Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

how to carry stuff on longer remote rides

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

how to carry stuff on longer remote rides

Old 09-30-11, 12:59 PM
  #1  
TacomaSailor
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
TacomaSailor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Punta Gorda, FL
Posts: 270

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix road bike, Stumpjumper Comp hardtail, Trance X2 FS mountainbike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
how to carry stuff on longer remote rides

I ride 50+ miles in areas where there is very little traffic, no services, no cell phone coverage, and no one to help if I have problem. Yesterday I did a 65 mile ride up Hwy 165/Mowich Lake road on the slopes of Mt Ranier. I saw only three cars during the 35 miles I was above Carbanado.

I carry spare tubes, tire pump, CO2, lunch, jacket, a 3rd water bottle, camera...etc.

i've used fanny packs and small back packs. I've stuffed everything into jersey pockets.

I don't like the feel of any of those carry methods.

How do other riders carry a bunch of stuff for self support in remote areas while on DAY TRIPS?
TacomaSailor is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 01:06 PM
  #2  
hairnet
Fresh Garbage
 
hairnet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 13,198

Bikes: N+1

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked 18 Times in 10 Posts
try a handlebar bag
hairnet is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 01:08 PM
  #3  
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Posts: 32,069

Bikes: 02 GTO, 2011 Magnum

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1046 Post(s)
Liked 584 Times in 293 Posts
2027 miles last Oct in 22 rides with No Cell Phone.
Seat post rack with bag and spare tire.

__________________
Fred "The Real Fred"

10 Wheels is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 01:10 PM
  #4  
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Posts: 32,069

Bikes: 02 GTO, 2011 Magnum

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1046 Post(s)
Liked 584 Times in 293 Posts
Summer months I add a seat post bottle holder.

__________________
Fred "The Real Fred"

10 Wheels is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 01:19 PM
  #5  
dgasmd
shedding fat
 
dgasmd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: South Florida
Posts: 3,149

Bikes: LOOK 595 Ultra/Campy Record 10Sp, restored Guerciotti/Campy C-Record 6 Sp, TIME RXR/Campy SR 11Sp, and Colnago C-60 with Campagnolo SR 11sp.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Has it occurred to you that maybe you want to carry way too much unnecessary stuff? Sure, it will make you feel secure, but still unnecessary. Other than flat repair stuff and some food to eat, and a place to refill fluids somewhere along the road, I can't possibly think of what is it that you "really need to carry". I pretty much carry the same whether I am going 20 miles around my house or 65 miles with mountain passes in deserted roads in the Alps!!
__________________
Arguing with ignorant people is an exercise in futility. They will bring you down to their level and once there they will beat you with their overwhelming experience.
dgasmd is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 01:30 PM
  #6  
chasm54
Banned.
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Uncertain
Posts: 8,651
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
+1 on you're carrying more than I would. But one of the smaller Carradice saddlebags might suit you, even the smallest would hold everything you have described without you having to carry it on your person and without compromising the handling of the bike. With their SQR attachment they can fit any saddle/seat post combo.
chasm54 is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 01:31 PM
  #7  
Steve in MA
Senior Member
 
Steve in MA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Western Massachusetts
Posts: 300

Bikes: 2010 Specialized Roubaix comp (SRAM Rival), 2009 Trek 7.3FX, Early 80's steel frame Suteki road bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Between jersey pockets, a good sized saddle bag, and a Bento-style food bag on my top tube, I can generally carry everything I need for 100+ miles, except extra water. I generally just have my two bottles, and refill them on the road as needed.

Stuff is generally distributed as follows:

Saddle bag: two tubes, patch kit, tire levers, multitool, phone, cash/debit card, small first aid kit. (No CO2, I have a pump mounted under a bottle cage)
Stem Bag: Food and individual packets of Gatorade powder. Or, I sometimes use this bag for a camera when I don't need to carry that much food.
Left pocket: more food
Center pocket: Vest and/or arm warmers (if needed based on the weather), cleat covers
Right pocket: travel size tube of sunscreen, a few paper towels, anything else I might want on that ride.
Steve in MA is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 01:42 PM
  #8  
carpediemracing 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Tariffville, CT
Posts: 15,257

Bikes: Tsunami Bikes

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 332 Post(s)
Liked 94 Times in 52 Posts
Originally Posted by TacomaSailor View Post
I carry spare tubes, tire pump, CO2, lunch, jacket, a 3rd water bottle, camera...etc.

i've used fanny packs and small back packs. I've stuffed everything into jersey pockets.
I've done some rides like that, no support, out and back 100 mile rides, no one at home until evening. For me it's Vista -> Palomar and back; around here temperature is more consistent so I rarely have more than a vest as extra stuff.

