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What tubular tires should I get ?

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What tubular tires should I get ?

Old 12-09-10, 11:01 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by jfmckenna View Post
No way dude thats the best part, wait... what are we talking about?

---

Conti sprinters get the best bang for the buck award imo. Having said that you buy tubulars to have a quality ride so if you get cheap tubs you get a cheap ride. Veloflex Criteriums are the plushyest most supple soft delightful treads I've ever donned on my wheels. Challenge makes a reasonable priced tire as well.

Oh and don't ever pay anyone to mount your tubs, learn to do it your self and embrace one of the finest traditions in all of bike racing.
just to be contrary
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Old 12-09-10, 11:09 AM
  #27  
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CDR has an excellent blog post about gluing tubulars. I'll see if I can find it, if he doesn't pop in here first. Here's the takeaway: stretch 'em good, use plenty of glue, and be patient.
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Old 12-09-10, 11:57 AM
  #28  
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I've read CDR's post, and also found this very helpful when gluing some CX tubulars: https://www.velocipedesalon.com/forum...che-10244.html

It isn't hard at all. I mean, it is just glue. Read up and do it.

I bought some Vittoria pave tires a few weeks ago that have somehow not reached me yet. Very much looking forward to riding them.
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Old 12-09-10, 12:41 PM
  #29  
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If you are overheating your rims on a road bike , you need to work on your descending skills. You are braking too much.
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Old 12-09-10, 01:08 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by logdrum View Post
If you are overheating your rims on a road bike , you need to work on your descending skills. You are braking too much.
you're not wrong, but as was mentioned earlier, that's a whole different discussion
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Old 12-09-10, 01:20 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
I'm with Wens on this. If you're braking hard enough, long enough to worry about warping carbon clinchers, I have to think you're going to get enough heat to loosen the glue on a carbon tubular.

And rolling a tubular on a descent is not a good thing, see e.g. Joseba Beloki.

So if your purpose is doing descents that require prolonged braking, you might want to think wheels other than carbon.

Of course a completely different approach to the problem might be to examine your braking technique, but that's a different thread.
+1. incidentally, i have read second hand that indurain used clincher fronts on tdf descents in order to keep from overheating the glue. if anyone has a primary source indicating the same, please post.
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Old 12-09-10, 01:44 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by kudude View Post
just to be contrary
For those who haven't seen it.
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Old 12-09-10, 04:11 PM
  #33  
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Holy **** that was amazing in slow motion. What a recovery.
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Old 12-09-10, 04:24 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by kudude View Post
just to be contrary
Is there any glue at all on that tire? It looks to me like it was just thrown on and pumped up. I thought only triathletes did silly stuff like that.
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Old 12-09-10, 09:26 PM
  #35  
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Just spent nearly the same for Vittorias, glue and labor as I paid for tires for my vehicle. Tubulars are not for the faint of heart or poor racers....
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Old 12-09-10, 11:11 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by BrainInAJar View Post
After a foolish attempt to glue my own in which I successfully glued myself to everything in the dining room but not much else I brought it in to the shop. $50 for a tubular glue-up
Sounds like you got suckered. Gluing on a sew-up (tubular) tire takes practice and a bit of patience, but it certainly isn't worth $50. I've been gluing mine on since the mid-1970s. My first attempts were messy but now I can do them with just one beer and they look "catalog-photo perfect". HINT: make sure you mount and inflate a sew-up on a rim without glue and allow it to stretch for at least a few days before attempting to glue it on. It will go on a LOT easier that way.

Patching a sew-up is another matter - we're talking three beers. I only use patched sew-ups as spares.
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Old 12-09-10, 11:34 PM
  #37  
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Funny....I was about to update my twitter and facebook statuses to acknowledge that I am starting to miss that familiar Mastik One buzz. Thanks to some banter earlier this cross season I euphemistically refer to it as "pink elephant time".

Tubulars can be glued - very easily - as long as you pay attention to WTF you are doing.

