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1x10 or 1x11 road bike?

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1x10 or 1x11 road bike?

Old 06-09-11, 07:13 PM
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esldude
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1x10 or 1x11 road bike?

Just wondering if anyone has built up a 1x10 or 1x11 road bike? For years I rode a 12 speed (2x6). Effectively you didn't really have 12 gears to choose from that made sense. A ten speed or Campy 11 speed looks pretty appealing. Any thoughts about the idea? Current bike is a 2x9.

If anyone has done such a thing would like to know how happy you are with it.
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Old 06-09-11, 07:21 PM
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I believe there are 2 problems that come with doing this (any maybe somebody who knows more will say I'm wrong)

1st, your crank would ideally be mounted on the middle but that would put some strain on the chain when you're in your tallest and shortest gears
2nd, you are more prone to throwing a chain when in your tallest and shortest gears.

Not gonna say it can't be done or hasn't been done but those are issues that you may run into...
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Old 06-09-11, 07:43 PM
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It should work, but maybe not ideal. It's the same as cross chaining at both ends.
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Old 06-09-11, 07:43 PM
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it's terrible and not worth it.

unless you live where there's absolutely no hills or valleys.

besides, why would you pay for relatively expensive 11sp shifters, and not even use them both?
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Old 06-09-11, 07:45 PM
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Why not run what everyone else runs and just never shift your front chainrings?
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Old 06-09-11, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by AEO View Post
it's terrible and not worth it.

unless you live where there's absolutely no hills or valleys.

besides, why would you pay for relatively expensive 11sp shifters, and not even use them both?
Well my plan was to run a single barcon shifter. So there won't be both.

I realize it hurts on steep hills some and maybe descents, but really with "only 10 speeds" I am relegated to flatland. While not my thing some people seem intrigued by the single speed thing. I could use a normal 2x10 and not shift, just liked concept of the simplicity of no front derailleur. It may well be a bad idea. I did want to hear what others thought of it.
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Old 06-09-11, 08:00 PM
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I saw a guy ride a 600 kilometer brevet in Kentucky hills last month, on a fixed gear.

Just sayin'
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Old 06-09-11, 09:15 PM
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In cyclocross they use 1x9, but with chainguards (guides).
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Old 06-09-11, 09:38 PM
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I ran a 1x9 a few years ago with a dogeye and never had any problems.
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Old 06-09-11, 11:00 PM
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I built a 1x10 that's pretty much just for climbing...figure out your terrain/gearing and it's great.
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Old 06-10-11, 09:21 AM
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Is that fork phat enough?
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Old 06-10-11, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by esldude View Post
Just wondering if anyone has built up a 1x10 or 1x11 road bike? For years I rode a 12 speed (2x6). Effectively you didn't really have 12 gears to choose from that made sense. A ten speed or Campy 11 speed looks pretty appealing. Any thoughts about the idea? Current bike is a 2x9.

If anyone has done such a thing would like to know how happy you are with it.
If you are looking for more gear spread then you should look into the SRAM Apex = Compact front double, 10 speed rear with big granny gear. Or you can just get triple up front and put a close ratio cassette like a 12-23T. That would give you a gear for almost any terrain.
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Old 06-10-11, 09:29 AM
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So many comments, so little experience...

It can work great as a do everything gear. Portland has some serious hill AND fast group rides and I didn't have any problems.

I ran a 44 x 11-32 on my C-X bike last year. I also rode it for many fast roadie rides. No problem.

You can run the gear numbers, but it comes out about as low as a 36 x 26 (which is pretty deep) and as high as about 48 x 12.

If you matched one of the new SRAM 11-36 rear cassettes with a 46 or 48, you would have a great top-end.

The top-end was where I was a little slow. I never got dumped on the flats, but I would have to be careful to stay with the pack on descents because if I fell out of the draft, I would be spun out. I could coast with the pack downhill, but couldn't pedal up.

You will need something like a JumpStop on the inside and definitely a bashguard or ring on the outside. Try BBG, they are the way to go.

Also, if you think you are going to lose a bunch of weight, you won't.

No problem with chain life or x-chaining.

Try it. Its fun.

- Z
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Old 06-10-11, 01:16 PM
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+1 on Dino - you see 1x9 or 10 in cyclocross with no problem, especially if a chain guide is used.

You might want to use a long cage RD if you are putting a wide spread (eg 11-32) on the back. 48x11-32 is just a tad lighter than 53/39x12-25, although the gaps are obviously larger.
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Old 06-10-11, 01:33 PM
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Someone should invent a gimbaled chainring and cassette so that you can have perfect chainline all the time.
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Old 06-10-11, 04:47 PM
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your thinking is correct.

i run a 1x7 and have been since 1995. have done 10's of thousands of miles. no problem with losing chain if kept maintained.

the most important thing is to choose a rear cluster that has the range you need. an 11 thru 28 with a 36, 38, 40, or 42 in front can give you adequate range for just about anything you are likely to encounter on a regular basis in the CONUS. i think i have a range of 35 to 85 gearinches. and a downtube or barend shifter can help you reduce cost, weight, and maintenance issues too. i use a cross lever for braking.

as an example, i have a 1979 trek 710 setup this way with little weight weenie stuff and it weights about 17 pounds. granted there are updated rims, but it has a boat anchor brooks saddle.

BTW, a 1x7 will help reduce cross chaining deflection to the point that it will run utterly silent in all combinations.
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Old 06-10-11, 10:09 PM
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Thanks for the feedback guys. Seems what I have in mind is doable, has been done by others, and can work. Very nice it seems.
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