Carried 2-3 tubes, levers, chain tool, allen wrenches, pump, bottles, wallet, phone (DroidX so not small, and I leave it in the holster so it's protected if I drop it), various extra layers (65 deg shore -> 85 deg valley -> 40 deg summit). I put whatever I can in a carefully packed saddle bag (a small one, usually fits tools, 2 tubes, levers, an extra bill, some cardboard for booting a tire), the rest go in my pockets (wallet, phone, some food, vest, maybe a LS jersey, sometimes gloves). Pump and bottles go on my bike. Helmet cam for safety, phone for pictures and misc video.

I've brought a rain jacket instead of a vest (normally not a wimp about rain but to do 2-3 hours in pouring rain, on some long fast descents, possibly in 40 deg weather...)

It's kind of like hiking I guess - you pare down what you can. Although I have very compact tools I've assembled my bike from traveling using just my saddle bag tools. I keep the tubes as compact as possible, roll up everything tight, etc.

One thing is that I don't go more than 2 hours without having some store for food or fluids. I'll carry bars under the gripper of the shorts, gels too, if my pockets are too full.

If I need to I'll wear the vest even if I don't need to, keeping it unzipped and flapping. It attracts drivers' eyes better (movement then color then shape), it doesn't cause me to over heat, and I can easily sit up and zip up if it gets cold or it started to sprinkle.
carpediemracing is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 01:49 PM
  #9  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 22,122
Mentioned: 77 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15191 Post(s)
Liked 6,355 Times in 3,601 Posts
Originally Posted by TacomaSailor View Post
I ride 50+ miles in areas where there is very little traffic, no services, no cell phone coverage, and no one to help if I have problem. Yesterday I did a 65 mile ride up Hwy 165/Mowich Lake road on the slopes of Mt Ranier. I saw only three cars during the 35 miles I was above Carbanado.
I haven't been to Mowich Lake in years. How is this part of the mountain for cycling?



^ Popular with divers.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 02:06 PM
  #10  
cyclezen
OM boy
 
cyclezen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Goleta CA
Posts: 3,222

Bikes: a bunch

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Liked 40 Times in 29 Posts
Originally Posted by hairnet View Post
try a handlebar bag
+1, I use a soft mid-size Seatpack on the front of the handlebar, which is a bit smaller than a Barrel Handlebar bag - fits extra bars, gel, arm warmers and a windvest - If I don;t think weather will be an issue. Camera (I use oldstyle flipphone, no cam - gotta look into flipphone with cam) and space blanket? bigger seatpac or barrel bag...
cyclezen is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 02:10 PM
  #11  
bobbycorno
Senior Member
 
bobbycorno's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 2,543
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Bar bag or Carradice-style saddle bags. Randonneurs (who do that kinda thing all the time) have been carrying stuff that way for DECADES, so it probably works.

SP
Bend, OR
bobbycorno is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 03:03 PM
  #12  
RichardGlover
2nd Amendment Cyclist
 
RichardGlover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Cary, NC
Posts: 1,036

Bikes: Schwinn 2010 World Street, Handsome Speedy w/ SRAM Apex

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Front bag, on a rack designed for it.

Handlebar bags are the perfect size for carrying stuff for a long-distance, remote ride. Putting them on a rack instead of the handlebar lowers your center of gravity and solves a lot of the steering issues related to them.

Don't let other people tell you that you're carrying 'too much'. It's not them that might end up stranded by a busted spoke, slashed sidewall, or sudden change in the weather. Be prepared.
RichardGlover is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 03:19 PM
  #13  
DScott
It's ALL base...
 
DScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 6,716
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
You can be prepared without looking like some guy on his way to drop off all the cans and bottles.

Roadies have been riding long distances in the middle of nowhere for years. It's one reason all the specialized clothing and gear is what it is. Around here, especially in the cooler months, you can see extremes of weather, particularly up in the mountains. With the right selection of clothing, food/hydration, and crisis management supplies (and the knowledge to use it), you can deal with just about anything. I tke the same bike supplies regardless of the ride length so that's already on the bike.

Choosing the right base layers is a start, then choice of arm/knee warmers, vest/jacket, socks/booties, etc. All of it's good to ride all day, or is easily packable. Know where you can stow the bigger stuff, whether it's pockets or toestrapped to the saddle bag. Also, weather sites can make those decisions MUCH easier, but always dress conservatively. Prepare for the worst, hope for the best.

Remember, being warm is important, dry not so much.

Since bike food is pretty portable, extra helpings of bars/gels doesn't take up enough space to worry about. The biggest problem to solve is keeping enough water on the bike, and that just means knowing where to refill on your route. Some people can handle camelbaks, which makes it less of an issue.

