Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Does the Surly LHT count as a Road bike if your're short?

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Does the Surly LHT count as a Road bike if your're short?

Old 12-14-11, 02:16 AM
  #1  
xenologer
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,592
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 237 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Does the Surly LHT count as a Road bike if your're short?

Hello, never owned a road bike before, all mtbs so far. thinking of trying it out.
Looking at the surly Long Haul Trucker, but.... I'd have to get one of the smaller sizes, which apparantly only fits 26' wheels instead of the 700c wheels of the larger sizes.
Would that still be considered a road bike? or are the small vs large LHTs really totally different bikes under the same name?
Thanks...
xenologer is offline  
Old 12-14-11, 02:32 AM
  #2  
hairnet
Fresh Garbage
 
hairnet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 13,193

Bikes: N+1

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 343 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 4 Posts
It is a touring bike 700c or 26". It is still the LTH with the 26", just as some other manufacturers produce smaller frames with 650c wheels. In fact, 650c used to be one of many wheel sizes labeled 26"
hairnet is offline  
Old 12-14-11, 02:58 AM
  #3  
LesterOfPuppets
cowboy, steel horse, etc
 
LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Valley of the Sun.
Posts: 32,455

Bikes: everywhere

Mentioned: 54 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3906 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 46 Posts
Here's a 26" (650c) road bike. Felt F95 Jr.

LesterOfPuppets is online now  
Old 12-14-11, 10:17 AM
  #4  
MegaTom
Senior Member
 
MegaTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 2,012

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix SL3, Lynskey Cooper CX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
It can be dressed up like a 'road bike' quite nicely with drop bars and a road group.



It will still ride like a 30lb. touring bike though... It's not exactly the most nimble when it comes to turning and maneuvering, and quite a harsh ride it is when it's not loaded up with gear. For what reason are you looking at the LHT? Is it just for the wheel size? I like mine well enough for its intended purposes (commuting, light touring, beer/grocery getter, tooling around the 'hood), but it's far from what I'd want if I was going for something fast and agile for a dedicated road bike.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
IMG_0084.jpg (99.9 KB, 20 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_0081.jpg (93.9 KB, 29 views)

Last edited by MegaTom; 12-14-11 at 10:31 AM.
MegaTom is offline  
Old 12-14-11, 12:54 PM
  #5  
AEO
Senior Member
 
AEO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: A Coffin Called Earth. or Toronto, ON
Posts: 12,258

Bikes: Bianchi, Miyata, Dahon, Rossin

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
^ the OP claims to be short.

5'7" is the shortest a 700c bike can fit with proper geometry and 5'4" is the absolute limit before you run into problems like crank overlap.

However, the LHT, being a touring bike, is built with fatter tires in mind and that makes the smallest size, with proper geometry, 50cm. Just take a look at how the STA keeps getting steeper with each size reduction. The 42cm, with a 75deg STA puts it in track bike territory.

Road bikes tend to have an STA and HTA between 72 and 74 deg.
__________________
Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm

Last edited by AEO; 12-14-11 at 01:01 PM.
AEO is offline  
Old 12-14-11, 02:56 PM
  #6  
ThermionicScott 
hungry
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 18,474

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)

Mentioned: 68 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2028 Post(s)
Liked 98 Times in 81 Posts
Seems like the lower BB would help it fit a shorter person as well. So the OP may not need as small of a size as they think, compared to other road bikes. How tall are you, Xeno?
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 12-14-11, 03:18 PM
  #7  
abstractform20
Senior Member
 
abstractform20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,884
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by AEO View Post
^ the OP claims to be short.

5'7" is the shortest a 700c bike can fit with proper geometry and 5'4" is the absolute limit before you run into problems like crank overlap.

However, the LHT, being a touring bike, is built with fatter tires in mind and that makes the smallest size, with proper geometry, 50cm. Just take a look at how the STA keeps getting steeper with each size reduction. The 42cm, with a 75deg STA puts it in track bike territory.

