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Andrea Pinarello dies after heart attack

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Andrea Pinarello dies after heart attack

Old 08-03-11, 04:47 PM
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volosong
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Andrea Pinarello dies after heart attack

Quoted from cyclingnews.com web site. Sounds like he was participating in the race. Bummer.

Andrea Pinarello dies after heart attack

By: Cycling News
Published: August 3, 18:36,
Updated: August 3, 18:46


Son of Italian bike maker dead at 40

Andrea Pinarello, the son of the Pinarello bicycle manufacturer founder Giovanni, collapsed and died following the opening stage of an amateur cycling race, according to reports in Italy.

The 40-year-old suffered a heart attack following the first stage of the Giro del Friuli, an amateur Italian stage race. He is reported to have collapsed immediately after crossing the finish line in apparent good health.

Paramedics successfully revived him, but a second heart attack shortly afterwards was to prove fatal.

Andrea, who had a long association with the highly-regarded Italian bike manufacturing family, is survived by his wife and two children.

The Pinarello family has close links to sport, sponsoring major professional teams and riders of the calbire of Miguel Indurain for many years. The company currnetly supplies bikes to Team Sky and Movistar.
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Old 08-03-11, 07:58 PM
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How does this happen? I've heard of people having heart attacks immediately after a strenuous activity. It just doesn't make sense that it happens once the stress is over. Hopefully some medical people around here can chime in and explain why this happens to people.

RIP Andrea.
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Old 08-03-11, 08:04 PM
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He probably had a pre-existing cardiac condition that he didn't know about.
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Old 08-03-11, 08:07 PM
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Originally Posted by ilovecycling View Post
How does this happen? I've heard of people having heart attacks immediately after a strenuous activity. It just doesn't make sense that it happens once the stress is over. Hopefully some medical people around here can chime in and explain why this happens to people.

RIP Andrea.

having multiple heart attacks is fairly common actually. he might have not died from the first one but his body was still frangile and not fully recovered.

kinda like breaking a chair. but then you glue a leg back on but you sit on it before the glue has a chance to harden. so it brakes again
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Old 08-03-11, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by zazenzach View Post
having multiple heart attacks is fairly common actually. he might have not died from the first one but his body was still frangile and not fully recovered.

kinda like breaking a chair. but then you glue a leg back on but you sit on it before the glue has a chance to harden. so it brakes again
But this is assuming that this "clog" happened immediately after the race and not during. It sounds like too much of a coincidence to be the case. I'm wondering if there is some CNS shock (electrical disruption) that can occur from having your heart beating very fast and then having it slow down very rapidly.

I always try to do a few cool-down laps around my apartment's parking lot after a hard ride, but now I'll be sure to do it every single time.
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Old 08-03-11, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by ilovecycling View Post
I'm wondering if there is some CNS shock (electrical disruption) that can occur from having your heart beating very fast and then having it slow down very rapidly.

I always try to do a few cool-down laps around my apartment's parking lot after a hard ride, but now I'll be sure to do it every single time.
for real? i've never heard of anything like that before.
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Old 08-03-11, 08:31 PM
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Originally Posted by zazenzach View Post
for real? i've never heard of anything like that before.
I took a medical electronics course as an elective while working on my electrical engineering undergrad, and we spent a long time talking about different heart conditions and the electrical signals that make the heart beat. I don't know for sure if this is what happened, but from what I learned in that class it's definitely a possibility. There are a bunch of heart conditions that are caused by bad electrical signals being produced by the CNS. Pacemakers and other types of surgically implanted defibrillators are used to catch these erratic signals and correct them when they occur.
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Old 08-03-11, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by ilovecycling View Post
But this is assuming that this "clog" happened immediately after the race and not during. It sounds like too much of a coincidence to be the case. I'm wondering if there is some CNS shock (electrical disruption) that can occur from having your heart beating very fast and then having it slow down very rapidly.
If that was the case, then every pro and most amateur athletes would be dead by now.

Deaths like this are extremely rare, and I see no particular reason to change your behavior because of it. If you're still worried, get a physical and ask your doc to double-check for any undiagnosed heart problems.
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Old 08-03-11, 09:28 PM
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CNS= Central Nervous System,your brain and spinal cord. Pacemakers and defibrillators have nothing to do with the CNS they affect the hearts own electrical system.

As for people dieing after strenuous activities, I think it has to do with all the adrenalin running around the body during the activity. The adrenalin makes your body work a lot better then without. If you are on the border, like this guy might have been, the adrenalin keeps you going. When it wears off, you crash. This is pure speculation as far as Andrea Pinarello is concerned, but I have seen it happen to others. You see a lot of things running on an ambulance for nineteen years.
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Old 08-03-11, 10:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Pete In Az View Post
CNS= Central Nervous System,your brain and spinal cord. Pacemakers and defibrillators have nothing to do with the CNS they affect the hearts own electrical system.

As for people dieing after strenuous activities, I think it has to do with all the adrenalin running around the body during the activity. The adrenalin makes your body work a lot better then without. If you are on the border, like this guy might have been, the adrenalin keeps you going. When it wears off, you crash. This is pure speculation as far as Andrea Pinarello is concerned, but I have seen it happen to others. You see a lot of things running on an ambulance for nineteen years.
Aren't those electrical signals derived from the brain though? I was under the impression that any muscle activity, voluntary or involuntary, including the heart, was under control of the CNS. Is that not the case?
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Old 08-03-11, 11:01 PM
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The heart attack is usually not caused by an electrical problem. Plaques in the arteries supplying the heart itself are usually the villain. It's too bad, as he was still young at 40, had a wife and children, family and friends.
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Old 08-04-11, 03:43 AM
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He could have had cardiomyopathy. I remember when i was 24 (this saturday marks 10 years since), I had my first stroke. I was a total running, skateboarding, and cycling freak. I admit i was in the best physical shape of my life until that may, then my heart started to slump, fast. The night before my stroke, I was "hanging out" with my girl, she went to her place and i fell asleep. I woke up at 9:30am (6 hours later) in a pool of sweat and my heart beating really quick. I tried to call my parents, but then I found out i couldn't talk. I got to the hospital to find out my BP was 190/120. I was sent to Pittsburgh so I could bet to better facilities. They then had told me my stroke was caused by a multitude of things, including a cardiomyopathy.

