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If you could pick one cycling book...

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

If you could pick one cycling book...

Old 12-01-10, 09:25 PM
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If you could pick one cycling book...

If you had to recommend one road cycling book to someone, what would it be? I'm trying to learn as much about the sport as I can and my eyes hurt from looking at forums and internet sites all day. I'm an old-school reader. I prefer an actual book.

I picked up cycling primarily as a substitute to running. I do it for the fitness aspect of the sport...but I'd really like to do some road races eventually. I'm interested in training programs, cycling skills, and equipment maintenance. Not real interested in cycling personalities or race stories.
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Old 12-01-10, 09:26 PM
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"Serious Cyclist" is a pretty good book and so is "The Ultimate Ride"
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Old 12-01-10, 09:27 PM
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Roadie.
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Old 12-01-10, 09:29 PM
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easy...The Rider, by Tim Krabbe

maybe not the best read for your intended purposes, but the best nonetheless.

as an alternative, i'd recommend Roadie. it will teach you a lot.
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Old 12-01-10, 09:34 PM
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i liked "french revolutions" by tim moore. funny, interesting, great book i think. i know it's not what you are looking for, but it is still a great book about cycling.

what you are looking for is the cyclists training bible
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/193...SIN=1934030201

or serious cycling
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/073...SIN=073604129X

but they aren't as interesting.

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Old 12-01-10, 10:00 PM
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I'll be honest. I read Krabbe's "The Rider". It's good in its own realm, but it's not something you can give to a new rider. There's so much nuance. A new rider has no frame of reference. We point to it because it speaks our language deeper than most. But if you don't know the language...



By the way, I love this type of thread.
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Old 12-01-10, 10:09 PM
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Dog in a Hat is a good read also.
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Old 12-01-10, 10:18 PM
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Originally Posted by thesmoothdome
Dog in a Hat is a good read also.
This is my favourite. But it's really about the world of pro cycling, not really what you're looking for.
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Old 12-01-10, 10:23 PM
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Originally Posted by pablosnazzy
i liked "french revolutions" by tim moore. funny, interesting, great book i think. i know it's not what you are looking for, but it is still a great book about cycling.

what you are looking for is the cyclists training bible
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/193...SIN=1934030201

or serious cycling
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/073...SIN=073604129X

but they aren't as interesting.
Just ordered the Cyclist Training Bible. Thanks.
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Old 12-01-10, 10:24 PM
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Originally Posted by pgjackson
If you had to recommend one road cycling book to someone, what would it be? I'm trying to learn as much about the sport as I can and my eyes hurt from looking at forums and internet sites all day. I'm an old-school reader. I prefer an actual book.

I picked up cycling primarily as a substitute to running. I do it for the fitness aspect of the sport...but I'd really like to do some road races eventually. I'm interested in training programs, cycling skills, and equipment maintenance. Not real interested in cycling personalities or race stories.
You can choose training or maintenance. Not both in one book. Friel's Cyclist Training Bible for training and, well, sheldonbrown.com for maintenance.
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Old 12-01-10, 10:30 PM
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Originally Posted by EventServices
I'll be honest. I read Krabbe's "The Rider". It's good in its own realm, but it's not something you can give to a new rider. There's so much nuance. A new rider has no frame of reference. We point to it because it speaks our language deeper than most. But if you don't know the language...



By the way, I love this type of thread.
i agree. The Rider is not the best for a new cyclist. From an entertainment point, The Rider is the best cycling book i've ever read. the new cyclist will benefit GREATLY from Roadie!
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Old 12-01-10, 10:32 PM
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Roadie was the most fun read.
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Old 12-01-10, 10:32 PM
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Old 12-01-10, 10:39 PM
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I really love the "The Rider" book. One of the best books I have read, cycling related or not. But it is best if you read the Roadie first then a lot of terms in the Rider will be self explanatory. Not to mention that it makes watching bike races on TV more enjoyable.

