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is synapse with 105 a good starter vs cervelo?

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is synapse with 105 a good starter vs cervelo?

Old 05-03-11, 07:05 AM
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is synapse with 105 a good starter vs cervelo?

I am starting into road riding, with a group of friends. They all have higher end carbon fiber bikes. I was told by the LBS to consider cervelo RS as it is a top ranked plush bike. Another LBS tells me to consider synapse w/105 and not worry about carbon vs aluminum at this stage. I am fit, but not a big rider, used to be 10 years ago.

Can someone help me? Cost is less important, but I dont want to waste money if I wont see a difference.
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Old 05-03-11, 07:10 AM
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You will notice a difference, but save the big bucks until you know what you like.
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Old 05-03-11, 07:26 AM
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My wife has the full 105 alloy Synapse, and I can't say enough positive things about it. The new 105 feels nearly as sharp as my Dura-Ace 7800. The bike is fairly cheap ($1300), and just plain works. Not sure where you live, but if you're near an REI, you could buy it there, ride it for 2 weeks or 2 months or 2 years and then return it if you decide it's not right for you (lifetime unlimited return policy on everything from REI)
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Old 05-03-11, 07:45 AM
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The Synapse alloy w/ 105 is a very good bike. That is the bike I chose a few years ago when I was in your situation. I like it so much I have no desire to replace it. I have upgraded all the parts to Shimano 6700. I just felt the frame was worthy of spending some money on upgrading parts. I used my old parts, found another alloy Synapse frame and built my wife her first road bike. A new Synapse will have the later 5700 version shifters with under the bar tape cable routing. If my bike would have come with the 5700 105 parts and not the 5600 105 parts and my wife hadn't of wanted her first bike I would have kept the 105 parts on my bike. Not much difference between 5600 105 and 6700 Ultegra in performance. Just a little more bling.
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Old 05-03-11, 10:32 AM
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Thanks for the post sambb, I had an almost identical question.
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Old 05-03-11, 10:34 AM
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If cost is not important, get the Cervelo. End of story. It is the better bike.
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Old 05-03-11, 10:53 AM
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My wife also has the Synapse and loves it. It's a very good "higher end" starter bike. But it's not an R3. I also have a Cervelo and most owners feel there is nothing better.

My advice is test rode both. If you're fairly confident you're going to stay with cycling and the R3 feels right, get it. Otherwise, go with the Synapse. But if you're like most of us, get the Synapse and continue to ride more, you'll be looking to upgrade soon. Then you waste money by buying another bike (maybe an R3) and have to sell or keep your Synapse.
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Old 05-03-11, 11:11 AM
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I've tried both, and the Synapse had a muted feel to me. The RS is a comfort bike as well, but you can still feel the road a bit more, which is not a bad thing. The RS also felt more responsive.

Having said that, I went with an S2 and have zero regrets. Just did a century on it this weekend, and although it's not a "comfort" bike, it was still comfortable enough.

Go with Cervelo. In the wise words of Ferris, "It is so choice. If you have the means, I highly recommend picking one up."
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Old 05-03-11, 11:18 AM
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Both are good but (a) I rarely ride my Synapse since I got the Supersix and (b) buddy was used to his other Cervelos and regrets buying the RS because it was too plush. It's hard to go back I guess is the moral. Ride them both and decide. GL
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Old 05-03-11, 03:26 PM
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^^^I would think that going from a race geometry bike to a "plush" road bike would be a difficult thing to do. However, just starting out on one is a different matter. I have been riding for a good while and just got a Cannondale Synapse 5 105 (I am 50y/o) and I love it. My only upgrades will be new wheels from PSIMET when I can afford them. As a rider just starting out, I see no reason why he should spend Cervelo money, unless he has unlimited funds. The Synapse is a fine bike and to those who say it feels sluggish, I beg to differ.

Besides, it looks good.


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Old 05-03-11, 04:00 PM
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is there a big weight issue with not going carbon fiber?
It seems as a beginner who is serious, the components may be more important?
I am not a racer, just want to keep up with my friends
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Old 05-03-11, 04:43 PM
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If you are not sure if you like cycling definitely go with an aluminum bike(Such as a CAAD10). They can definitely keep up with a carbon fiber bike. And for a beginner a pound or two difference won't effect your speed much.


