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Is your nice road bike your commuter as well?

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Is your nice road bike your commuter as well?

Old 10-09-04, 08:36 PM
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jslopez
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Is your nice road bike your commuter as well?

As the topic suggests, thanks to the advice of these forums I went ahead and got myself a pretty good bike. Previously I was using a pretty sturdy Rockhopper moutian bike for my commute to work (the wife is now using it) and there were no particular worries or minor accidents (like dings, scratches, any breaking of parts etc) plus since the cost was relatively low, if something did happen I would hurt that bad.

Moving to the current ride, my LBs advised that it can easily take the daily commute (Santa Monica to Venice) and admittedly the raods are fairly good. I'm just wondering though if I'm taking an unnecessary risk and it would be better to just use the good road bike for real training rides and get a clunker for the commute.

Anyway if there are people in a similar situtaion, using their "good" bikes on the everyday path or people who would advise against it, I'd really appreciate your thoughts.
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Old 10-09-04, 08:40 PM
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I ride my road bike to work. I tried using my mtb, but with knobbies it just wasn't fun. And my $20 beater bike also wouldn't be fun.
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Old 10-09-04, 08:46 PM
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I also use my nice fancy road bike for the commute. It rains alot here in the winter so I'm considering switching to my hybrid for the commute.
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Old 10-09-04, 08:53 PM
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Well, I for one, use my good bike for my commuter. I own two Paramounts, and use them both. I ride my '89 in the summer, and my '76 in the winter, when the paniers come in handy for hauling extra clothes back and forth. However, I don't usually ride these bikes in the snow and rain, but it does happen from time to time, and they are none the worse for the wear. If you have a good bike, enjoy it!!
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Old 10-09-04, 08:55 PM
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No way, baby. But I suppose it comes down to where you can leave the bike. I have four commuters!!
 
Old 10-09-04, 09:00 PM
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No, I don't use any of my 'good' road or mountain bikes to commute as they are not equipped with racks. I do need to haul a few items with me so I either use my coffee shop or light touring bike as commuters.
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Old 10-09-04, 09:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Fat Hack
No way, baby. But I suppose it comes down to where you can leave the bike. I have four commuters!!
"No, I don't use any of my 'good' road or mountain bikes to commute as they are not equipped with racks. I do need to haul a few items with me so I either use my coffee shop or light touring bike as commuters."


Well let's say the bike stays inside the office (it has it's own cubicle ) and theft isn't really that big of a concern. And on the hauling of equipment side I pretty much have clothes and a nice restroom to change with when I get to the office. I'm just wondering if your day to day commute makes your bike prone to certian damage and if you should just "save" it for more serious rides.

Admittedly I may be just over cautious but I'd rather ask and learn from you guys rahter than going "DOH!" later on.
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Old 10-09-04, 09:04 PM
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I ride my nice road bike to work. It's faster and more comfortable than any clunker. The roads are pretty good, so I don't beat up the wheels. It never rains here either.

I like simplicity so I would not have two road bikes, although I do have a mountain bike. I can't imagine riding it 36 miles round trip to work, though. I take clothes and food by car once a week so I don't have to put racks on my bike or wear a backpack.
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Old 10-09-04, 09:05 PM
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you mean like potholes and such?

I think it's rather obvious to you whether your route is too rough on your bike.
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Old 10-09-04, 09:06 PM
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This is how I ended up with 4 bikes - not by upgrading on the high end, but by improving on the low end - the so-called "commuter".

A road is a road and the bike knows no difference. What truly makes a difference is the conditions it gets ridden in - specifically street and weather. Santa Monica to Venice is pretty tame normally (weatherwise) and if the streets are in good shape, you are good to go.

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Old 10-09-04, 09:12 PM
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OK, I've ridden my 'good' road bikes, both geared and fixed to work when I didn't have to haul anything. There is no difference, whether you're riding solo to work or riding among a pack of riders on a Saturday morning.
Ride your 'good' bike to work and feel good about it......
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Old 10-09-04, 09:14 PM
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Originally Posted by LordOpie
you mean like potholes and such?

I think it's rather obvious to you whether your route is too rough on your bike.
I know I must be sounding so ignorant right now Lord Opie, thank you (and everyone else) for being so patient.

This all started when a friend of mine said someting to the effect of "Aren't you putting your bike at risk by commuting with it?"

The kid in me says, "NAH, it will be fine". But the adult wants some assurance (as I will not be able to spend on a bike like this anytime soon). From the feedback so far though it seems like, given decent roads and general good sense and luck with cars, their bikes seem to be safe from any harm on the daily commute.

Is this a fair statement?
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Old 10-09-04, 09:26 PM
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i believe that renters or home owners insurance would cover your bike if it was significantly damaged. You should, obviously, check with your agent on that.

That said, if my bike got toasted on the commute, then so did I and replacing my bike would probably be the last of my concern.

I think the most likely damage to my ride would be to my wheels and that just requires truing.

If you want to maximize your safety level, take a motorcycle class. The one I took really stressed anticipating traffic problems and planning solutions to them in advanced.
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Old 10-09-04, 09:28 PM
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I dont ride my nice bike around school because I dont want to leave it out in the weather and I dont want it stolen. I really do need to find an old beater bike to go to class on... Anyone know where/how I could get a beater messenger style singlespeed?
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Old 10-09-04, 09:30 PM
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In our minds, we feel that a new bike or car only has a finite amount of miles or life built into it. And we don't want to "waste" any of it if it's not necessary. If you owned a Ferrari, you probably wouldn't drive it to work every day after the first few times to show it off. We like the thought that we have a vehicle that is perfect and is snug and warm and not clocking up the miles on anything other than the "special" rides.

