck for athletic activities. Your hands get nasty and clammy.
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Old 11-20-10, 03:06 PM
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I should add: for gloves, I wear the wool version of the ones offered by Defeet. I don't wear rain pants, just leg warmers or knee warmers (depending on how cold it is). Leg warmers are pearl izumi; knee warmers are wool Defeets.
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Old 11-20-10, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian Ratliff
If you want to keep your extremities warm, keep your core warm. Cover up on your body; no amount of insulation on your hands and feet will help if there is no blood flowing to them.

I tend to use a lot of wool stuff these days on wet, cold rides. Wool jerseys, arm warmers, knee warmers, socks and gloves... all good stuff. Seems to be a trend here in the PNW. I don't wear rain pants or waterproof gloves, just a jacket or vest. The rest of my body just gets wet. And, FWIW, I have tried waterproof gloves and they suck for athletic activities. Your hands get nasty and clammy.
+1111. Wool Rocks. I rode this week 44 degree temp's , strong wind and rain , soaked. Still warm with wool shorts, leg warmers and long sleeve jersey. Layer up with wool, as stated above, if your core is warm everything else follows.
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Old 11-20-10, 03:16 PM
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I like my cheap Performance rain pants just fine. I usually wear them over knickers so they don't feel that clammy against my skin.
I too am looking for waterproof gloves. I tried ski gloves, but even sprayed with water-resistant spray they get soaked.
No matter what other folks say, even with a warm core, wet cold hands suck. I don't see how soggy wool would do a darn bit of good. It would be like a cars radiator, making sure the wind kept your soggy wet gloves extra cold and freezing your fingers.
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Old 11-20-10, 04:08 PM
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IME when it's raining hard, you're going to get wet. Through and through. No matter what you wear.

Keep the wind off, and wear wool.

For a hard 45F rain I'd probably be wearing:

1. Rain cover on helmet
2. Good water-resistant gloves - my current pair are Gore Bike Wear.
3. Wool base layer
4. Rain shell (IIRC it's a Sugoi Helium one)
5. Bib shorts
6. Tights
7. Wool socks
8. Either winter MTB shoes (if I want to bother changing my pedals out to SPDs) or shoe covers over my road shoes.

Shoe covers only keep the water out for a while - I get at most 1/2 an hour or so before water seeps in through the cleat holes and my feet are in their own private little puddles inside my shoes. Which is why I wear wool socks - your feet will still be warm despite being wet. If it's colder than 45F I'd almost certainly swap out the pedals for SPDs so I could wear my winter MTB shoes for longer rides - they'll keep my feet pretty dry since their one-piece design doesn't let water in through the cleat holes.

Even with fenders the longest I can keep my feet dry is maybe an hour with shoe covers - the fenders definitely cut out most of the spray, but eventually the water gets in anyway.

FWIW, I've done 3-4 hours rides in 35F rain.
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Old 11-20-10, 04:41 PM
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I love wool but you need to accept its' limitations. I wear a wool jersey underneath a synthetic if it is cold, because the wool sags too much. I have wool knee warmers, but I hesitate to use them in the rain because they get heavy and sag.

In that case, you're going to get wet anyway so just get something comfortable between your skin and the rain and keep your core warm--as has been said. What annoys me most in the cold are wet feet, but that is what neoprene is for.

Wool socks are a must though. I love wool socks.
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Old 11-20-10, 04:51 PM
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Curious - why cycle in the rain? Your braking is the pits, you can't see much and cars are a danger. Why not just put the thing on a stationary trainer and wait for a better day? When I got caught in the rain in Manhattan (once) I nearly got killed several times over just trying to get back home.

Essex
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Old 11-20-10, 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Essex
Curious - why cycle in the rain? Your braking is the pits, you can't see much and cars are a danger. Why not just put the thing on a stationary trainer and wait for a better day? When I got caught in the rain in Manhattan (once) I nearly got killed several times over just trying to get back home.

Essex
Almost got hit in the rain? How many lights were you running on your bike?

And in a hard 35F rain, any MUP or bike trail is pretty much all yours. Miles and miles of nobody.
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Old 11-20-10, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by achoo
Almost got hit in the rain? How many lights were you running on your bike?

And in a hard 35F rain, any MUP or bike trail is pretty much all yours. Miles and miles of nobody.
No lights. I got caught in a surprise thunderstorm. Shoulda' just jumped in a cab except they were all taken!

I can understand the beauty in having no one around.

Cheers,

Essex
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Old 11-20-10, 05:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Essex
Curious - why cycle in the rain? Your braking is the pits, you can't see much and cars are a danger. Why not just put the thing on a stationary trainer and wait for a better day? When I got caught in the rain in Manhattan (once) I nearly got killed several times over just trying to get back home.