And no there is not a big weight difference between a high end aluminum bike and a carbon fiber bike. I say save your money and go aluminum. But if you want to start racing in the future get a carbon bike.
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Old 05-03-11, 04:55 PM
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I think you are overthinking this a bit. With the riding you will be doing, weight should not be a major concern for you. Of course you do not want some 30lb tank under you but, I think that, in the grand scheme of bike buying for guys like us, ie: recreational cyclists, most modern road bikes weigh much less than when I started back in the '70s. Back when I began riding, a 20lb bike was considered super lightweight. Now, even bikes like the aluminum Synapse come in at about 21lbs or so for my size (58cm). What is more important is fit and frame design. A well designed, proper fitting, aluminum frame will be a far nicer ride than a lighter carbon frame that doesn not fit your riding style. To some, carbon is the be all and end all in determining bike quality. i like to call those people "wrong." Frame geometry also is very important, I have a Synapse and for me the ride is very comfortable, but it will surely "get up and go" when stomped on. I do not see the sluggishness that some have reported. My only foreseeable upgrades are the wheels and the saddle. Other than that I do not see myself wanting a "better" bike for a long time to come...well maybe wanting but nt needing.

I also would not worry too much about componentry if your bike comes with 105. I have been riding 105 since 2005 and I have never had a singlt issue with it....not one. I knew a few racers when i lived in New Jersey who raced on the stuff and loved it. It will last you a good long while and do whatever you need it to do and do it very well.
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Old 05-03-11, 04:57 PM
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[QUOTE=fishymamba;12590892]If you are not sure if you like cycling definitely go with an aluminum bike(Such as a CAAD10). They can definitely keep up with a carbon fiber bike. QUOTE]

Of course we all realize that this has nothing to do with frame material. A "heavy" steel bike can keep up with a carbon bike with the right pair of legs propelling it.

Regards,

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Old 05-03-11, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by baj32161

Of course we all realize that this has nothing to do with frame material. A "heavy" steel bike can keep up with a carbon bike with the right pair of legs propelling it.

Regards,

Brian J.
Yup! lol. Don't want to start that argument! Listen to this guy ^^^
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Old 05-03-11, 06:05 PM
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Originally Posted by sambb
is there a big weight issue with not going carbon fiber?
It seems as a beginner who is serious, the components may be more important?
I am not a racer, just want to keep up with my friends
You may not be a racer, but to keep up with friends, you might be riding hard like you did 10 years ago.

There are 9 versions of the Cannondale Synapse, from alloy to hi mod carbon. The Cervelo RS has one version as far as frame material. Take a hard look at the rear triangle of both bikes.
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Old 05-03-11, 06:12 PM
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As you can see from my signature, I like both Cannondale and Cervelo. Like someone said above, ride both, weight the pros and cons and get the one you fall in love with. :-)
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Old 05-03-11, 06:30 PM
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Count the number of threads here from people that bought cheaper bikes and then wondered what better bike to upgrade to. The number of threads would be in the thousands. I went from a Trek to a CAAD to a Cervelo and wasted lots of money on the babystep upgrades.

If you have the money, buy the Cervelo and be done with it. If you love cycling, you will have a great bike for many years (I have now owned by Cervelo R3 for 5 years and have no desire to ever change). If you decide cycling isn't for you, the Cervelo will hold its value extremely well (better than Trek's or Cannondale's). You won't even lose much on a sale. If you have the money, it is a no-brainer. Just make sure it fits you perfect.
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Old 05-03-11, 07:48 PM
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Originally Posted by jrobe
Count the number of threads here from people that bought cheaper bikes and then wondered what better bike to upgrade to. The number of threads would be in the thousands. I went from a Trek to a CAAD to a Cervelo and wasted lots of money on the babystep upgrades.

If you have the money, buy the Cervelo and be done with it. If you love cycling, you will have a great bike for many years (I have now owned by Cervelo R3 for 5 years and have no desire to ever change). If you decide cycling isn't for you, the Cervelo will hold its value extremely well (better than Trek's or Cannondale's). You won't even lose much on a sale. If you have the money, it is a no-brainer. Just make sure it fits you perfect.