A cardiomyopathy is a heart condition of where your heart acts like a rubber band and once the blood pumps at a quick rhythm, then that "rubber band" loses its elasticity and loses shape. That's when your heart pumps irregular, some valves don't close properly, and leading up to heart attack, stroke, or death.

I've seen many athletes die this way and I really want to make an org that educates people about this problem. I'm just one of the few who have survived and want to look out for others in the future.

Also, I'm fully recovered since the 1st and 2nd strokes. Just wanted to throw that in there.
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Old 08-04-11, 03:58 AM
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Originally Posted by ilovecycling View Post
Aren't those electrical signals derived from the brain though? I was under the impression that any muscle activity, voluntary or involuntary, including the heart, was under control of the CNS. Is that not the case?

No. If memory serves me correct from anatomy there is a structure on the heart called the "bundle of hiss" that is the source and regulation of the electrical signals of the heart. This is not the only mechanism, the system is quite complex and elegant



(keep in mind I am a botanist, not a doc)

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Old 08-04-11, 08:38 AM
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RIP Andrea. Your family's bikes have given me countless miles and hours of joy.
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Old 08-04-11, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by ilovecycling View Post
Aren't those electrical signals derived from the brain though? I was under the impression that any muscle activity, voluntary or involuntary, including the heart, was under control of the CNS. Is that not the case?
The heart has it's own, self contained electrical system. The autonomic nervous system can tell the heart "I need more blood flow/I don't need so much." but it doesn't tell it how fast to pump. That's left up to a group of cells in the upper right of the heart called the Sino-Atrial node. AKA the hearts intrinsic pacemaker. If you put a heart in a nutrient solution and get it started, it will beat, on it's own, continuously. Throw a little epi in there and it will speed up and pump harder. I believe if you put some norepinephrine in it will slow the heart down. As for being "under control" the heart pretty much does it's own thing in filling the requests of the rest of the body.
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Old 08-04-11, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Joemess View Post
No. If memory serves me correct from anatomy there is a structure on the heart called the "bundle of hiss" that is the source and regulation of the electrical signals of the heart. This is not the only mechanism, the system is quite complex and elegant
(keep in mind I am a botanist, not a doc)
The bundle of hiss is down stream in the electrical system of the heart. The impulse starts at the SA node, then travels to the Atrio-Ventricular node then the bundle of hiss which splits into the right and left bundle branches.
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Old 08-04-11, 09:07 AM
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Doper.
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Old 08-04-11, 09:29 AM
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Regardless of the exact physiological mechanism, we should all be so lucky - to die doing something we love.

SP
Bend, OR
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Old 08-04-11, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by iheartbenben View Post
Doper.
Seriously? You think the report of someone's death is time to make jokes?
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Old 08-04-11, 12:40 PM
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Didn't that happen a couple of months ago?
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Old 08-04-11, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy Somnifac View Post
Seriously? You think the report of someone's death is time to make jokes?
+1. What a doooosh.
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Old 08-04-11, 01:27 PM
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eddiepliers: Glad to read the part that you're recovered. You're right that many (probably more?) athletes and younger people are victims of the cardiomyopathy instead of a blockage. People should know about heart health so they can take advantage of prevention and early detection of heart problems or diseases. The American Heart Association has this as its goal.
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Old 08-04-11, 01:43 PM
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It seems when it happens to celebs or elite athletes, we ask ourselves 'how'? For 15 years I almost drank myself into the grave, smoking a pack a day whilst doing so, didn't exercise, ate a pound of bacon three times a week and generally did not take care of myself. I'm never going to be an elite athlete, but the damage I must've been doing to my body makes me wonder how it is I survive the miles put in over the span of a year (now that I eat right, lost weight and no longer drink - I do smoke occasionally).

Jim Fixx died of a heart condition, and he wrote the book on Running. Basketball players suffer heart ailments at higher rates than baseball or hockey players, hockey players seem to battle cancer more often than other athletes (as a group). It's all so...weird to think of people we consider in tip-top shape dying or being affected by a condition which their activity level should preclude them from suffering.

I don't know the science behind it, but at 40, they had to know something - family history, physicals (he is an athlete after all). If this truly was out of the blue, it was a freak occurrence.

RIP.
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Old 08-04-11, 01:50 PM
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Sad to learn of APinarello's death.

I had been playing soccer since I was about seven years old, and organized soccer throughout my teens and college and post-grad years. Although I had seen quite a bit of horrifically broken bones, what finally made me stop was seeing two people in my adult league just drop dead on soccer fields. One was a 42year old, and the other a 47year old. It was a terrible scene. The 42year old had his wife and young daughter watch him die. I'll never forget it.

I guess what I am trying to say is that we all should try and understand that as we age, we most likely won't continue as the athlete we once were in our younger years. Challenge yourself athletically? Yes, but reasonably so, if I may say.

Sometimes, being reasonable about our physical limits is the sensible way.
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Old 08-04-11, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Pete In Az View Post
The bundle of hiss is down stream in the electrical system of the heart. The impulse starts at the SA node, then travels to the Atrio-Ventricular node then the bundle of hiss which splits into the right and left bundle branches.
Dang it for some reason it did not sound right when I typed it this am....
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