Go adventure!
DScott is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 03:26 PM
  #14  
tanguy frame
Senior Member
 
tanguy frame's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Portland, OR metro area
Posts: 981
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I use a seat post rack (topeak), and a trunk bag with a cargo net. everything goes into the trunk bag. there's a saddle bag permanently atatched with tire levers, spare tube, patch kit, and $8.00
tanguy frame is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 03:38 PM
  #15  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 22,122
Mentioned: 77 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15191 Post(s)
Liked 6,355 Times in 3,601 Posts
Originally Posted by RichardGlover View Post
Don't let other people tell you that you're carrying 'too much'. It's not them that might end up stranded by a busted spoke, slashed sidewall, or sudden change in the weather. Be prepared.
+1

Originally Posted by DScott View Post
Roadies have been riding long distances in the middle of nowhere for years. It's one reason all the specialized clothing and gear is what it is. Around here, especially in the cooler months, you can see extremes of weather, particularly up in the mountains.
But in LA, extreme weather is anything colder in 65 F. On Mt Rainier, even just on the paved parts, you can go from 60 F to 35 F and freezing rain in an hour if the wrong clouds blow in.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 03:53 PM
  #16  
DScott
It's ALL base...
 
DScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 6,716
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
+1



But in LA, extreme weather is anything colder in 65 F. On Mt Rainier, even just on the paved parts, you can go from 60 F to 35 F and freezing rain in an hour if the wrong clouds blow in.
Come ride out here in the mountains November-May. It can get pretty cold, especially above 3-4000 ft, and we do get some rain. Nothing like the icy rain you describe, but it's not 80deg year round here as some people believe. It's really nice, actually.

For example, I do a climbing century in April that's typically mid-low 30's at the start. Some years it warms up to over 80, others it stays a balmy 60. Makes planning for that ride a bit difficult. Did another spring century entirely in the rain, one year.
DScott is offline  
Old 09-30-11, 07:59 PM
  #17  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,061

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 140 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3177 Post(s)
Liked 464 Times in 273 Posts
Handlebar bag
Bento bag
Rack bag
Seat bag
And panniers if you've got that much stuff.

Here I've got a Topeak handlebar bag, a Bento bag, and small Topeak rack bag ... that's a typical setup for a relatively short ride ...


My titanium is on the right, and I've got the Topeak handlebar bag, Bento bag, and the Pendle Carradice bag in green to go with the green accents on the bicycle. I really like the size of the Pendle for carrying things. It is a bit larger and more versatile than the small Topeak in the photo above for longer rides ...


For really long rides, I'll put the Nelson Longflap Carradice on the bicycle ... mine is the bicycle with the large Carradice on the back. Actually, for that ride, I could have gotten away with the Pendle, but I didn't own one then. One of the other riders had one, I had a look at it and liked it ... and bought one. I have rarely used the Nelson Longflap since, but it is a good choice for touring or the longer randonnees.
Machka is offline  
Old 10-01-11, 02:07 AM
  #18  
znomit
Zoom zoom zoom zoom bonk
 
znomit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 4,336

Bikes: Giant Defy, Trek 1.7c, BMC GF02, Fuji Tahoe, Scott Sub 35

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 422 Post(s)
Liked 491 Times in 248 Posts
I have a bunch that I use depending on the length of the ride/s and where I'm going.
For day long road rides the Ortlieb Classic Large Saddle Bag will hold pretty much everything you'll need including a spare tyre.
And its aero (my carridace holds a lot more but its a sail).
https://www.wiggle.co.uk/ortlieb-clas...ge-saddle-bag/
znomit is offline  
Old 10-01-11, 02:38 AM
  #19  
javal
Senior Member
 
javal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Örebro, Sweden
Posts: 1,318

Bikes: Monark sportser 1970, Monark sportser 1970ish, Monark folder, Mustand 1985, Monark Tempo 1999, Monark 318 1975, Crescent 319 1979, Crescent 325 c:a 1965, Crescent Starren 2002 (hybrid/sport), Nordstjernan 1960`s cruiser.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Great saddle pack!

Originally Posted by TacomaSailor View Post
I ride 50+ miles in areas where there is very little traffic, no services, no cell phone coverage, and no one to help if I have problem. Yesterday I did a 65 mile ride up Hwy 165/Mowich Lake road on the slopes of Mt Ranier. I saw only three cars during the 35 miles I was above Carbanado.

well, thats great!!!

I carry spare tubes, tire pump, CO2, lunch, jacket, a 3rd water bottle, camera...etc.

If it isnt too hot your body might not need all that water - remember some salt! Lunch is a bit luxury - you cant swap it for something packable & high energy?

i've used fanny packs and small back packs. I've stuffed everything into jersey pockets.

No saddle pack?

I don't like the feel of any of those carry methods.

How do other riders carry a bunch of stuff for self support in remote areas while on DAY TRIPS?
Minimize & packable! Buy food on the road, otherwize stay skinny...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
P5091439..jpg (104.7 KB, 4 views)
javal is offline  
Old 10-01-11, 06:53 AM
  #20  
cshell
In the dark
 
cshell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: VA
Posts: 1,890
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
cshell is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Brocephus
General Cycling Discussion
137
08-09-18 04:39 PM
WT21
Mountain Biking
13
09-14-17 11:44 AM
PatrickGSR94
Road Cycling
57
12-14-12 11:16 PM
stapfam
Fifty Plus (50+)
28
05-31-12 07:44 AM
jlou8
Road Cycling
29
05-28-12 11:46 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.