Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Road Bike Confusion

Old 06-17-11, 10:34 AM
  #1  
sdoowe
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Road Bike Confusion

Hey everyone! I'm a novice cyclist who's hoping to get some clarification about road bikes. The short question is, how do I know what road bike is right for me, and how do I find out the real differences between say a $1000 bike and a $5000 bike?

The long version: I recently sold my car and resolved not to get a new one. I'm going to rely exclusively on my bike for transportation. I've been doing this for almost a month now and am really liking the car-free lifestyle. However, I think I need a second bike. I currently own a Trek Allant, which I love! It's a nice cruiser/hybrid that gets me to work and the grocery store and is fun for leisurely rides around town. The problem is, when attempting to travel any significant distance or at significant speed, it feels sluggish and cumbersome. So I think I need a dedicated road bike, but I have no idea how to find the right one for me.

Money isn't an issue, but I don't want to spend more than I have to to get a quality bike that does what I need it to do. I'm thinking in the $1.5-3.5k range. I live in a pretty small town, but there are two major cities about 60 miles north and south of here that I'd like to be able to ride to for a day trip maybe two or three times a month, along with occasional weekend trips to the coast, which is about 50 miles away. I don't ever anticipate hauling more than a backpack of stuff on any of these rides. Also, because there's only one bike shop in a 30-miles radius of me, I'm pretty much limited to Trek bikes, since that's all they sell.

And speaking of bike shops, the one in my town is absolute garbage. The people there seem annoyed by anyone not wearing bike shorts and give vague answers to questions. For example, when I explained my situation and what I needed, the guy recommended the Trek 520, but couldn't explain in real terms why that was the bike I should get. When I asked what the difference was between the 520 and another less expensive bike, I was told that the 520 uses "better aluminum" which sounds like BS to me. When I asked why I should get the 520 instead of one of the more expensive Madone bikes, he said that the carbon fiber bikes were for more serious riders. This was AFTER I had explained that I had given up my car and was going to bike exclusively.

The 520 seems like a good bike, but it felt heavier in the store than some of the other road bikes, and my research online suggests that it's for hauling a lot of stuff and travelling long distances, which I'm not sure I need. The Madone's were nice and light and looked pretty streamlined, but I'm wondering if the salesman meant to say that it would be too much bike for me, as in I wouldn't know how to use it to it's full potential. So any and all opinions are welcome. Thanks in advance!
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Old 06-17-11, 11:06 AM
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This is all you'll need:

http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...d_1_series/2_1

Put the extra 2K into an "upgrade fund". Once you decide that you like the sport, you can always move up. Don't buy the bike if it's not comfortable (physically that is).

Disclaimer: There is NOTHING wrong with you getting the Madone if you've got the $$.

Disclaimer #2: It sounds like you may need to move on to a different bike shop.
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Old 06-17-11, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by sdoowe View Post
Hey everyone! I'm a novice cyclist who's hoping to get some clarification about road bikes. The short question is, how do I know what road bike is right for me, and how do I find out the real differences between say a $1000 bike and a $5000 bike?

The long version: I recently sold my car and resolved not to get a new one. I'm going to rely exclusively on my bike for transportation. I've been doing this for almost a month now and am really liking the car-free lifestyle. However, I think I need a second bike. I currently own a Trek Allant, which I love! It's a nice cruiser/hybrid that gets me to work and the grocery store and is fun for leisurely rides around town. The problem is, when attempting to travel any significant distance or at significant speed, it feels sluggish and cumbersome. So I think I need a dedicated road bike, but I have no idea how to find the right one for me.

Money isn't an issue, but I don't want to spend more than I have to to get a quality bike that does what I need it to do. I'm thinking in the $1.5-3.5k range. I live in a pretty small town, but there are two major cities about 60 miles north and south of here that I'd like to be able to ride to for a day trip maybe two or three times a month, along with occasional weekend trips to the coast, which is about 50 miles away. I don't ever anticipate hauling more than a backpack of stuff on any of these rides. Also, because there's only one bike shop in a 30-miles radius of me, I'm pretty much limited to Trek bikes, since that's all they sell.