Road bikes tend to have an STA and HTA between 72 and 74 deg.
that is a great way to just BS "facts".
-why 5'7"?
-proper geometry for what riding preference?
-crank overlap only exists for people @ 5'4"?
abstractform20 is offline  
Old 12-14-11, 03:29 PM
  #8  
OldZephyr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Northern Minnesota
Posts: 319

Bikes: 1985 Trek 720, 2010 CAAD9-6, mid-90s Trek 750 hybrid (winter bike)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I was a little surprised to hear one LHT owner describe the ride as harsh while unloaded. That certainly isn't my wife's experience with hers. She has a 42cm LHT with the 26" wheels, and it's the best fit for her of any bike she's ever owned.
OldZephyr is offline  
Old 12-14-11, 03:30 PM
  #9  
AEO
Senior Member
 
AEO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: A Coffin Called Earth. or Toronto, ON
Posts: 12,258

Bikes: Bianchi, Miyata, Dahon, Rossin

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by abstractform20 View Post
that is a great way to just BS "facts".
-why 5'7"?
-proper geometry for what riding preference?
-crank overlap only exists for people @ 5'4"?
the smallest size 700c bikes with PROPER geometry can be made in is 52cm. Any smaller and the HTA and STA fall out of line with road bike geometry.
52cm is for someone who is approximately 5'7".
A 700c bike for a 5'4 can be made, but the STA will be too steep and HTA will be too slack to avoid crank overlap. In this case it is better to use smaller wheels so the top tube can be shortened without screwing up STA and HTA.

you should use your brain more instead of trying to troll
__________________
Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm
AEO is offline  
Old 12-14-11, 03:37 PM
  #10  
wkg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1,153
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by abstractform20 View Post
that is a great way to just BS "facts".
-why 5'7"?
-proper geometry for what riding preference?
-crank overlap only exists for people @ 5'4"?
He doesn't know what he's talking about but he still insists on going out and giving fit and geometry advice in every single thread. His experience comes from fitting himself on his drop bar mountain bike commuter. He is really short though so he does understand that aspect.
wkg is offline  
Old 12-14-11, 03:48 PM
  #11  
AEO
Senior Member
 
AEO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: A Coffin Called Earth. or Toronto, ON
Posts: 12,258

Bikes: Bianchi, Miyata, Dahon, Rossin

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by wkg View Post
He doesn't know what he's talking about but he still insists on going out and giving fit and geometry advice in every single thread. His experience comes from fitting himself on his drop bar mountain bike commuter. He is really short though so he does understand that aspect.
__________________
Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm
AEO is offline  
Old 12-14-11, 03:55 PM
  #12  
Commodus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 4,144
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by OldZephyr View Post
I was a little surprised to hear one LHT owner describe the ride as harsh while unloaded. That certainly isn't my wife's experience with hers. She has a 42cm LHT with the 26" wheels, and it's the best fit for her of any bike she's ever owned.
Ever touring bike I've ridden has been harsh. They have to be, otherwise they would turn into noodles once they're loaded.

Of course people usually put big tires on them...this changes their perception of the frame's compliance.
Commodus is offline  
Old 12-14-11, 04:12 PM
  #13  
hairnet
Fresh Garbage
 
hairnet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 13,193

Bikes: N+1

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 343 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 4 Posts
Mine is a bit squirrely if the front end isn't loaded
hairnet is offline  
Old 12-15-11, 02:03 AM
  #14  
xenologer
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,592
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 237 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I guess I should give the background info:
having never owned a road bike, and knowing nothing about them or the motivations/attitudes/etc of the style of riding; i want to try it out to be a more well rounded cyclist, also to get to meet new people with the group ride, etc stuff

I'm 5'4", the book between the legs measurement is about 29"
and i have shorter legs, longer torso
my current mtbs are approx 16.5" frames with effective standover around 26"
effective toptubes about 22", distance from hand position to mid saddle about 25/26"

I was looking at the LHT because as a touring oriented frame it in theory lends itself to the short but long shape, other factors that interest me are the steel frame and cantilever brakes
the 26" wheels may be a deal breaker though, if that puts it out of the roadie style (which is what i'm trying to learn about)

so maybe someone can advise me on an appropriate bike? It has to be a QBP brand though, since I'm not willing to pay full retail....

was also looking at;
Salsa casse-roll
Surly cross check
Torker Inter-urban (yeah, not qbp, but my shop happens to have them for cheap)

being a first road bike I'm trying to keep it inexpensive,
factors I strongly prefer: steel frames, overpowered cantilever brakes, abilty to mount racks/fenders

I'm happy to hear any ideas (i wonder if this is beyond the scope of the original topic heading...)
Thanks
xenologer is offline  
Old 12-15-11, 02:19 AM
  #15  
BarracksSi
Bike ≠ Car ≠ Ped.
 