Essex
I find trainers extremely boring and I just won't use them. Also, as I said, I enjoy riding in the rain. There's almost no traffic on the roads that I pick so it's very quiet and peaceful. Just me and the elements.
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Old 11-20-10, 08:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Essex
Curious - why cycle in the rain? Your braking is the pits, you can't see much and cars are a danger. Why not just put the thing on a stationary trainer and wait for a better day? When I got caught in the rain in Manhattan (once) I nearly got killed several times over just trying to get back home.

Essex
Riding in the rain has it's own pleasure- the smells, sounds and sights are all different in the rain. If it's coming down in buckets when I would start I hold off. If it is threatening to rain I ride- have missed too many good rides waiting for rain that never showed. If it's a light to moderate rain I ride. I'm going to get wet anyhow when I get back for a bath.
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Old 11-20-10, 11:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Essex
Curious - why cycle in the rain? Your braking is the pits, you can't see much and cars are a danger. Why not just put the thing on a stationary trainer and wait for a better day? When I got caught in the rain in Manhattan (once) I nearly got killed several times over just trying to get back home.

Essex
Out of the last three weeks, I've trained 5 days a week and have been outside twice. There are limits to how many hours you can ride indoors before you go ape-sh|t crazy.

And, to deal with the cars, you don't ride in the city, you find quiet country roads to ride on and choose a really bright tail light.
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Old 11-20-10, 11:38 PM
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Originally Posted by achoo
...
Shoe covers only keep the water out for a while - I get at most 1/2 an hour or so before water seeps in through the cleat holes and my feet are in their own private little puddles inside my shoes. Which is why I wear wool socks - your feet will still be warm despite being wet. If it's colder than 45F I'd almost certainly swap out the pedals for SPDs so I could wear my winter MTB shoes for longer rides - they'll keep my feet pretty dry since their one-piece design doesn't let water in through the cleat holes.
...
Talking about shoe covers, I've found the best ones are the ones which are basically oversized socks. Performance, Castelli, and Defeet sell them, amongst others, or you can just buy a pair of xxl hiking socks and cut a slit for the cleat. They wear out fairly quickly, but they work better and they are much cheaper than the usual shoe covers. Putting the socks on the outside of the shoe seems to keep my feet warmer (and block wind just as effectively) than putting the socks inside my shoe with a windblocking shoe cover.
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Old 11-21-10, 01:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Essex
Curious - why cycle in the rain? Your braking is the pits, you can't see much and cars are a danger.
If you don't ride in the rain, you'll barely ride at all if you live in certain areas like the PNW. In any case, you can see plenty and cars are always a danger. HTFU.

As far as riding in 45 degree rain goes, that's really no big deal. If you want to be warm, neoprene tights are the way to go. You won't be dry, but you'll be plenty warm. For gloves, those temps are too warm to go with anything that's actually warm. Neoprene should do the trick, and neoprene plus polypropylene liners is certainly more than adequate. For rain in the low 30's, I like to wear insulated goretex gloves.

Don't bother trying to stay dry in the rain -- there's hardly a more futile exercise.
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Old 11-21-10, 01:38 AM
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Originally Posted by banerjek
If you don't ride in the rain, you'll barely ride at all if you live in certain areas like the PNW. In any case, you can see plenty and cars are always a danger. HTFU.

Don't bother trying to stay dry in the rain -- there's hardly a more futile exercise.
+1
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Old 11-21-10, 07:10 AM
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Originally Posted by banerjek
If you don't ride in the rain, you'll barely ride at all if you live in certain areas like the PNW. In any case, you can see plenty and cars are always a danger. HTFU.

As far as riding in 45 degree rain goes, that's really no big deal. If you want to be warm, neoprene tights are the way to go. You won't be dry, but you'll be plenty warm. For gloves, those temps are too warm to go with anything that's actually warm. Neoprene should do the trick, and neoprene plus polypropylene liners is certainly more than adequate. For rain in the low 30's, I like to wear insulated goretex gloves.

Don't bother trying to stay dry in the rain -- there's hardly a more futile exercise.
Any cyclist in PNW using something like a Goretex drysuit? https://www.columbussupply.com/produc...200&price=7555

Since I am often hours underwater - the only way to ensure being bone dry is a drysuit.
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Old 11-21-10, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Essex
Curious - why cycle in the rain? Your braking is the pits, you can't see much and cars are a danger. Why not just put the thing on a stationary trainer and wait for a better day? When I got caught in the rain in Manhattan (once) I nearly got killed several times over just trying to get back home.

