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Camelbak and Road bike: Part N

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Camelbak and Road bike: Part N

Old 06-09-11, 07:19 AM
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Camelbak and Road bike: Part N

Good afternoon ladies and gentlemen!

It happens I have bought a Camelbak Rogue since last week. Problem is that I wasn't sure what kind of bike to get back then. Now that I decided to get an endurance road one, is it too bad to use that Camelbak on it? How come nobody uses Camelbak on road bikes around here?

Is there a real disadvantage of wearing a Camelbak on road bikes?

Thank you in advance!
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Old 06-09-11, 07:26 AM
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Sure it's OK. I use a HydraPak but I pretty much have to b/c of complications from a motorcycle accident.

Having said that I'm trying to come up with an alternative b/c the weight on your back, especially if your stem/bars are not real high, gets old. If it doesn't bother you ride with your Camelbak forever.
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Old 06-09-11, 07:27 AM
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I tried it and still use it on short commutes where I need to bring along a few other things. However, I didn't like how hot it made my back feel. I never seemed to mind it too much on my mountain bike. But with my road bike and while wearing a jersey, I never seem to get too hot, but I did with my camelbak on. I guess it is a tradeoff for having a larger supply of cold water. If I were going to be going longer distances without access to water for refills, I would not hesitate to wear my camelbak. But most of my riding I can get by with a couple of bottles, and fill them up if I need.
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Old 06-09-11, 07:46 AM
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Even in the hottest humid GA summers, 48oz from 2 bottles is enough for 3 hours, further in milder temps. If going further than that, it's really not that inconvenient to stop by a convenience store and fill back up.

IMHO, Camelbak's are totally unnecessary weight and encumbrance.
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Old 06-09-11, 08:01 AM
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I use a Camelbak on my road tandem but not on my CADD 9. On the tandem it is dificult to get the water bottels out of the holders due to the frame configuration. Camelback is easier and safer for the tandem but on my single it waterbottles. Camelback is slightly hotter on the back.
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Old 06-09-11, 08:03 AM
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Thanks for your answers. It's not that 2 bottles of water won't suffice, but they will get warm quicker. Moreover, you can store your accessories in the Camelbak, too, without extra saddle bags and pump clips... And I find biting the valve more convenient than raising your head to drink while riding...
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Old 06-09-11, 08:17 AM
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Don't forget that cleaning them is a pain in the ass compared to good old water bottles.... Nasty stuff likes to grow in them unless you are diligent about cleaning.
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Old 06-09-11, 08:20 AM
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I use an Osprey Mantis pack, and it's lighter than most camelback packs, more comfortable, and it has a suspension system that lifts the pack off your back for airflow. I've never felt extra "hot" while using hat pack. It's excellent. Holds 3L/100oz of cold water too! Plenty for my thirsty self.
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Old 06-09-11, 08:22 AM
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Well, for one I'll be using only water inside the reservoir. Secondly, I'll be storing it full in the fridge. And when it needs cleaning it's easily done with soda or denture tabs.

It's not that big of a deal as long as you keep it dry when in warm place.
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Old 06-09-11, 08:27 AM
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I use a Camelbak in the winter sometimes. I fill it with warm water. I find that drinking warm water helps me stay warm without wearing so much heavy clothing. The water doesn't cool down as fast as in water bottles and having that warm spot on my back doesn't hurt either.

That being said, during the warmer months I would never think about it. When it is warm outside, I just don't like having that extra weight up there and lack of airflow over my body when sweating. You'll get used to drinking from a bottle on the bike so that mouthpiece doesn't really add much in convenience to make up for the discomfort.
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Old 06-09-11, 08:29 AM
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Thanks K.Katso...
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Old 06-09-11, 09:01 AM
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OP, it's mostly a cultural thing. Camelbaks first became popular in the mountain bike scene, partly because dual suspension designs inhibited the use of bottle cages, and roadies turned their noses up at them. I don't like how even the best ventilated ones make my back sweat, but other than that, there's nothing wrong with them and they are useful when you need to pack a lot of fluid.


Originally Posted by Menel
Even in the hottest humid GA summers, 48oz from 2 bottles is enough for 3 hours, further in milder temps. If going further than that, it's really not that inconvenient to stop by a convenience store and fill back up.

IMHO, Camelbak's are totally unnecessary weight and encumbrance.
That sounds great for you, but some people need water more frequently than that, and others like to ride in the mountains or deserts where convenience stores aren't around. I still prefer to carry a 3rd bottle in my back pocket, but I imagine I will bring my hydration pack along when I get around to riding 130 miles across the Joshua Tree National Park.