And speaking of bike shops, the one in my town is absolute garbage. The people there seem annoyed by anyone not wearing bike shorts and give vague answers to questions. For example, when I explained my situation and what I needed, the guy recommended the Trek 520, but couldn't explain in real terms why that was the bike I should get. When I asked what the difference was between the 520 and another less expensive bike, I was told that the 520 uses "better aluminum" which sounds like BS to me. When I asked why I should get the 520 instead of one of the more expensive Madone bikes, he said that the carbon fiber bikes were for more serious riders. This was AFTER I had explained that I had given up my car and was going to bike exclusively.

The 520 seems like a good bike, but it felt heavier in the store than some of the other road bikes, and my research online suggests that it's for hauling a lot of stuff and travelling long distances, which I'm not sure I need. The Madone's were nice and light and looked pretty streamlined, but I'm wondering if the salesman meant to say that it would be too much bike for me, as in I wouldn't know how to use it to it's full potential. So any and all opinions are welcome. Thanks in advance!
NUMBER 1.
Trek 520 is Chromoly, not aluminum.
It is a touring bike, it is built beefy to handle loaded riding, fenders, racks, paniers, etc. It would make a great reasonable fast, efficient, comfortable, commute, town, self-supported multi-day bike.
Wheels are typically beefier, tires are typically beefier for more comfort, and to support the increased weight.

A serious cyclist uses the right tool for the right job, bikes are tools, when conditions warrant and the stable allows, he might choose one of these.

NUMBER 2.
Madone's/2.x/Ion are racing oriented bikes, with racing oriented wheels. They are not designed for the strength, or mounts for racks, paniers, etc. The wheelsets are often rated for max rider weight of 195lb.
This is for your spandex clad fitness enthusiast or athlete who rides for fun/hobby. This is not a grocery getter.

Not ideal for the car-less, EXCEPT that you have your hybrid bike for grocery getting, so maybe it'll work for you, your weekend bike so to speak, your choice. You'll look weird if your not spandex clad, road jersey, road shoes, absent of various bits bolted all over it, and trying to go fast.

IF that's what you want, I echo cks, the Trek 2.1 is probably everything you should need, won't break the bank, light enough, and good enough quality components that the only limitation will be your legs until you reach pro status ;-)
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Old 06-17-11, 11:42 AM
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here we go, this is easy, Trek's website is perfect. Look at these pictures, decide which fits how you see yourself riding.


http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...mmute/portland


http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/road/touring/520


http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/road/sport
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Old 06-17-11, 11:42 AM
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I'm not a big fan of buying a new buy to upgrade later. You get WAY more bang for the $, ie value, if you just spend the extra cash on the nicer bike.

Carbon frames ride nice. You may not NEED it, but it would be a good thing to consider since it will be the nicer bike of the 2 bikes you'll have.

You can get a VERY nice bike for $1500-2000. Spend some money on a bike fit, and some accessories and save the rest of your money. I would try to work a deal at the LBS, where you will buy the bike and fit, and they exchange appropriate sized stem, saddle, etc on the bike. Worth a try.
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Old 06-17-11, 11:55 AM
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I suggest test riding a 2 series Trek (aluminum) and then a 3 or 4 series (carbon) and seeing if the difference in ride is enough to justify the extra money. For me, with plenty of chipseal around, the carbon was a much nicer ride so I spent the extra money.
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Old 06-17-11, 11:55 AM
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I think if you are going to get around on a bike as a primary means of transportation then I'd recommend a bike that is set up for touring. The ride is more comfortable as the geometry of the bike is made this way. The Portland would be a great choice. For any choice bike fit is critical.

As for the LBS have you spoken with the owner? As the term goes Money talks, BS walks. He or she needs to understand you - your purpose and goals you are seeking in a bike.

I have had several Treks and have been pleased with the overall performance and quality. There are higher quality bikes out there just as there are cars. The Trek line should be able to meet your needs. Good luck and update us on what you get.

PS - I think a tourer is the way to go if you want to travel to the other cities and spend some time there. You can get some panniers that convert to a backpack and carry extra items with you.