Essex
Most of my real foul weather riding is comprised of winter work commutes. I have a 30-40 minute ride to work (into... Manhattan!), which is just about perfect in terms of how far I feel like going no matter how crappy it is outside. I'm nearly killed a lot anyway. Rain isn't even something I think about--just put on different clothes.

More of a concern for me are days like this:



Literally the whole span of the Brooklyn Bridge bike path (about 2 miles in length) covered in ice. I took the picture once I got to the end. A shot of the span would have looked nice but there was no way I was going to try to stop or put my feet down.

Last edited by lukasz; 11-21-10 at 09:32 AM.
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Old 11-21-10, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Essex
Any cyclist in PNW using something like a Goretex drysuit? https://www.columbussupply.com/produc...200&price=7555

Since I am often hours underwater - the only way to ensure being bone dry is a drysuit.
I've never seen anyone wearing one of those. However, commuters often wear breathable rain pants and jackets. Goretex is common, but Showers Pass is also very popular.

You will roast if you try to wear something like that while cycling for any period of time in 45 degree rain, and that looks really bulky anyway. People expect too much out of breathable materials. To work, they require vapor pressure. For example, if you're hot and sweaty, and the environment is cold and dry (as often occurs in skiing situations), vapor pressure is high, so the moisture passes through the membrane and you're nice and comfy.

However, if there is 100% relative humidity, it's easy to overwhelm the goretex membrane. Not that you don't get rid of any sweat, but it's quite limited, so if you're working hard at all, you'll be soaked.
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Old 11-21-10, 01:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian Ratliff
Talking about shoe covers, I've found the best ones are the ones which are basically oversized socks. Performance, Castelli, and Defeet sell them, amongst others, or you can just buy a pair of xxl hiking socks and cut a slit for the cleat. They wear out fairly quickly, but they work better and they are much cheaper than the usual shoe covers. Putting the socks on the outside of the shoe seems to keep my feet warmer (and block wind just as effectively) than putting the socks inside my shoe with a windblocking shoe cover.
It looks rather freddish, but a good thing to do to the above is duct tape the tops.
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Old 11-21-10, 01:58 PM
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Originally Posted by RoboCheme
I find trainers extremely boring and I just won't use them. Also, as I said, I enjoy riding in the rain. There's almost no traffic on the roads that I pick so it's very quiet and peaceful. Just me and the elements.
I hate trainers as well but got one anyway. Makes it far easier to get some time on the bike 6-7 days a week.
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Old 11-21-10, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by lukasz
Most of my real foul weather riding is comprised of winter work commutes. I have a 30-40 minute ride to work (into... Manhattan!), which is just about perfect in terms of how far I feel like going no matter how crappy it is outside. I'm nearly killed a lot anyway. Rain isn't even something I think about--just put on different clothes.

More of a concern for me are days like this:



Literally the whole span of the Brooklyn Bridge bike path (about 2 miles in length) covered in ice. I took the picture once I got to the end. A shot of the span would have looked nice but there was no way I was going to try to stop or put my feet down.
That's bust your teeth time. Looks like it's around the East River near the housing complexes? I'm thinkin' tires with spikes.
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Old 11-21-10, 03:54 PM
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Originally Posted by banerjek
I've never seen anyone wearing one of those. However, commuters often wear breathable rain pants and jackets. Goretex is common, but Showers Pass is also very popular.

You will roast if you try to wear something like that while cycling for any period of time in 45 degree rain, and that looks really bulky anyway. People expect too much out of breathable materials. To work, they require vapor pressure. For example, if you're hot and sweaty, and the environment is cold and dry (as often occurs in skiing situations), vapor pressure is high, so the moisture passes through the membrane and you're nice and comfy.

However, if there is 100% relative humidity, it's easy to overwhelm the goretex membrane. Not that you don't get rid of any sweat, but it's quite limited, so if you're working hard at all, you'll be soaked.
Thanks for the reference. Showers Pass is nice looking foul weather gear. Nicer than the Helly Hansen / Henri Lloyd stuff marine gear. I certainly agree with the drysuit stuff getting too hot. Additionally, they really can limit movement though I've not tried Goretex for regular wet sports like kayaking, or sail boarding. Seems that at the end of the day getting a bit wet is a small sacrifice vs. being tied up in a cocoon of waterproof materials. I'll have to try some rain riding...though not in NYC.

Cheers,

Essex

Last edited by Essex; 11-21-10 at 05:09 PM.
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Old 11-21-10, 04:33 PM
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Have you tried PI Amfibs? https://shop.pearlizumi.com/product.p...578588&outlet= They aren't waterproof, but they're somewhat water resistant and very warm. That's what I'd wear at 45 degrees with rain.

I hope you find an answer for the gloves. I haven't found a great pair yet. Sometimes I'll just take a spare pair and switch mid-ride.
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