If you aren't a patient person, if you're the kind of person that doesn't really have attention to detail or patience then skip them. If you aren't willing to glue your own tubulars then DON'T ride them. Not saying you can't have others glue them for you just that you should be able to glue your own. If you are unable to do that then don't ride them unless you are OK with the idea of hitting the ground and never holding any else responsible. In other words man up or go clincher.

Tubulars are nice. Supple. Different.

Clinchers today - there's little to no difference unless you are a discerning rider. Everyone is different and people will have their favorites.

My $0.02 - when it comes to carbon - tubular setups are just much lighter and less complicated. As a result I tend to feel like they are better made.

So....where was this going?

between tires I would throw out that Vittoria Corsa EVO CX II 320 tpi and Veloflex are the 2 in play. Everything else is a training tire or just not there.
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Old 12-09-10, 11:41 PM
  #38  
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Oh - tips on gluing....best one ever is one I picked up from reading something that Lenard Zinn put out there this fall. Everyone knows to stretch tubulars before you glue.

......but.....he advocated actually going back and restretching the tubular after glue had dried on the base tape. Just momentarily and right before slapping it on the glued up rim.

Of course this requires that you have an additional tubular rim around. Luckily I always do. I can tell you that this simple step just seems to string it out enough to allow for GREAT positioning (remember I mostly glue cross tires) and easy final mounting. The results have been GREAT. Best tip I have never read about...
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Old 12-10-10, 12:37 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by Psimet2001 View Post
Oh - tips on gluing....best one ever is one I picked up from reading something that Lenard Zinn put out there this fall. Everyone knows to stretch tubulars before you glue.

......but.....he advocated actually going back and restretching the tubular after glue had dried on the base tape. Just momentarily and right before slapping it on the glued up rim.

Of course this requires that you have an additional tubular rim around. Luckily I always do. I can tell you that this simple step just seems to string it out enough to allow for GREAT positioning (remember I mostly glue cross tires) and easy final mounting. The results have been GREAT. Best tip I have never read about...
Could you use a clincher rim for final stretching? I'm sure I remember reading something about doing that somewhere. I'll be doing my first gluing in the not too distant future. I've drunk the Corsa Evo CX koolaid btw FWIW - I really like the open tubular version so I want to try the real thing.
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Old 12-10-10, 12:44 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by MajorMantra View Post
Could you use a clincher rim for final stretching? I'm sure I remember reading something about doing that somewhere. I'll be doing my first gluing in the not too distant future. I've drunk the Corsa Evo CX koolaid btw FWIW - I really like the open tubular version so I want to try the real thing.
I race on Vittorias.

I wouldn't use a clincher for final stretching. Just slap it on without a final stretching. The final stretching helps but not "required".
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Old 12-10-10, 09:39 AM
  #41  
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Some carbon clinchers are very susceptible to warping under hard braking. Even Edge had this problem with some of their clinchers, but the tubulars hold up perfectly. It's because the walls of the rim are often so thin at the braking surface. Tubulars don't have that issue.

As for melting the glue, that is possible... but you'd have the produce VERY high temps all the way across the tire seating surface (which is relativly far away from the brake surface. Sure it can happen under extreme circumstances, but is high unlikely.


For tires, don't go too cheap... you'll lose the whole benefit of going to tubulars in the first place if you get $hitty tires. Vittoria Corsa CX, 23mm are a solid choice that is fairly durable. Get some FMB's if you want something really nice

Oh yea.... please, please, please, don't use Tufo tape. Learn to glue yourself or pay a shop to do it properly.
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Old 12-10-10, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by ciocc_cat View Post
Sounds like you got suckered. Gluing on a sew-up (tubular) tire takes practice and a bit of patience, but it certainly isn't worth $50. I've been gluing mine on since the mid-1970s. My first attempts were messy but now I can do them with just one beer and they look "catalog-photo perfect". HINT: make sure you mount and inflate a sew-up on a rim without glue and allow it to stretch for at least a few days before attempting to glue it on. It will go on a LOT easier that way.