Last edited by Trooper; 06-17-11 at 12:00 PM.
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Old 06-17-11, 11:57 AM
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Reread the 2 posts above from Menel...his advice is solid in many ways. I couldn't have said it better. The only thing I would add is that you aren't limited to only what Trek offers.
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Old 06-17-11, 12:01 PM
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Originally Posted by sdoowe View Post
Hey everyone! I'm a novice cyclist who's hoping to get some clarification about road bikes. The short question is, how do I know what road bike is right for me, and how do I find out the real differences between say a $1000 bike and a $5000 bike?
Ignoring the style (eg, touring or racing) of bike, the difference between a $1000 and $5000 is that the more expensive bike is a little bit lighter and a little bit better.

A $5000 bike isn't going to be 5x faster or last 5x longer than a $1000 bike.

That is, it's an issue of diminishing returns. The sweet spot for price/quality is somewhere in the range of $1000-$2000.

Originally Posted by sdoowe View Post
The long version: I recently sold my car and resolved not to get a new one. I'm going to rely exclusively on my bike for transportation.
I have no idea where you live.

It seems you want a bike that will be useful for a range of things. It doesn't seem like you really need a full-on touring bike but a sport/racing style bike might not provide enough options for you. I would suggest picking something in between these two.

What you might want is a bike that can take wider tires, fenders, and racks.

If you have to ride in the rain, fenders do make that much more pleasant. Being able to mount a rack lets you use panniers to haul stuff. (Though, you could consider using a trailer for shopping!)

Something like this:

http://salsacycles.com/bikes/vaya/

I happen to use a "full on" touring bike for day/club rides.

Originally Posted by sdoowe View Post
I currently own a Trek Allant, which I love! It's a nice cruiser/hybrid that gets me to work and the grocery store and is fun for leisurely rides around town. The problem is, when attempting to travel any significant distance or at significant speed, it feels sluggish and cumbersome. So I think I need a dedicated road bike, but I have no idea how to find the right one for me.
That seems like a decent bike.

http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes.../allant/allant

If you don't need to go long distances carrying stuff, Menel's suggestion of a more "racy" bike might make sense.

Last edited by njkayaker; 06-17-11 at 12:16 PM.
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Old 06-17-11, 12:06 PM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by Trooper View Post
I think if you are going to get around on a bike as a primary means of transportation then I'd recommend a bike that is set up for touring.
Correct. If you just sold your car, you don't want to spend $5,000 on a carbon racing bike. While these are wonderful to have, what you need is something you can carry some luggage on, and lock up outside of work or the grocery store.
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Old 06-17-11, 12:30 PM
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With a $3500 budget two bikes would really be the best thing for you. Something like a Soho with fenders and racks and disc brakes for your daily work commute and then a Madone for the weekend rides. Your daily commute bike needs to be able take a beating while requiring little maintenance. Commuter bikes are designed for that specific reason.
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Old 06-17-11, 12:53 PM
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Thank you all for the great advice! I really appreciate the input, and this has already been so much more helpful than the trip to the bike shop.

Menel, you're the first person who's actually tried to explain the real-world differences between bikes. Thank you for that. I suppose pictures like those shown on the Trek site are what have me confused. Coming from a car mind-set, it's easy for me to look at a Kia and a Camry side-by-side and immediately tell the difference. The problem is that, to my untrained eye, if I put a bike like The Portland, which Trek says is for commuting, next to a bike like the 520, which Trek says is for touring, the differences aren't obvious. The two bikes look the same to me, and reading through the parts list doesn't provide any insight into why, for example, a Shimano Trekking M543 crank might be better than an FSA Vero PowerDrive Triple. It's all gibberish to me.

Originally Posted by 55/Rad View Post
Reread the 2 posts above from Menel...his advice is solid in many ways. I couldn't have said it better. The only thing I would add is that you aren't limited to only what Trek offers.
I'd be happy to explore other options, but there's only one store nearby and they only carry Trek bikes.

Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post
Ignoring the style (eg, touring or racing) of bike, the difference between a $1000 and $5000 is that the more expensive bike is a little bit lighter and a little bit better.

A $5000 bike isn't going to be 5x faster or last 5x longer than a $1000 bike.