Then we eventually get used to owning it and we say screw it and ride it any darn time we please.

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Old 10-09-04, 09:33 PM
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Originally Posted by 55/Rad
Then we eventually get used to owning it and we say screw it and ride it any darn time we please.
haha, exactly.

But my roadbike is like a BMW motorcycle and only gets better with miles. I'm just starting to break it in
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Old 10-09-04, 09:35 PM
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Originally Posted by LordOpie
i believe that renters or home owners insurance would cover your bike if it was significantly damaged. You should, obviously, check with your agent on that.

That said, if my bike got toasted on the commute, then so did I and replacing my bike would probably be the last of my concern.

I think the most likely damage to my ride would be to my wheels and that just requires truing.

If you want to maximize your safety level, take a motorcycle class. The one I took really stressed anticipating traffic problems and planning solutions to them in advanced.

Had a motorcycle before and maybe that's why I'm more at ease with cycling in general.

My final question (as my fears have been laid to rest) is since you mentioned wheels, there have been recommendations to have 2 wheel sets (one for the daily use/training and one for racing). Would this be because wheels are the most prone to damage or something along the lines of training (ie getting cheaper/heavier wheelsets as resistance training then fly off when having the "better" wheelset).
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Old 10-09-04, 09:38 PM
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I think the important question is what do you mean by "good" and what do you mean by beater. Also what are you plans for replacing your good road bike in the future. If I had saved every penny for 10 years to be my good road bike then I would get a beater. If you really itching to get another bike in 2 to 4 years use the good bike as much as you can so you can say hey I ride it everyday to work and I deserve a new bike. Then keep the old road for commute or repeat the process.

Personally living in New England and not having any rack mount points (nor wanting a rack) on my road bike. I am currently looking into a job that is 6 miles away from home and thinking of doing the commute by bike and looking to get a specific commuter bike for it. I think I want an aluminum frame cyclocross bike. Alu do to rust or lack there of considering this is NE. And cyclocross for the slightly larger tires and small amounts of tread for winter riding. In California though corosion would not be a problem.
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Old 10-09-04, 09:38 PM
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see Rad's post...

I bought a new set of wheels for training/big rides, but just got too lazy to swap out with the old set of wheels each time I wanted to do a different style ride. I say beat up your current wheels, keeping true as needed, then splurge on a new set.

I suspect one reason I don't swap 'em out is cuz my new wheels stay pretty damned true even with the pounding.
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Old 10-09-04, 09:40 PM
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Originally Posted by 55/Rad
In our minds, we feel that a new bike or car only has a finite amount of miles or life built into it. And we don't want to "waste" any of it if it's not necessary. If you owned a Ferrari, you probably wouldn't drive it to work every day after the first few times to show it off. We like the thought that we have a vehicle that is perfect and is snug and warm and not clocking up the miles on anything other than the "special" rides.

Then we eventually get used to owning it and we say screw it and ride it any darn time we please.

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Interesting analogy as I'm about to use something along the same lines.

Back in the old country (the Philippines) I could never understand why people would buy these expensive Jaguars. Not only because they were expensive but because their low profile was just asking for a beating from our moon crater like roads.

Apparently I was comparing apples and oranges with regards to the above and road bikes, but better safe than sorry.
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Old 10-09-04, 10:08 PM
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I use my only road bike for my commute, 15 miles, fairly good roads. I am going to convert it into a commuter when I get my full carbon frame and swap the wheels, fork, seat post, etc to the carbon bike and swap all the stock parts back on the trek. Otherwise I am not too woried about the commute. I can stick my bike in my office and I can lock the door and lock the bike down so it does not ride away.

Otherwise enjoy the commute
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Old 10-10-04, 04:58 AM
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I ride my hybrid as my commuter (mud guards & rack) and save up the roadie for the weekends. The heavy hybrid is actually good training ... I feel like I'm flying when I get on the much lighter roadie on the weekend.
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Old 10-10-04, 05:24 AM
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I have 3 bikes
(1) foul weather (winter) commuter - mountain bike w/ 1.4 slicks, fenders, rack, kickstand, front and rear lights, pannier. (2) good weather commuter - touring bike with a double crank, mavic MA-3 wheels, 28c gatorskin tires, fenders, rack, kickstand, rear light, and large trunk bag. (3) Weekend Road Warrior Racing bike.
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Old 10-10-04, 05:47 AM
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I never use my "racing bike" for the commute but I do have multiple options:

(1) Old Ritchey steel bike with rack
(2) Gary Fisher Mt. Bike with rack

My commuters only have a clean drive train, the rest stays dirty
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Old 10-10-04, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by marnan
I have 3 bikes
(1) foul weather (winter) commuter - mountain bike w/ 1.4 slicks, fenders, rack, kickstand, front and rear lights, pannier. (2) good weather commuter - touring bike with a double crank, mavic MA-3 wheels, 28c gatorskin tires, fenders, rack, kickstand, rear light, and large trunk bag. (3) Weekend Road Warrior Racing bike.
Jeez, I thought I was bad!!

I have a....

1. Reasonable steel commuter for good days and long commutes: comfy, old 531.
2. Reasonable aluminium commuter for slightly wet days, and long commutes: 1999 Speclialzed
3. Very crap commuter with mud-guards everywhere, for very wet days: older 531
4. Very crap Tange commuter for shortish trips that I can lock up anywhere and not worry about.
5. Goodish Dedacciai 7003 (alu) for non-commuting on wet days ("lycra bike")
6. My good old 531 workhorse, for nice days that I've had for 15 years. (lycra bike)
7. AND.....my new "Kervello". Have I mentioned that recently? (lycra bike)

I have three other frames that aren't built up
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