Patching a sew-up is another matter - we're talking three beers. I only use patched sew-ups as spares.
maybe for you, it isn't worth $50. but, gluing a tub requires the glue, expertise, and manual labor, three things that a lot of people here are short on. plus, throw in the peace of mind (if you have chosen the right shop) that you aren't going to roll your tire. not to sound like an elitist, but $50 is a drop in the bucket compared to what many people here spend on bike stuff.

p.s. how did you keep your beer cold for that long?
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Old 12-10-10, 10:42 AM
  #43  
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you're doing recreational riding. i would sell the tubular wheels you just bought and use clinchers. the inconvenience of tubulars outweighs any benefit for recreational riding.
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Old 12-10-10, 11:25 AM
  #44  
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Just a sorta-related FWIW...the Gigantex sourced carbon clinchers that Psimet sells have a special brake track that is lower on the rim sidewall, and is slightly raised, presumably because they're putting extra heat conductive material in there. I have ridden them down some killer descents, including Hors Category mountains in Spain and France, without issue.
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Old 12-13-10, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by ciocc_cat View Post
I've been riding tubulars since 1975. My favs were Vittoria Seta Extras (1977) and Continental Sprinters (1986). I don't race anymore, so I'm happy with a 300g training tire for training/everyday riding. My Ciocc currently rolls on Servizio Corse tubulars purchased from the Yellow Jersey (three tires for only $50). I've been riding these for over a year now on typically less-than-ideal rural parish roads and they've held up just fine.
Thank=you! This is the answer I was hoping for!
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Old 12-13-10, 07:00 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by jfmckenna View Post
Veloflex Criteriums are the plushyest most supple soft delightful treads I've ever donned on my wheels. Challenge makes a reasonable priced tire as well.
I love those Criteriums. Nearly the finest tire I have used. I only get about 2K miles from the rear tire and you need a bit of luck to get them under $75. I'm trying the Challenge Strada right now. I only have a few miles, but they seem to be another good choice. I'm thinking about the Veloflex Roubaix at 25mm. Maybe I am getting old but it seems the fatter the tire the better. I briefly rode some Dugast PRs at 27mm. Those were like butter.
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Old 12-13-10, 07:04 PM
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Originally Posted by fly:yes/land:no View Post
maybe for you, it isn't worth $50. but, gluing a tub requires the glue, expertise, and manual labor, three things that a lot of people here are short on. plus, throw in the peace of mind (if you have chosen the right shop) that you aren't going to roll your tire. not to sound like an elitist, but $50 is a drop in the bucket compared to what many people here spend on bike stuff.

p.s. how did you keep your beer cold for that long?
I can still glue two sew-ups on in under 20 minutes. I apply Panracer cement evenly to both rims, allow to dry about 10 minutes (consuming beer in process), then roll my (pre-stretched) tires on. Then again, I used to work in a bike shop and I've only been doing this since the mid-1970s. I guess experience counts for something, huh?
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Old 12-13-10, 07:14 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by Psimet2001 View Post
I race on Vittorias.

I wouldn't use a clincher for final stretching. But, I'd be happy to build you a tubular to use for your final stretching.
fify
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Old 12-13-10, 07:24 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by ciocc_cat View Post
I've been riding tubulars since 1975. My favs were Vittoria Seta Extras (1977) and Continental Sprinters (1986). I don't race anymore, so I'm happy with a 300g training tire for training/everyday riding. My Ciocc currently rolls on Servizio Corse tubulars purchased from the Yellow Jersey (three tires for only $50). I've been riding these for over a year now on typically less-than-ideal rural parish roads and they've held up just fine.
ive been thinking about this for my firs set of tubulars (gluing practice) before moving to veloflex tires. do they roll pretty smooth? they are going on my lugged steel bike so i really want tan sidewall tires.

the other option is Schwalbe Milanos. any input? i have a NOS continental triathlon but cant find a match...
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Old 12-13-10, 07:31 PM
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Vittoria Rubino Pro's or Conti Sprinters, very nice...
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