That is, it's an issue of diminishing returns. The sweet spot for price/quality is somewhere in the range of $1000-$2000.
That's an excellent explanation, and something I didn't realize. I kept trying to ask what exactly I'd be getting for an extra thousand and I'd get vague answers like, "The drivetrain on that one is better."
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Old 06-17-11, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by sdoowe View Post
That's an excellent explanation, and something I didn't realize. I kept trying to ask what exactly I'd be getting for an extra thousand and I'd get vague answers like, "The drivetrain on that one is better."
The other dirty secret is that road bikes (including touring bikes) are not radically different. Different bikes sit in slightly different places on a continuum: Racing bike -> touring bike ->-> your hybrid (there's a bit of a distance between your hybrid and a touring bike).

Originally Posted by sdoowe View Post
The 520 seems like a good bike, but it felt heavier in the store than some of the other road bikes,
It's possible that some of this "heaviness" was due to the feel of the steering. Touring bikes tend to be less sensitive with regards to steering (that is, they want to keep going straighter or track). A racing bike might seem "quicker" because it has more sensitive steering. While some people like this feel, it isn't any real benefit to it for "normal" riding.

Originally Posted by sdoowe View Post
The problem is that, to my untrained eye, if I put a bike like The Portland, which Trek says is for commuting, next to a bike like the 520, which Trek says is for touring, the differences aren't obvious. The two bikes look the same to me, and reading through the parts list doesn't provide any insight into why, for example, a Shimano Trekking M543 crank might be better than an FSA Vero PowerDrive Triple. It's all gibberish to me.
There isn't a radical difference between the two. The Portland is shifted towards shorter rides (maybe because the rider is more upright). It also uses disk brakes (because they work better in wet and real commuters ride in all weather). The 520 is shifted towards longer distance riding. But there isn't any reason you can't use one for the other type of riding.

Keep in mind that people use all sorts of bikes for all sorts of riding.

A touring bike (or something close to it) is the basic "all rounder": usable for club rides, mountain climbing, commuting, riding cross country, and carrying crap. It might not be quite as quick as a racing bike but it really isn't going to be drastically slower.

Last edited by njkayaker; 06-17-11 at 01:18 PM.
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Old 06-17-11, 01:13 PM
  #14  
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Another option to consider is a utility-oriented cyclocross bike, either in steel or titanium.

If you get a reasonably light-enough frame, you could use it for everything ranging from fast rides to light touring to carrying groceries (although I suggest you keep your current bike for short-haul utility cycling).

- Lynskey and Habcycles are 2 options that come to mind in titanium which will not break the bank.
- In steel, plenty of choices: Surly Crosscheck is a popular do-it-all bike that is not too expensive but somewhat heavy - more money will get you a lighter/sportier bike.
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Old 06-17-11, 01:58 PM
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Originally Posted by sdoowe View Post
Thank you all for the great advice! I really appreciate the input, and this has already been so much more helpful than the trip to the bike shop.

Menel, you're the first person who's actually tried to explain the real-world differences between bikes. Thank you for that. I suppose pictures like those shown on the Trek site are what have me confused. Coming from a car mind-set, it's easy for me to look at a Kia and a Camry side-by-side and immediately tell the difference. The problem is that, to my untrained eye, if I put a bike like The Portland, which Trek says is for commuting, next to a bike like the 520, which Trek says is for touring, the differences aren't obvious. The two bikes look the same to me, and reading through the parts list doesn't provide any insight into why, for example, a Shimano Trekking M543 crank might be better than an FSA Vero PowerDrive Triple. It's all gibberish to me.

I kept trying to ask what exactly I'd be getting for an extra thousand and I'd get vague answers like, "The drivetrain on that one is better."
1.
Stop looking at parts list, look at those images, which one jives with how you see yourself =A)

2.
  • Portland is butted and hydroformed al, this suggests that it's going to be lighter.
  • Portland has a carbon fork, to help mitigate road hum and vibrations. Because of this carbon fork you probably can't get front paniers.
  • Notice the rider on the Portland just has a single pack slung over his back, vs. the 520 rider fully loaded down with bags everywhere.
  • The Portland's shifters have integrated shift/brake levers, black lever behind break lever for going down the cogs, vs. bar end on the 520, that's personal preference.
  • The FSA Powerdrive has typical road triple gearing, spread really wide from really tall for going fast and small for climbing steep hills. The 520's trekking crank is more like a mountain crank, it's not geared as tall and it goes even lower, it uses more mountain bike-like components, it's for going up steep hills with a heavy bike loaded with heavy over night gear.