I have let my friends and co-workers borrowed these two books and whether they ride or not they thoroughly enjoyed reading them.
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Old 12-01-10, 10:40 PM
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Originally Posted by pgjackson
Just ordered the Cyclist Training Bible. Thanks.
I found this book very helpful.
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Old 12-01-10, 10:53 PM
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Originally Posted by tuxbailey
I really love the "The Rider" book. One of the best books I have read, cycling related or not. But it is best if you read the Roadie first then a lot of terms in the Rider will be self explanatory. Not to mention that it makes watching bike races on TV more enjoyable.

I have let my friends and co-workers borrowed these two books and whether they ride or not they thoroughly enjoyed reading them.
I will check this out next.
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Old 12-01-10, 10:56 PM
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Originally Posted by pgjackson
I'm interested in training programs, cycling skills, and equipment maintenance.
Originally Posted by Blackdays
Roadie.
super fail! in terms of maintenance, besides the park tool website, zinn has been the most helpful for me
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Old 12-02-10, 07:05 AM
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A) Thanks to the OP for this thread. I've been looking into picking up a good cycling book to read.

B) I can't wait to get my hands on a copy of this movie...
(not a book, I know, but it looks like it would've been a great "read" on it's own):

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Old 12-02-10, 07:10 AM
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"The United States of Delirium: A Book About The Race Across America"

(I think I've found my book along with all the other suggestions here)

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Old 12-02-10, 08:40 AM
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Lots of good suggestions here:
https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...ght=must+reads
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Old 12-02-10, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by canthidefromme
super fail! in terms of maintenance, besides the park tool website, zinn has been the most helpful for me
You expect me to read the whole post?
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Old 12-02-10, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by canthidefromme
in terms of maintenance, besides the park tool website, zinn has been the most helpful for me
+1. The Bicycling Magazine maintenance guide is pretty good as well. I would say it is a toss-up between Zinn and Bicycling, except that Zinn has torque specifications at the back of his books.
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Old 12-02-10, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Commodus
This is my favourite. But it's really about the world of pro cycling, not really what you're looking for.
Yeah, sorry about that. Couldn't be bothered with actually reading the rest of the OPs post. Saw book recommendation, made one. FWIW, I find Dr. Seuss' Oh the Places You'll Go to be an excellent read as well.
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Old 12-02-10, 08:52 AM
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THE RIDER is by far the best bike-racing allegory out there. Not a training book, but one that tells the story about a race and how it unfolds. You can re-read it dozens of times and still get stuff out of it. Incredibly, it's excellent even from a literary standpoint, and would hold up to scrutiny even in a literature-type class (not that you want that) despite being accessible.

I read ROADIE - probably good for a newb, but I was bored silly as even an intermediate-beginner cyclist, especially after having read THE RIDER. But as a newb, it's good.

I still haven't found a training oriented book I've liked. Probably a lot of this is because most cycling training books revolve around the use of PowerTaps ($$$) which I don't have, and thus end up being insanely complicated to translate to non-PT using.

Ironically, using your running routine and swapping time/intensity for cycling is probably your best bet for starters. Once you get used to pushing hard on the bike, a sprint-type DVD like Spinervals is excellent, as cycling does require leg power/strength that isn't emphasized in running.

And weirdly enough, running itself crosses over excellently to cycling. If you're strong on the run, you will definitely be strong on the bike. I think the weight-bearing nature of running and lack of coasting keeps it honest. Not to say cycling is easier than running (it's not) but there's more room with cycling to ease off and still cover distance.
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Old 12-02-10, 10:02 AM
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Originally Posted by hhnngg1

I still haven't found a training oriented book I've liked. Probably a lot of this is because most cycling training books revolve around the use of PowerTaps ($$$) which I don't have, and thus end up being insanely complicated to translate to non-PT using.
Lemonds book is a good read for old school training that holds up very well by today's standards. I never heard of 'The Rider' but your review has sparked my interest.
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