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-   -   Bent Hoods (https://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycling/715169-bent-hoods.html)

NeilChhabda 02-22-11 08:10 AM

Bent Hoods
 
I parked my bike at the bike shed in my school, and when I got back at the end of the day, my bike had been moved (still connected to the lock and pole), proabably cause it was a windy day. Anyway, there was no damage to the bike except from one thing; one of the hoods was bent, so rather than pointing straight, it pointed inwards. One of my cyclist friends suggested I just knock it back with a hammer, but I'm not sure if this is the solution. Can anyone please tell me how to solve this, thanks.

LesterOfPuppets 02-22-11 08:12 AM

I've done it with a rubber mallet on olde brake-only levers, but a better solution is to release the related brake cable and loosen the lever's clamp with appropriate allen wrench then tighten again when you get it properly positioned. Remember to reset your brake cable before riding.

WhyFi 02-22-11 08:20 AM

There are metal bands that secure the brake/shifter to the bars. Peel back the rubber hood and look for the fastener that connects to the bands. Loosen slightly, straighten, tighten (without overdoing it).

urbanknight 02-22-11 09:10 AM

Are you sure it's bent and not just shifted out of place? I would try WhyFi's suggestion first.

merlinextraligh 02-22-11 09:24 AM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 12261813)
There are metal bands that secure the brake/shifter to the bars. Peel back the rubber hood and look for the fastener that connects to the bands. Loosen slightly, straighten, tighten (without overdoing it).

Or just push it back in place with the palm of your hand.

WhyFi's answer is the technically correct answer, and really the best form.

But if it's not on really tight, you usually can move it fairly easily by hand, and if you don't have carbon fiber bars, there's no real harm. If it doesn't budge with afiar amount of force, follow Why fi's description.

johnny99 02-22-11 10:55 AM

If you have lightweight handlebars, don't just push the levers around without loosening the clamp. That can scratch your bars and weaken them. Lightweight handlebars are fragile enough and you really really do not want them failing in the middle of a ride.

merlinextraligh 02-22-11 02:13 PM

^ ever seen an alunimum handlebar fail at the point the brifter lever attached, absent a crash, or severe corrossion?

If you really want to be anal about it, you could remove the tape, remove the brifter, inspect the bar and then put it back and retape.

But if it's an aluminum handlebar, it's not bent from where it fell over, and the brifter was loose enough in the first place that it got shoved out of position just from the bike falling over, the amount of force necessary to recenter it is not going to hurt anything.

People have been doing this for decades with no reports of catstrophic failures.

keisatsu 02-22-11 02:36 PM

I second (or third or fourth...) just pulling it back into place.

I intentionally keep my brifters slightly loose (not loose enough to move under the forces of riding) to help lower the chance of damage in case of a crash.


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