3.
I only know road drivetrains. All shimano stuff starting with sora should be good for 10,000+ miles, durable, will get you into the different gears.
$ sora - plasticy, gets the basic job done
$$ tiagra - still plasticy cheap feeling, improved ergonomics with shift levers
$$$ 105/5700 - mostly metal, quality feel, shifting speed/smoothness enhancements with way chain, cogs and crankset are machined
$$$$ ultegra/6700 - enhancements in metal, such as hollow outer chainring for stiffness, miniscule weight reductions
$$$$$ dura ace - further miniscule smoothness/weight reductions, some carbon bearings here and there, some carbon fibre parts here and there

Tiagra's perfect for many, few benefit with more than 105, IMHO

Last edited by Menel; 06-17-11 at 02:05 PM.
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Old 06-17-11, 02:18 PM
  #16  
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You can tell the difference between a 1,000 bike and a 5,000 bike by the type of riding you will do. There's the practical transportation riding and then there's the sportive riding. They're not the same and that's why 5,000 is the better bike for sportive riding.

The sportive road bike geometry will be different than a touring bike, but you already know that. The sportive road bike will most likely have a different wheelset, with really nice hubs that seem to spin effortlessly. On long climbs the sportive road bike will be lighter, more responsive. By more responsive, I mean when you climb and reach a switchback and enter the turn, it turns better and the lightness of the bike will allow you to hammer through and up the steep section of the switchback.

If you have ever driven a sports car, then you kind of know what handling and quickness means. Even a small Mazda Miata is a fun car to drive (stick shift). My SUV is nowhere's near the fun.

Last edited by Garfield Cat; 06-17-11 at 02:22 PM.
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Old 06-17-11, 02:19 PM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by Menel View Post
1.Stop looking at parts list, look at those images, which one jives with how you see yourself =A)
I forgot to mention that.

Basically, for a given price level, the components are going to be equivalent. Bikes targeting different purposes use parts that are hard to compare.

If you are spending about $1000+ from a trustworthy company, don't worry about which particular bit is better than another.

Originally Posted by Menel View Post
Portland is butted and hydroformed al, this suggests that it's going to be lighter.
Not by very much.

Last edited by njkayaker; 06-17-11 at 02:24 PM.
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Old 06-17-11, 02:27 PM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by Garfield Cat View Post
You can tell the difference between a 1,000 bike and a 5,000 bike by the type of riding you will do. There's the practical transportation riding and then there's the sportive riding. They're not the same and that's why 5,000 is the better bike for sportive riding.

The sportive road bike geometry will be different than a touring bike, but you already know that. The sportive road bike will most likely have a different wheelset, with really nice hubs that seem to spin effortlessly. On long climbs the sportive road bike will be lighter, more responsive. By more responsive, I mean when you climb and reach a switchback and enter the turn, it turns better and the lightness of the bike will allow you to hammer through and up the steep section of the switchback.
It would be very hard to detect a performance difference between a $2000 bike and a $5000 one.

Originally Posted by Garfield Cat View Post
If you have ever driven a sports car, then you kind of know what handling and quickness means. Even a small Mazda Miata is a fun car to drive (stick shift). My SUV is nowhere's near the fun.
The SUV is a poor comparison. It would be more like this: http://www.surlybikes.com/bikes/big_dummy_complete/.
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Old 06-17-11, 02:33 PM
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Extremely informative, Menel! That's exactly the kind of thing I'm looking for. I really want to be a serious rider and understand this stuff, but it seems difficult to find specific information like what you posted. Honestly, when looking at those pictures, the third option looks like what I'm looking for. This is a small town and I live within a mile of my work, a grocery store, downtown, etc. My Allant is great for getting me around here, so I feel like a commuter would overlap that functionality. And I don't see myself doing a lot of fully-loaded, up-hill overnighters until I'm in better shape and more experienced.

So I think I might go with CKS' original suggestion and look into getting a 2.1. Thanks everyone!

ETA. Missed some posts while I was typing. So at what point do I start looking at component lists? Or is that something only the pros really care about?

