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-   -   To Sell or Upgrade? (https://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycling/728088-sell-upgrade.html)

Doin Work son 04-16-11 06:30 AM

To Sell or Upgrade?
 
Hey guys. I have been really having trouble with a decision and need some input. I bought a Specialized Tarmac Elite (mixed 105 group) a few months ago and have the itch for something new. I upgraded my wheels to mavic ksyrium elite and love them, now I want to invest more money into my bike. My problem: either sell the bike and buy a new one, or upgrade. If I sell, i have 2500 to work with. If I upgrade, I will put a full sram force group on the bike. I love the frame and wheels, just would like better shifting and lighter parts. If I sell, I would be getting (probably) a rival bike with lesser wheels. The primary upgrade if I buy new would be a frameset and "one step up" groupo. Would it make more sense just to opt for the force since I am happy with my frame, or is a stiffer/lighter frame really that important if I am content with mine now?

neneboricua 04-16-11 06:43 PM

Is there something the 105 group isn't doing for you? 105 is a good group and shifts great when adjusted properly. One reason to drop the cash for Force is that you tried SRAM at a shop and just fell in love with it. If so, more power to you.

Otherwise, there are other things you could upgrade. I would focus on the contact points: saddle, shoes, handlebars/stem. Then make sure you have any gear you need to ride in the conditions you ride in. Shorts/bibs, gloves, etc... I first get the gear to make the body comfortable, then I worry about gear for the bike :)

M_FactorX19 04-16-11 07:03 PM

its a tough call really. if you like the frame then i say upgrade and you can always move your new parts over to a new frameset if you like. i will warn you now though that get out of control and expensive fast!!! ive spend at least twice if not three times as much on parts as i did for the bike! on the other hand its fun and enjoyable and it really let you make the bike yours and not just some cookie cutter pulled off the shelf at the local bike shop. you should be able to sell your old parts as well to make up for some of the difference as well but you might want to hang on to them if you plan to move the upgraded parts to a new frame later on.

oh and by the way rival and force are basicly the same the only difference is weight and most of that is in the crank. so if you go with the new bike route you arent missing much there other than a few grams. the performance (maybe minus the crank) is the same.

kabex 04-16-11 07:33 PM

If you are willing to sell the Tarmac and step away from brand names you could get something that blows your current bike out of the water. Pro quality stuff.

A good example is a November Bikes' bike, full carbon frame/fork, sram force/rival including deep carbon tubular wheels(50mm @ 1370 grams), at just 15lb for $2900. That's a kick ass racing machine for not much more than you paid for your tarmac, which was 4 pounds heavier.

Or you could go with Neuvation Cycling, which also builds up really nice bikes for little money but it doesn't include carbon hoops.

Anyway, if you think outside the box you can get something outstanding, if you go with the brands then you're getting a sideways upgrade at best.

Eclectus 04-16-11 11:10 PM

OP, you have lots of options. If you have a frame that is comfy for you, and if you have some tools, or live near a co-op bike-repair place, or you are willing to invest in tools, and components, you can learn a lot of fun stuff doing component-upgrading and re-building. You can have a blast doing this. None of my bikes is "stock". It's a blast to change components, and discover "This is goood." Or not so much. I can't think of buying a bike, even a really good bike, and not trying to make it work better, for me to like riding it more.

I have all kinds of bikes, steel, alu-alloy, carbon, they are all fun to modify, and PLAY WITH. Think of bikes as open-design toys. You can have fun changing things on your toys.

If you want some kindof super stock bike, no changes required, maybe you can find it. But after awhile, you'll realize, "It's good, but I think if I modified it, it would be better." Or "I need a completely new bike." But even if you decide on the latter, if you ride enough, you'll find you want to do some mods.

catonec 04-17-11 01:07 AM

moving up 1 level of components wont buy you much as far as weight and performance. we all understand the itch to upgrade, I fight it everyday (somedays I lose). You would be better served buying a second bike, keeping your current bike, and alternating which one you ride just to mix it up alittle.

Doin Work son 04-17-11 08:30 AM

Thanks guys. I rode a Rival equipped bike and fell in love. I don't mind 105, but just have an itch for Sram now. After reading the last comment, I realized that should I buy a full group, I have everything (sans stem and bars) to build a new bike if I picked up a cheap frameset.

jeffpoulin 04-17-11 10:34 AM


Originally Posted by Doin Work son (Post 12514691)
... now I want to invest more money into my bike.

You mean "spend". Unless you're winning races, buying or upgrading a high-end bicycle is never an "investment". If you're going to spend that kind of money, then why compromise? You'll just want to spend more again in a few months. Save up for the bike you really want (including groupset and wheels), then do it and be done with it. It'll cost less in the long run.

mpath 04-17-11 11:41 AM


Originally Posted by kabex (Post 12516927)
If you are willing to sell the Tarmac and step away from brand names you could get something that blows your current bike out of the water. Pro quality stuff.

A good example is a November Bikes' bike, full carbon frame/fork, sram force/rival including deep carbon tubular wheels(50mm @ 1370 grams), at just 15lb for $2900. That's a kick ass racing machine for not much more than you paid for your tarmac, which was 4 pounds heavier.

+1 on November.

2ndGen 04-17-11 12:07 PM


Originally Posted by kabex (Post 12516927)
If you are willing to sell the Tarmac and step away from brand names you could get something that blows your current bike out of the water. Pro quality stuff.

A good example is a November Bikes' bike, full carbon frame/fork, sram force/rival including deep carbon tubular wheels(50mm @ 1370 grams), at just 15lb for $2900. That's a kick ass racing machine for not much more than you paid for your tarmac, which was 4 pounds heavier.

Or you could go with Neuvation Cycling, which also builds up really nice bikes for little money but it doesn't include carbon hoops.

Anyway, if you think outside the box you can get something outstanding, if you go with the brands then you're getting a sideways upgrade at best.

November is the shizzy.

;)

2ndGen 04-17-11 12:09 PM


Originally Posted by catonec (Post 12517790)
moving up 1 level of components wont buy you much as far as weight and performance. we all understand the itch to upgrade, I fight it everyday (somedays I lose). You would be better served buying a second bike, keeping your current bike, and alternating which one you ride just to mix it up alittle.

Tell me about it ---> http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...1#post12503756

jsutkeepspining 04-17-11 12:09 PM

quarq






just saying :)


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