^ This.
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Old 05-03-11, 07:58 PM
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fascinating discussion here.... this begs the question ---- is it wrong to go for more of a plush bike like synapse or cervelo RS? In other words, should I consider a CAAD? I am NOT a racer. But, it seems like CAAD sells a lot more at the LBS. Will the comfort/plush bike be boring? How do i know if I will desire a CAAD?
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Old 05-03-11, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by sambb
How do i know if I will desire a CAAD?
Test ride one! See if you like it! If you don't go with the Cervelo!
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Old 05-03-11, 09:24 PM
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Originally Posted by sambb
fascinating discussion here.... this begs the question ---- is it wrong to go for more of a plush bike like synapse or cervelo RS? In other words, should I consider a CAAD? I am NOT a racer. But, it seems like CAAD sells a lot more at the LBS. Will the comfort/plush bike be boring? How do i know if I will desire a CAAD?
I bought a CAAD9 aluminum 3 years ago. I am now picking up my Specialized Roubaix SL2 Rival in a few days. Here's my profile: back into biking at 44, now 47, hadn't road biked in 20+ years! but did some mountain biking on and off in the meantime. Three years ago rode the Roubaix and Synapse, loved them both, but when I finally pulled the trigger to buy them couldn't find my size anywhere (it was August three years ago...I waited too long to buy). The only ones in my size were the higher "gruppos" like Ultrega and it was more than I wanted to spend. The LBS said "wait on it, or get an aluminum Synapse 105 in the meantime, the frame is better for you...don't get a bike you will regret." I was impatient and talked myself into thinking the CAAD geometry was "OK for the amount of riding I will do" and my thinking went like this: "I can buy the CAAD9 aluminum for $1,000 now and if I don't like biking like I expect I'll sell it." To their credit they tried to talk me out of it, but hell, they also wanted to make a sale. Mistake. I'm 47 now, it hurts to bend down that much, the frame is STIFF (but damn fast) and I'm always uncomfortable, but I love riding and that damn bike has held me back. I tried stems, saddles, bars, shoes but in the end, I'm bent way too far over with a bulging disc in my neck. Few weeks back I took a Roubaix for a long ride- much better ride for this 47 year old who rides 50-150 miles/week on bumby/very hilly roads as much for exercise as an escape. Three years ago if I had just spent the extra dollars when I had the chance I would have come out ahead. Ride them and pick what's comfortable, don't give too much thought to what others ride. I should have listened to the LBS, and I suggest if you trust them you do the same and listen to their advice.

Oh...the plush bike will not be boring. I think anything that makes you ride more can't be boring.
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Old 05-03-11, 09:46 PM
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Originally Posted by jrobe
Count the number of threads here from people that bought cheaper bikes and then wondered what better bike to upgrade to. The number of threads would be in the thousands. I went from a Trek to a CAAD to a Cervelo and wasted lots of money on the babystep upgrades.

If you have the money, buy the Cervelo and be done with it. If you love cycling, you will have a great bike for many years (I have now owned by Cervelo R3 for 5 years and have no desire to ever change). If you decide cycling isn't for you, the Cervelo will hold its value extremely well (better than Trek's or Cannondale's). You won't even lose much on a sale. If you have the money, it is a no-brainer. Just make sure it fits you perfect.
What about the number of people that "get into cycling" by buying a nice bike then it sits in their garage until they sell it on Craig's List two years later? You only see one side of the equation looking at this forum.
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Old 05-03-11, 10:11 PM
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Originally Posted by sambb
fascinating discussion here.... this begs the question ---- is it wrong to go for more of a plush bike like synapse or cervelo RS? In other words, should I consider a CAAD? I am NOT a racer. But, it seems like CAAD sells a lot more at the LBS. Will the comfort/plush bike be boring? How do i know if I will desire a CAAD?
You don't have to be a racer to enjoy a CAAD10 (the current iteration). Having said that, there's a downside to such a bike, as noted by Laminarman. A great bike that doesn't do what you want won't be ridden often, and the main idea (for fun and fitness) is to ride often. On a bike like the RS or the Synapse, you can create a relatively aggressive position if you want, but it's difficult to create a more relaxed position on a bike like the CAAD10.

The CAAD10 sells well because it's probably the best bang-for-buck bike for racers and cyclists who like to go fast, and have the flexibility to fit it. You describe yourself as fit, but even when I was a semi-studly younger guy I had limitations due to flexibility. That's just another consideration.

I'm getting a Synapse Carbon 5 in the next couple of months, and I'm looking forward to it. It's what I'm looking for in a bike in my price range. I'd recommend it, or the aluminum version of it, or the RS. Giant, Specialized, Trek and other brands offer similar bikes which are worth looking at (assuming there are dealers in your area). They're all of good quality.

Oh, and none of them will be boring.
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Old 05-03-11, 11:05 PM
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Originally Posted by revchuck
You don't have to be a racer to enjoy a CAAD10 (the current iteration). Having said that, there's a downside to such a bike, as noted by Laminarman. A great bike that doesn't do what you want won't be ridden often, and the main idea (for fun and fitness) is to ride often. On a bike like the RS or the Synapse, you can create a relatively aggressive position if you want, but it's difficult to create a more relaxed position on a bike like the CAAD10.

The CAAD10 sells well because it's probably the best bang-for-buck bike for racers and cyclists who like to go fast, and have the flexibility to fit it. You describe yourself as fit, but even when I was a semi-studly younger guy I had limitations due to flexibility. That's just another consideration.

I'm getting a Synapse Carbon 5 in the next couple of months, and I'm looking forward to it. It's what I'm looking for in a bike in my price range. I'd recommend it, or the aluminum version of it, or the RS. Giant, Specialized, Trek and other brands offer similar bikes which are worth looking at (assuming there are dealers in your area). They're all of good quality.

Oh, and none of them will be boring.
This answered so many of my questions. Thanks
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