Last edited by sdoowe; 06-17-11 at 02:37 PM.
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Old 06-17-11, 03:59 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by sdoowe View Post
ETA. Missed some posts while I was typing. So at what point do I start looking at component lists? Or is that something only the pros really care about?
It's mostly related to the price point. The stuff at a given price point is basically equivalent. At $1000+, what you get is going to be very good. Spending more might be a bit better but it'll cost you.

You'll learn more about components by reading/etc but, starting out, being overly worried about them just leads to analysis paralysis.

Last edited by njkayaker; 06-17-11 at 04:07 PM.
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Old 06-17-11, 04:36 PM
  #21  
iheartbenben
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Ditch the madone, get the 2.1 AND the 520......

You'll regret it probably, but a lot less than a madone.
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Old 06-17-11, 05:02 PM
  #22  
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I think that while the Trek 520 is not the most exciting bike you can buy, it will do the job for you. If it's your only vehicle then it had better be able to carry a load now and then. The bigger tires with deeper tread will be handy when it rains or when carrying a heavy load. The frame is certainly up to the job and the steering geometry will be less tiring in day-to-day use than a racing bike. It's also less likely to be stolen than a $3000 carbon racing machine.

PS- Racing oriented bikes are usually limited to using narrower tires but you have a much broader choice with the 520.

Last edited by Elmog; 06-17-11 at 06:21 PM. Reason: ...
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Old 06-17-11, 05:56 PM
  #23  
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I actually think you'll be fine on an intro-level road bike (any) sold at a true local bike-store. (Not walmart).

The components, even the intro-level ones are totally fine, even for heaving training and racing. Not as 'crisp' as a pricey bike, but no speed difference.

My $700 intro-level road bike, which is exactly what a typical intro-level road bike costs nowadays, is good enough for me to commute, race, and run errands. It's cheap enough not to scream 'steal me', won't kill me if I crash/scrape it up, but looks good enough and rides well enough to take it proudly to hammerfest rides and races with competitive roadies. (It's a Giant Defy3, but any other intro bike will do.)

I do have a pricey ($$$$) Cervelo with top-of-line components, and I'll tell you right now - you'll get 98% of the performance with the intro-level bike despite costing <4x as less. If my Cervelo was out of comission on race day, I'd happily take the Giant and make NO excuses about performance, and I wouldn't even gripe about ride quality, as it's so close. I don't have upgraditis because, well, I've got a upgraded Cervelo already, but I have zero urge to upgrade the Giant - it's perfectly good and raceable as stock.

With your cash flow issue, I'd just buy an intro level road bike and ride the crap out of it. You will be making zero compromise with it. (My Giant Defy3 also happen to take pannier racks too.)
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Old 06-17-11, 06:13 PM
  #24  
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Not to be slightly off topic, but if you want to be car free and you don't like your local LBS, drop $500 on tools and a bike work stand to learn to service your own bike. Buy a used road bike, learn to twist the wrenches and upgrade, and you'll have info pouring out your ears. You can pick this stuff up in a hurry, especially with a really helpful forum nearby.

Once you know the basics, you will feel more comfortable buying any bike from any source, internet or what not, without caring what the LBS says.

Or buy a cheap bike and sweet wheels. $500 wheels on any basic bike, even your current, make for a sweet ride.
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Old 06-17-11, 06:34 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by cks View Post
Disclaimer: There is NOTHING wrong with you getting the Madone if you've got the $$.
Unless you want to commute on it with laptop/work clothes/etc. Fifteen pounds of crap are a lot more comfortable in a pannier than on your back and Trek doesn't give you rack eyelets. While you can get a quick release skewer to mount the bottom of a crack and seat clamp eyelets for the top it's a hack.

Unless you want to go places when it's raining. Riding in the rain without fenders puts a stripe down your back and gives you a soaked chamois that may feel like a dirty diaper. While you can get clip on fenders, a frame and brakes configured to clear full fenders will make you less wet.

Unless you want to use it for transportation where you might not be paying enough attention to avoid road obstacles like pot-holes. A slight bend with 32 spoke wheels which removes tension from a spoke or a broken spoke from an obstacle encounter isn't enough to make the bike unrideable (although you may want to open the brake quick release). Low spoke count wheels are less tolerant of that sort of thing.

The OP is selling their car and replacing with a bike.
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