BarracksSi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 13,854

Bikes: Some bikes. Hell, they're all the same, ain't they?

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
For a lot of people, any bike with drop bars is a road bike. They'll look sideways at, say, a Karate Monkey with drops, though.

You mention group rides -- what kind of rides are you thinking of? Most of the weekly rides around here are high-effort workouts, so if you can keep up with such groups with a rack n' fenders, you'll get a lot of respect very quickly.

Remember, your first road bike is a gateway drug towards your second. In my case, I went from a race-ready bike to a hybrid-turned-light touring bike. Just get what you want, save gas money, and think about whether you want something else. It's not a marriage, after all.
BarracksSi is offline  
Old 12-15-11, 06:48 AM
  #16  
halfspeed
Senior Member
 
halfspeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: SE Minnesota
Posts: 12,275

Bikes: are better than yours.

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by xenologer View Post
factors I strongly prefer: steel frames, overpowered cantilever brakes, abilty to mount racks/fenders
Then you're not really looking for a modern road/race oriented bike. (Not that there's anything wrong with that.)
__________________
Telemachus has, indeed, sneezed.
halfspeed is offline  
Old 12-15-11, 11:20 AM
  #17  
eofelis 
The Rock Cycle
 
eofelis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Western Colorado
Posts: 1,674

Bikes: Salsa Vaya Ti, Specialized Ruby, Gunnar Sport, Motobecane Fantom CXX, Jamis Dragon, Novara Randonee x2

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm a bit shorter than you. My first road type bike was a 17" Trek 520. I used it for road riding and some touring. It was nice, probably slower than a real road bike (I didn't know the difference at the time) and a good intro bike for me. It was a bit large for me so I went to a 42cm LHT when they became available (way back when).

I now have a steel road bike and a cf road bike to compare the LHT to. The LHT is as comfortable as a couch, as heavy as, and just about as fast as - ha. But sometimes I still take it out for a road ride of 40-60 miles.

Another bike you might consider is the Windsor Tourist from bikes direct, or the Nashbar steel touring bike. I don't have either of these, but for $600 they look pretty good, and both have 700c wheels. Other folks may be able to comment on these bikes.
__________________
Gunnar Sport
Specialized Ruby
Salsa Vaya Ti
Novara Randonee x2
Motobecane Fantom CXX
Jamis Dakar XCR
eofelis is offline  
Old 12-15-11, 11:51 AM
  #18  
valygrl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 8,546
Mentioned: 83 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
An LHT is a tour bike, the cross check is a cyclo cross bike. You're list of required features are not compatible with "road bike" - so you should decide which is important to you, because the bike on your list aren't road bikes.

If you ever want to ride with a group, you're going to want a lighter bike. Not just to fit in, but to keep up.

If you want to fit in with roadie style (I approve), you want 700c wheels, integrated shifters (not bar-end), drop bars, and road brakes. You can get light clip-on fenders for road bikes if you need them, and racks don't belong on road bikes. You'll probably have more choices in aluminum frames than steel.

I'm 5'2" and ride 700c wheel bike with a 505-515 Effective Top Tube. At 5'4" there are tons of choices out there for you. Look for bikes that are "sized" in the 48-50cm range, with an effective TT of around 515-525. You don't have to go to a small wheel at your height.

I currently ride a Scott CR1 size 47, you'd probably be on a 49. I don't shop in your price range, so I don't have anything specific to recommend.
valygrl is offline  
Old 12-15-11, 11:54 AM
  #19  
c3hamby
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 216
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by OldZephyr View Post
I was a little surprised to hear one LHT owner describe the ride as harsh while unloaded. That certainly isn't my wife's experience with hers. She has a 42cm LHT with the 26" wheels, and it's the best fit for her of any bike she's ever owned.
Agreed. I like to compare my LHT to a 71 Plymouth Fury-nice soft ride and powerful-loaded or unloaded.
c3hamby is offline  
Old 12-15-11, 11:56 AM
  #20  
valygrl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 8,546
Mentioned: 83 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
^^ my Trek 520 (steel tour bike) is harsh unloaded and plush loaded. My titanium road bike is smooth. My carbon road bike is smooth and accelerates fast.
valygrl is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
KirkeIsWaiting
Professional Cycling For the Fans
2
07-08-05 12:12 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.