Originally Posted by kayakdiver
Don't forget that cleaning them is a pain in the ass compared to good old water bottles.... Nasty stuff likes to grow in them unless you are diligent about cleaning.
If you only put water in them (use gels, bars, and supplements for calories and energy) and empty them out when you're not using them, it's not a problem.
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Old 06-09-11, 09:05 AM
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Also - a camel back can cover your rear jersey pockets making it a pain to access what you have in there. It's a lot easier to reach around and grab an energy bar or gel out of your pocket to eat without dropping pace than to have to stop and take the camelback off to unzip the pocket to access your food.
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Old 06-09-11, 09:07 AM
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I have a Rogue too, and I love it as well as the other Camelbaks I have owned, but I use it primarily for mountain biking because I feel that a Camelbak on a road bike raises my center of gravity and makes me feel a little insecure when cornering at high speeds.

Regarding the issue of cleaning Camelbaks - In my opinion, the problem isn't so much in cleaning them, I find that very easy and I don't mind doing it after each use - after all, you're cleaning something that was filled with clean water just a few hours earlier, just rinse it out. I think the problem is in drying the bladder and tube out properly and completely. Especially during the summer months when the humidity is high. You have to get them to dry quickly or you will get mold in the tube and/or bladder and have to replace. You have to make sure that you are drying them in a low-humidity environment (i.e. air conditioning on during hot humid summer days) and hanging properly so that all of the moisture can evaporate completely from inside the bladder and tubing. If you get in the habit of doing this after each use it will last you indefinitely and you will never experience any foul tasting H2O.
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Old 06-09-11, 09:08 AM
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Thank you urbanknight! Btw congrats on your son! Best wishes!
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Old 06-09-11, 09:12 AM
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sherpakid, I haven't thought about it blocking my jersey pockets. You may have a point on that.

Kylerk, excellent advice there on drying the bladder. Do you think refilling with water after each exercise session and then storing in the fridge would prevent mold from growing?
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Old 06-09-11, 09:22 AM
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Originally Posted by sherpakid
Also - a camel back can cover your rear jersey pockets making it a pain to access what you have in there. It's a lot easier to reach around and grab an energy bar or gel out of your pocket to eat without dropping pace than to have to stop and take the camelback off to unzip the pocket to access your food.
The people who really don't want to lose pace just stick the unwrapped bars to their top tube Seriously, though, you're right that it's hard to get into the pockets, especially since you don't want to wear the pack too high lest it slide forward when you get in the drops.
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Old 06-09-11, 09:25 AM
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I don't use camelbaks but one of the few times I did it was pretty nice. I filled the bladder and froze it the night before I rode a century in harsh heat and humidity in Hawaii and the water stayed cold almost the entire time. The cold on my back felt good too.
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Old 06-09-11, 09:43 AM
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I love my Camelback Rogue.

But I hate having something on my back when I'm hunched forward on my road bike.

Yes, I have never seen anyone on a roadbike use a Camelback here in Southern California. I've seen them wear backpacks though....???? That to me is strange but I think they are commuters or going on these very long rides. Not really sure.
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Old 06-09-11, 09:49 AM
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Don't use a camelback, but I do have a backpack with a hydration bladder (hydrapak) that I use for all my commutes. Makes it easier to get transition from the bike to work than with panniers and I like the 70 oz of water it stores. More than the two water bottles I'd take with me otherwise and between the ride in and the ride home I've been draining it every day lately.

On noncommuting rides when I don't plan on getting off and need to pull stuff off my bike, I just use water bottles as the bag on my back gets sweaty. I do like the easy of the drink tube and the high volume though. Wish there was a good way to attach a 100 oz bladder directly to my bike so I make sure I'm keeping hydrated rather than just reaching for a bottle when I remember (a lot less frequent then when I have the bag on and the tube is just right there).
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Old 06-09-11, 10:17 AM
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Thanks for your input guys. As I see there's no real reason for not using a camelbak pack...
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Old 06-09-11, 10:22 AM
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It took me a while for me to let go of my Camelbak M.U.L.E. that I used for MTBing.
I thought I'd jump to a Rogue myself, but ended up getting Camelbak ICE Bottles.
Never went back to using a hydration pack as the bottles sufficed for me.

However, I plan on using my M.U.L.E. for a Century or for all day rides.
It's great to keep that extra nourishment and equipment on the ride,
not to mention an MP3 Player, Cell Phone, extra socks, 1st Aid, etc...

But for training, the bottles are enough as I don't ride more than 2 or 3 hours max.
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Old 06-09-11, 10:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Palomar01
I love my Camelback Rogue.

But I hate having something on my back when I'm hunched forward on my road bike.

Yes, I have never seen anyone on a roadbike use a Camelback here in Southern California. I've seen them wear backpacks though....???? That to me is strange but I think they are commuters or going on these very long rides. Not really sure.
Go to the desert double centuries and you will see people in So and No Cal wearing them.
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Old 06-09-11, 10:26 AM
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Guys, someone in a greek forum mentioned hydration packs put extra strain on your back when riding a race road bike, because of the special position. Is this the case?

I mean, can the weight of 2-3l of water on your back hurt you when riding a race road bike?
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Old 06-09-11, 10:30 AM
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Originally Posted by DOOM_NX
Thanks for your input guys. As I see there's no real reason for not using a camelbak pack...
Do what "you" like DNX.
FTW
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